Inuktitut

Inuktitut languageInuktitukInuktitut writingikuNunavimmiutitutQikiqtaaluk nigianiAivilingmiututEastern Canadian InuktitutikeInuit
Inuktitut (, syllabics ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ; from, "person" + -titut, "like", "in the manner of"), also Eastern Canadian Inuktitut, is one of the principal Inuit languages of Canada.wikipedia
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Inuktitut syllabics

syllabicsInuktitutak'''ł'''ak
Inuktitut (, syllabics ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ; from, "person" + -titut, "like", "in the manner of"), also Eastern Canadian Inuktitut, is one of the principal Inuit languages of Canada.
Inuktitut syllabics (Inuktitut: ᖃᓂᐅᔮᖅᐸᐃᑦ or ᑎᑎᕋᐅᓯᖅ ᓄᑖᖅ ) is an abugida-type writing system used in Canada by the Inuktitut-speaking Inuit of the territory of Nunavut and the Nunavik region in Quebec.

Newfoundland and Labrador

NewfoundlandNLNewfoundland & Labrador
It is spoken in all areas north of the tree line, including parts of the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Quebec, to some extent in northeastern Manitoba as well as the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.
In Labrador, the indigenous languages Innu-aimun and Inuktitut are also spoken.

Inuit languages

InuitInuit languageInuktitut
Inuktitut (, syllabics ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ; from, "person" + -titut, "like", "in the manner of"), also Eastern Canadian Inuktitut, is one of the principal Inuit languages of Canada.
In Canada, the word Inuktitut is routinely used to refer to all Canadian variants of the Inuit traditional language, and it is under that name that it is recognised as one of the official languages of Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.

Northwest Territories

North-West TerritoriesNTNorth West Territories
It is spoken in all areas north of the tree line, including parts of the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Quebec, to some extent in northeastern Manitoba as well as the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.
In Inuktitut, the Northwest Territories are referred to as ᓄᓇᑦᓯᐊᖅ (Nunatsiaq), "beautiful land."

Nunavut

NUGovernment of NunavutNunavut Territory
It is spoken in all areas north of the tree line, including parts of the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Quebec, to some extent in northeastern Manitoba as well as the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.
Nunavut means "our land" in the native language Inuktitut.

Canadian Aboriginal syllabics

syllabicsCanadian syllabicsUnified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
It is one of the aboriginal languages written with Canadian Aboriginal syllabics.
They are also used to write Inuktitut in the eastern Canadian Arctic; there they are co-official with the Latin script in the territory of Nunavut.

Nunavik

northern QuebecNunavik QuébecNunavik region
It also has legal recognition in Nunavik—a part of Quebec—thanks in part to the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, and is recognised in the Charter of the French Language as the official language of instruction for Inuit school districts there.
Nunavik means "great land" in the local dialect of Inuktitut and the Inuit inhabitants of the region call themselves Nunavimmiut.

Inuit

InukInuit peopleEskimos
It also has some recognition in Nunatsiavut—the Inuit area in Labrador—following the ratification of its agreement with the government of Canada and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
They displaced the related Dorset culture, called the Tuniit in Inuktitut, which was the last major Paleo-Eskimo culture.

Inuinnaqtun

InnuinaqtunInuinnaqInuinnaqtun language
It is recognised as an official language in Nunavut alongside Inuinnaqtun, and both languages are known collectively as Inuktut.
It is related very closely to Inuktitut, and some scholars, such as Richard Condon, believe that Inuinnaqtun is more appropriately classified as a dialect of Inuktitut.

Iqaluit

Iqaluit, NunavutFrobisher BayIqualuit
The South Baffin dialect (Qikiqtaaluk nigiani, ᕿᑭᖅᑖᓗᒃ ᓂᒋᐊᓂ) is spoken across the southern part of Baffin Island, including the territorial capital Iqaluit.
It was known as Frobisher Bay from 1942 to 1987, after the large bay on the coast of which the city is situated, when the traditional Inuktitut name was restored.

Inukjuak

Inukjuak, QuebecPort HarrisonPort Harrison, Quebec
Itivimuit is associated with Inukjuak, Quebec, and there is a Itivimuit River near the town.
Inukjuak (Inuktitut for The Giant) is a northern village (Inuit community) located on Hudson Bay at the mouth of the Innuksuak River in Nunavik, in the Nord-du-Québec region of northern Quebec, Canada.

Baffin Island

BaffinBaffin LandBaffin Island herds
The South Baffin dialect (Qikiqtaaluk nigiani, ᕿᑭᖅᑖᓗᒃ ᓂᒋᐊᓂ) is spoken across the southern part of Baffin Island, including the territorial capital Iqaluit. The very last Inuit peoples introduced to missionaries and writing were the Netsilik Inuit in Kugaaruk and north Baffin Island.
That year the community voted to restore the Inuktitut name.

