Interrogative word

interrogative pronouninterrogativeinterrogative pronounsinterrogativeswh-word-everinterrogative wordsinterrogative particlequestion wordquestion words
An interrogative word or question word is a function word used to ask a question, such as what, when, where, who, which, whom, whose, why, and how.wikipedia
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Who (pronoun)

whowhomuse of "to whom" as opposed to "to who
An interrogative word or question word is a function word used to ask a question, such as what, when, where, who, which, whom, whose, why, and how.
The pronoun who, in English, is an interrogative pronoun and a relative pronoun, used chiefly to refer to humans.

Five Ws

Circumstances5 WCircumstances (rhetoric)
They are sometimes called wh-words, because in English most of them start with wh- (compare Five Ws).
According to the principle of the Five Ws, a report can only be considered complete if it answers these questions starting with an interrogative word:

List of Latin-script digraphs

ngrrnj
They are sometimes called wh-words, because in English most of them start with wh- (compare Five Ws). Ultimately, the English interrogative pronouns (those beginning with wh in addition to the word how), derive from the Proto-Indo-European root k w o- or k w i, the former of which was reflected in Proto-Germanic as χ w a- or kh w a-, due to Grimm's law.
is used Faroese and Icelandic for (often ), generally in wh-words, but also in other words, such as Faroese hvonn.

Interrogative

interrogative sentenceinterrogative moodinterrogatives
For more information about the grammatical rules for forming questions in various languages, see Interrogative.
Interrogative sentences can serve as yes–no questions or as wh-questions, the latter being formed using an interrogative word such as who, which, where or how to specify the information required.

Pro-form

proformcorrelative pronouncorrelatives
An interrogative pro-form is a pro-form that denotes the (unknown) item in question and may itself fall into any of the above categories.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
They are sometimes called wh-words, because in English most of them start with wh- (compare Five Ws).
In most cases, interrogative words (wh-words; e.g. what, who, where, when, why, how) appear in a fronted position.

Pronoun

pronounspronominalpronominal system
Subtypes include personal and possessive pronouns, reflexive and reciprocal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, relative and interrogative pronouns, and indefinite pronouns.

Question

answerquestionswh-question
An interrogative word or question word is a function word used to ask a question, such as what, when, where, who, which, whom, whose, why, and how.
These use interrogative words (wh-words) such as when, which, who, how, etc. to specify the information that is desired.

Determiner

determinersDeterminer (linguistics)definite determiner
That is, a determiner may indicate whether the noun is referring to a definite or indefinite element of a class, to a closer or more distant element, to an element belonging to a specified person or thing, to a particular number or quantity, etc. Common kinds of determiners include definite and indefinite articles (like the English the and a or an), demonstratives (this and that), possessive determiners (my and their), quantifiers (many, few and several), cardinal numbers, distributive determiners (each, any), and interrogative determiners (which).

Relative pronoun

relativerelative pronounsrel.
In English and various other languages the same forms are also used as relative pronouns in certain relative clauses (The country where he was born) and certain adverb clauses (I go where he goes).
For example, the English which is also an interrogative word.

Proto-Indo-European pronouns

pronounsIndo-European rootk w o-
Ultimately, the English interrogative pronouns (those beginning with wh in addition to the word how), derive from the Proto-Indo-European root k w o- or k w i, the former of which was reflected in Proto-Germanic as χ w a- or kh w a-, due to Grimm's law.
There was also a pronoun with the stem (adjectival ) used both as an interrogative and an indefinite pronoun.

English relative clauses

relative clausesrelative pronouns restrictive relative clauses
The words used as relative pronouns have other uses in English grammar: that can be a demonstrative or a conjunction, while which, what, who, whom and whose can be interrogatives.

Grimm's law

Germanic sound shiftdiscoveries of the Grimmsfirst Germanic consonant shift
Ultimately, the English interrogative pronouns (those beginning with wh in addition to the word how), derive from the Proto-Indo-European root k w o- or k w i, the former of which was reflected in Proto-Germanic as χ w a- or kh w a-, due to Grimm's law.
One of the more conspicuous present surface correspondences is the English digraph wh and the corresponding Latin and Romance digraph qu, notably found in interrogative words (wh-words) such as the five Ws.

Locative adverb

hencewhencelocative
They are also usually closely related to locative interrogative adverbs; in English, there is (or, at least, once was) a formal relationship between "where/there/here", "whither/thither/hither", and "whence/thence/hence".

Indefinite pronoun

indefiniteindefinite pronounsanybody

Mongolian language

MongolianMongolKhalkha-Mongolian
Other word (sub-)classes include interrogative pronouns, conjunctions (which take participles), spatials, and particles, the last being rather numerous.

Relative clause

relativerelative clausesfree relative clause
In English and various other languages the same forms are also used as relative pronouns in certain relative clauses (The country where he was born) and certain adverb clauses (I go where he goes).
However, the relative clause in (7a) looks more like an indirect question, complete with the interrogative complementiser, kung 'if', and a pre-verbally positioned WH-word like saan 'where', as in (7b).

Function word

grammatical wordfunctionallexical words
An interrogative word or question word is a function word used to ask a question, such as what, when, where, who, which, whom, whose, why, and how.

Content clause

indirect questiondeclarative content clausenoun clause
They may be used in both direct questions (Where is he going?) and in indirect questions (I wonder where he is going).

Yes–no question

yes-no questionyes/no questionpolar question
A particular type of interrogative word is the interrogative particle, which serves to convert a statement into a yes–no question, without having any other meaning.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
Examples include est-ce que in French, ли li in Russian, czy in Polish, ĉu in Esperanto, কি ki in Bengali, / ma in Mandarin Chinese, mı/mi in Turkish, pa in Ladin, か ka in Japanese, ko/kö in Finnish and ли (da) li in Serbo-Croatian.

Russian language

RussianRussian-languageRussian:
Examples include est-ce que in French, ли li in Russian, czy in Polish, ĉu in Esperanto, কি ki in Bengali, / ma in Mandarin Chinese, mı/mi in Turkish, pa in Ladin, か ka in Japanese, ko/kö in Finnish and ли (da) li in Serbo-Croatian.

Polish language

PolishplPolish-language
Examples include est-ce que in French, ли li in Russian, czy in Polish, ĉu in Esperanto, কি ki in Bengali, / ma in Mandarin Chinese, mı/mi in Turkish, pa in Ladin, か ka in Japanese, ko/kö in Finnish and ли (da) li in Serbo-Croatian.

Esperanto

EsperantistEsperanto languageEsperantists
Examples include est-ce que in French, ли li in Russian, czy in Polish, ĉu in Esperanto, কি ki in Bengali, / ma in Mandarin Chinese, mı/mi in Turkish, pa in Ladin, か ka in Japanese, ko/kö in Finnish and ли (da) li in Serbo-Croatian.

Bengali language

BengaliBanglaBengali-language
Examples include est-ce que in French, ли li in Russian, czy in Polish, ĉu in Esperanto, কি ki in Bengali, / ma in Mandarin Chinese, mı/mi in Turkish, pa in Ladin, か ka in Japanese, ko/kö in Finnish and ли (da) li in Serbo-Croatian.