Introduced species

introducedexotic speciesintroductionnaturalizedexoticexoticsexotic plantsnon-native speciesalien speciesintroduced plant species
An introduced species (alien species, exotic species, non-indigenous species, or non-native species) is a species living outside its native distributional range, but which has arrived there by human activity, either deliberate or accidental.wikipedia
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Invasive species

invasiveinvasive plant speciesinvasive plant
Introduced species that become established and spread beyond the place of introduction are called invasive species.
An invasive species is a species that is not native to a specific location (an introduced species), and that has a tendency to spread to a degree believed to cause damage to the environment, human economy or human health.

Adventive species

adventiveadventive plantsintroduced
Examples of these terms are acclimatized, adventive, naturalized, and immigrant species but those terms refer to a subset of introduced species.
It may have had help from humans as an introduced species or it may not.

Species distribution

rangedistributionranges
An introduced species (alien species, exotic species, non-indigenous species, or non-native species) is a species living outside its native distributional range, but which has arrived there by human activity, either deliberate or accidental.
Sometimes a distinction is made between a species' natural, endemic, indigenous, or native range, where it has historically originated and lived, and the range where a species has more recently established itself. Many terms are used to describe the new range, such as non-native, naturalized, introduced, transplanted, invasive, or colonized range. Introduced typically means that a species has been transported by humans (intentionally or accidentally) across a major geographical barrier.

Common carp

carpCyprinus carpioEuropean carp
Eurasian carp was first introduced to the United States as a potential food source.
The native wild populations are considered vulnerable to extinction by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), but the species has also been domesticated and introduced (see aquaculture) into environments worldwide, and is often considered a destructive invasive species, being included in the list of the world's 100 worst invasive species.

Glossary of invasion biology terms

invasion biologydefinition
By definition, a species is considered "introduced" when its transport into an area outside of its native range is human mediated.
Invasive species, or invasive exotics, is a nomenclature term and categorization phrase used for flora and fauna, and for specific restoration-preservation processes in native habitats.

Earthworms as invasive species

Numerous fish and game animals have been introduced for the purposes of sport fishing and hunting (earthworms as invasive species).
Introduced species are commonly found in agricultural environments along with persistent natives.

Indigenous (ecology)

nativeindigenousnative species
An introduced species (alien species, exotic species, non-indigenous species, or non-native species) is a species living outside its native distributional range, but which has arrived there by human activity, either deliberate or accidental.
Outside this native range, a species may be introduced by human activity, either intentionally or unintentionally; it is then referred to as an introduced species within the regions where it was anthropogenically introduced.

Zebra mussel

zebra musselszebrazebra mussel (''Dreissena polymorpha'')
There are also numerous examples of marine organisms being transported in ballast water, one being the zebra mussel. Examples of introduced animals that have become invasive include the gypsy moth in eastern North America, the zebra mussel and alewife in the Great Lakes, the Canada goose and gray squirrel in Europe, the muskrat in Europe and Asia, the cane toad and red fox in Australia, nutria in North America, Eurasia, and Africa, and the common brushtail possum in New Zealand.
However, the zebra mussel has been accidentally introduced to numerous other areas, and has become an invasive species in many countries worldwide.

Starling

starlingsSturnidaeEuropean starling
Famous examples include the introduction of starlings to North America by Englishman Eugene Schieffelin, a lover of the works of Shakespeare and the chairman of the American Acclimatization Society, who, it is rumoured, wanted to introduce all of the birds mentioned in Shakespeare's plays into the United States.
In South Africa, the red-winged starling is an important disperser of the introduced Acacia cyclops.

Australian Dung Beetle Project

About twenty species of African and European dung beetles have established themselves in Australia after deliberate introduction by the Australian Dung Beetle Project in an effort to reduce the impact of livestock manure.
To avoid the introduced dung beetles out-competing native Australian species of coprid that have a preference for other types of dung, the introduced species needed to prefer cattle dung over other types.

Cane toad

Bufo marinusRhinella marinacane toads
Examples of introduced animals that have become invasive include the gypsy moth in eastern North America, the zebra mussel and alewife in the Great Lakes, the Canada goose and gray squirrel in Europe, the muskrat in Europe and Asia, the cane toad and red fox in Australia, nutria in North America, Eurasia, and Africa, and the common brushtail possum in New Zealand.
The cane toad (Rhinella marina), also known as the giant neotropical toad or marine toad, is a large, terrestrial true toad native to South and mainland Central America, but which has been introduced to various islands throughout Oceania and the Caribbean, as well as Northern Australia.