Charter of the French Language

Bill 101language legislationQuebec Charter of the French Language
It also has legal recognition in Nunavik—a part of Quebec—thanks in part to the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, and is recognised in the Charter of the French Language as the official language of instruction for Inuit school districts there.
Articles 87, 88 and 89 provide for the use of Amerindic languages and Inuktitut as language of instruction.

Greenlandic language

GreenlandicKalaallisutWest Greenlandic
Though often thought to be a dialect of Greenlandic, Inuktun or Polar Eskimo is a recent arrival in Greenland from the Eastern Canadian Arctic, arriving perhaps as late as the 18th century.
It is closely related to the Inuit languages in Canada such as Inuktitut.

Inuvialuktun

iktIntikutInuit
The term Inuktitut is often used more broadly to include Inuvialuktun and thus nearly all the Inuit dialects of Canada.
It was traditionally subsumed under a broader Inuktitut, and there is no consensus which dialects belong to which language.

Manitoba

MBManitoba, CanadaProvince of Manitoba
It is spoken in all areas north of the tree line, including parts of the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Quebec, to some extent in northeastern Manitoba as well as the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.
In 2010, the provincial government of Manitoba passed the Aboriginal Languages Recognition Act, which gives official recognition to seven indigenous languages: Cree, Dakota, Dene, Inuktitut, Michif, Ojibway and Oji-Cree.

Uvular consonant

Uvularuvular consonantsuvulars
Consonants are arranged with five places of articulation: bilabial, alveolar, palatal, velar and uvular; and three manners of articulation: voiceless stops, voiced continuants and nasals, as well as two additional sounds—voiceless fricatives.
Several other languages, including Inuktitut, Abkhaz, Uyghur and some varieties of Arabic, have a voiced uvular fricative but do not treat it as a rhotic consonant.

Inuktun

Avannarhuarmiutut (North Thule Greenlandic)Inuktun languageNorth Greenlandic
Though often thought to be a dialect of Greenlandic, Inuktun or Polar Eskimo is a recent arrival in Greenland from the Eastern Canadian Arctic, arriving perhaps as late as the 18th century.
The language is an Eskimo–Aleut language and dialectologically it is in between the Greenlandic Kalaallisut and the Canadian Inuktitut, Inuvialuktun or Inuinnaqtun.

Vowel

vowelsvowel heightV
Eastern dialects of Inuktitut have fifteen consonants and three vowels (which can be long or short).
Nearly all languages have at least three phonemic vowels, usually as in Classical Arabic and Inuktitut, though Adyghe and many Sepik languages have a vertical vowel system of.

Kra (letter)

kraĸ
(This alphabet is distinguished by its inclusion of the letter kra, ĸ.) They later travelled to Labrador in the 1800s, bringing the Inuktitut alphabet with them.
Kra (Kʼ / ĸ) is a glyph formerly used to write the Kalaallisut language of Greenland and is now only found in Nunatsiavummiutut, a distinct Inuktitut dialect.

Markoosie Patsauq

Noted literature in Inuktitut has included the novels Harpoon of the Hunter by Markoosie Patsauq, and Sanaaq by Mitiarjuk Nappaaluk.
He is best known for Harpoon of the Hunter, the first published Inuktitut language novel; the novel was written later, but published earlier (1970), than Mitiarjuk Nappaaluk's Sanaaq.

Baker Lake, Nunavut

Baker LakeBaker Lake, Northwest TerritoriesBaker Lake Inuit Heritage Centre
The book ᐃᓕᐊᕐᔪᒃ ᓇᓄᕐᓗ (The Orphan and the Polar Bear) became the first work ever translated into Inuktitut Braille and a copy is held by the Nunavut Territorial Library at Baker Lake, Nunavut.
Baker Lake (Inuktitut syllabics: ᖃᒪᓂᑦᑐᐊᖅ, big lake joined by a river at both ends, Inuktitut: Qamani'tuaq, where the river widens) is a hamlet in the Kivalliq Region, in Nunavut on mainland Canada within Inuit Nunangat.

Mitiarjuk Nappaaluk

Mitiarjuk Attasie Nappaaluk
Noted literature in Inuktitut has included the novels Harpoon of the Hunter by Markoosie Patsauq, and Sanaaq by Mitiarjuk Nappaaluk.
She was most noted for Sanaaq, one of the first Inuktitut language novels; although written earlier, it was published later than Markoosie Patsauq's Harpoon of the Hunter.

James Evans (linguist)

James Evans
The Inuktitut syllabary used in Canada is based on the Cree syllabary devised by the missionary James Evans.
He is best remembered for his claim of the invention of the "syllabic" writing system for Ojibwe and Cree, which was later adapted to other languages such as Inuktitut.

Kugaaruk

Pelly BayArviligjuaqKugaaruk, Nunavut
The very last Inuit peoples introduced to missionaries and writing were the Netsilik Inuit in Kugaaruk and north Baffin Island.
Despite the isolation of the community, the Inuktitut language is declining.