Interrogative

interrogative sentenceinterrogative moodQuestionsdeclarative questionINTinterrogative forminterrogative modalityInterrogative sentencesinterrogativesinterrogativity
Interrogative is a term used in grammar to refer to features that form questions.wikipedia
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Grammatical mood

moodmoodsmode
Such sentences may exhibit an interrogative grammatical mood. This applies particularly to languages that use different inflected verb forms to make questions.
Some examples of moods are indicative, interrogative, imperative, subjunctive, injunctive, optative, and potential.

Question

answerwh-questionquestions
Interrogative is a term used in grammar to refer to features that form questions. Interrogative sentences are generally divided between yes–no questions, which ask whether or not something is the case (and invite an answer of the yes/no type), and wh-questions, which specify the information being asked about using a word like which, who, how, etc.
Questions are often conflated with interrogatives, which are the grammatical forms typically used to achieve them.

Tag question

tag questionsquestion tagtag-question
Tag questions are questions "tagged" onto the end of sentences to invite confirmation, as in "She left earlier, didn't she?"
A tag question (also known as tail question) is a grammatical structure in which a declarative or an imperative statement is turned into an interrogative fragment (the "tag").

Interrogative word

interrogative pronouninterrogativeinterrogative pronouns
Interrogative sentences can serve as yes–no questions or as wh-questions, the latter being formed using an interrogative word such as who, which, where or how to specify the information required.
For more information about the grammatical rules for forming questions in various languages, see Interrogative.

Content clause

indirect questiondeclarative content clausedirect question
Indirect questions (or interrogative content clauses) are subordinate clauses used within sentences to refer to a question (as opposed to direct questions, which are interrogative sentences themselves).
There are two main kinds of content clauses: declarative content clauses (or that-clauses), which correspond to declarative sentences, and interrogative content clauses, which correspond to interrogative sentences.

List of glossing abbreviations

abbreviatedglossing abbreviationglossing abbreviations
Interrogative mood or other interrogative forms may be denoted by the glossing abbreviation.

Word order

free word orderconstituent orderword-order
Different languages have various ways of forming questions, such as word order or the insertion of interrogative particles.
However, most languages are generally assumed to have a basic word order, called the unmarked word order; other, marked word orders can then be used to emphasize a sentence element, to indicate modality (such as an interrogative modality), or for other purposes.

Irish language

IrishGaelicIrish Gaelic
Languages with some degree of this feature include Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, Greenlandic, Nenets, Central Alaskan Yup'ik, Turkish, Finnish, Korean and Venetian.
There are a number of preverbal particles marking the negative, interrogative, subjunctive, relative clauses, etc. There is a verbal noun, and verbal adjective.

Greenlandic language

GreenlandicKalaallisutGreenlandic Inuit
Languages with some degree of this feature include Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, Greenlandic, Nenets, Central Alaskan Yup'ik, Turkish, Finnish, Korean and Venetian.
The four independent moods are: indicative, interrogative, imperative, optative.

Do-support

do''-supportauxiliary ''dodo
In sentences where no such verb is otherwise present, the auxiliary do (does, did) is introduced to enable the inversion (for details see do-support, and.
The presence of an auxiliary (or copular) verb allows subject–auxiliary inversion to take place, as is required in most interrogative sentences in English.

Wh-movement

wh''-frontingwh-frontingfronted
However, in terms of word order, the interrogative word (or the phrase it is part of) is brought to the start of the sentence (an example of wh-fronting) in many languages.
In linguistics, wh-movement (also known as wh-fronting or wh-extraction or long-distance dependency) concerns special rules of syntax, observed in many languages around the world, involving the placement of interrogative words.

Question mark

????interrogation point
In languages written in Latin or Cyrillic, as well as certain other scripts, a question mark at the end of the sentence identifies it as a question.
The question mark [ ? ] (also known as interrogation point, query, or eroteme in journalism) is a punctuation mark that indicates an interrogative clause or phrase in many languages.

Modern English

EnglishModern18th century
In the case of Modern English, inversion is used, but can only take place with a limited group of verbs (called auxiliaries or "special verbs").
use of auxiliary verbs becomes mandatory in interrogative sentences.

A-not-A question

A-not-A
Another way of forming yes–no questions is the A-not-A construction, found for example in Chinese, which offers explicit yes or no alternatives:
Interrogative

Grammar

grammaticalgrammaticallyrules of language
Interrogative is a term used in grammar to refer to features that form questions.

Inflection

inflectedinflectional morphologyinflect
Such sentences may exhibit an interrogative grammatical mood. This applies particularly to languages that use different inflected verb forms to make questions.

Yes–no question

yes-no questionyes/no questionpolar question
Interrogative sentences can serve as yes–no questions or as wh-questions, the latter being formed using an interrogative word such as who, which, where or how to specify the information required. Interrogative sentences are generally divided between yes–no questions, which ask whether or not something is the case (and invite an answer of the yes/no type), and wh-questions, which specify the information being asked about using a word like which, who, how, etc.

Grammatical particle

particleparticlesgrammatical particles
Different languages have various ways of forming questions, such as word order or the insertion of interrogative particles.

Intonation (linguistics)

intonationintonationalintonations
Questions are frequently marked by intonation, in particular a rising intonation pattern – in some languages this may be the sole method of distinguishing a yes–no question from a declarative statement.

Yes and no

noyesyes" or "no
Interrogative sentences are generally divided between yes–no questions, which ask whether or not something is the case (and invite an answer of the yes/no type), and wh-questions, which specify the information being asked about using a word like which, who, how, etc.

Affirmation and negation

negationnegativepolarity
Negative questions are formed from negative sentences, as in "Aren't you coming?"

Dependent clause

subordinate clausesubordinate clausessubordinate
Indirect questions (or interrogative content clauses) are subordinate clauses used within sentences to refer to a question (as opposed to direct questions, which are interrogative sentences themselves).

Inversion (linguistics)

inversioninvertedinverting
Note that English and many other languages do not use inversion in indirect questions, even though they would in the corresponding direct question ("Where is Jack?"), as described in the following section.

Syntax

syntacticsyntacticalsyntactically
Languages may use both syntax and prosody to distinguish interrogative sentences (which pose questions) from declarative sentences (which state propositions).

Prosody (linguistics)

prosodyprosodicprosodically
Languages may use both syntax and prosody to distinguish interrogative sentences (which pose questions) from declarative sentences (which state propositions).