Muskrat

muskratsmusk ratCommon muskrat
Examples of introduced animals that have become invasive include the gypsy moth in eastern North America, the zebra mussel and alewife in the Great Lakes, the Canada goose and gray squirrel in Europe, the muskrat in Europe and Asia, the cane toad and red fox in Australia, nutria in North America, Eurasia, and Africa, and the common brushtail possum in New Zealand.
The muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus), the only species in genus Ondatra and tribe Ondatrini, is a medium-sized semiaquatic rodent native to North America and is an introduced species in parts of Europe, Asia, and South America.

Ecosystem

ecosystemsenvironmenteco-system
It has a strong potential to overgrow natural biotopes, and represents a major risk for sublittoral ecosystems.
The introduction of non-native species can cause substantial shifts in ecosystem function.

Asian carp

carpAsian carp (Carp of Israel)Asian carp)
There is also the accidental release of the Africanized honey bees (AHB), known colloquially as "killer bees" or Africanized bee to Brazil in 1957 and the Asian carps to the United States.
Some species of Asian carp cause harm when they are introduced to new environments.

House sparrow

Passer domesticussparrowhouse sparrows
Some species, such as the brown rat, house sparrow, ring-necked pheasant and European starling, have been introduced very widely.
Its intentional or accidental introductions to many regions, including parts of Australasia, Africa, and the Americas, make it the most widely distributed wild bird.

Feral

feral animalstrayferal dogs
In addition there are some agricultural and pet species that frequently become feral; these include rabbits, dogs, ducks, goats, fish, pigs and cats.
As with an introduced species, the introduction of feral animals or plants to non-native regions may disrupt ecosystems and has, in some cases, contributed to extinction of indigenous species.

Yellowstone National Park

YellowstoneYellowstone ParkYellowstone territory
Examples of successful reintroductions include wolves to Yellowstone National Park in the U.S., and the red kite to parts of England and Scotland.
Another 170 species are considered to be exotic species and are non-native.

European rabbit

rabbitsrabbitOryctolagus cuniculus
Yet another prominent example of an introduced species that became invasive is the European rabbit in Australia.
The European rabbit has been introduced as an exotic species into several environments, often with harmful results to vegetation and local wildlife, making it an invasive species.

Directed panspermia

alien visitorsplant life on other planets
Directed panspermia
Directed panspermia is the deliberate transport of microorganisms in space to be used as introduced species on lifeless but habitable astronomical objects.

Invasive species in New Zealand

invasive speciesIntroduced mammalian predatorsinvasive species there
Introduced species in New Zealand
A number of introduced species, some of which have become invasive species, have been added to New Zealand's native flora and fauna.

American Acclimatization Society

as part of an effort to bring all species
Famous examples include the introduction of starlings to North America by Englishman Eugene Schieffelin, a lover of the works of Shakespeare and the chairman of the American Acclimatization Society, who, it is rumoured, wanted to introduce all of the birds mentioned in Shakespeare's plays into the United States.
Introduced species

List of introduced species

introduced
List of introduced species
A complete list of introduced species for even quite small areas of the world would be dauntingly long.

Introduced mammals on seabird breeding islands

Introduced mammals on seabird breeding islands
The two leading threats to seabirds are accidental bycatch by commercial fishing operations and introduced mammals on their breeding islands.

Eastern gray squirrel

grey squirrelgray squirrelsquirrel
Examples of introduced animals that have become invasive include the gypsy moth in eastern North America, the zebra mussel and alewife in the Great Lakes, the Canada goose and gray squirrel in Europe, the muskrat in Europe and Asia, the cane toad and red fox in Australia, nutria in North America, Eurasia, and Africa, and the common brushtail possum in New Zealand.
The eastern gray squirrel is an introduced species in a variety of locations in western North America: in western Canada, to the southwest corner of British Columbia and to the city of Calgary, Alberta; in the United States, to the states of Washington and Oregon and, in California, to the city of San Francisco and the San Francisco Peninsula area in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties, south of the city.

Genetic pollution

genetic swampinggenetically polluted [1]
Genetic pollution
Some conservation biologists and conservationists have used genetic pollution for a number of years as a term to describe gene flow from a non-native, invasive subspecies, domestic, or genetically-engineered population to a wild indigenous population.