Inuvik

Inuvik, Northwest TerritoriesInuvik, NTInuvik hospitalInuvik SettlementInuvik, CanadaInuvik, NWT
Inuvik (place of man) is a town in the Northwest Territories of Canada within Inuit Nunangat and is the administrative centre for the Inuvik Region.wikipedia
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Aklavik

Aklavik, Northwest TerritoriesAklavik First NationAklavik Range
Inuvik was conceived in 1953 as a replacement administrative centre for the hamlet of Aklavik on the west of the Mackenzie Delta, as the latter was prone to flooding and had no room for expansion. In 1979, with the completion of the Dempster Highway, Inuvik became connected to Canada's highway system, and simultaneously the most northerly town to which one could drive in the summer months — although an ice road through the Mackenzie River delta connects the town to Tuktoyaktuk, on the coast of the Arctic Ocean, and Aklavik, in the winter, and an all-weather road connecting Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk opened in November 2017, replacing that portion of the ice road.
Building conditions at the time considered to be unsuitable (primarily due to flooding) resulted in the development of Inuvik 63 km to the east, meant to entirely replace Aklavik.

Inuvik Region

administrative region of the same nameInuvik
Inuvik (place of man) is a town in the Northwest Territories of Canada within Inuit Nunangat and is the administrative centre for the Inuvik Region.
According to Municipal and Community Affairs the region consists of eight communities with the regional office situated in Inuvik.

Northwest Territories

North-West TerritoriesNTNorth West Territories
Inuvik (place of man) is a town in the Northwest Territories of Canada within Inuit Nunangat and is the administrative centre for the Inuvik Region.
However, Behchokǫ̀, with a population of 1,874, is the largest First Nations community, 1,696 (90.9%), and Inuvik with 3,243 people is the largest Inuvialuit community, 1,315 (40.5%).

Ice road

ice bridgeice roadsduring the winter when it is frozen over
In 1979, with the completion of the Dempster Highway, Inuvik became connected to Canada's highway system, and simultaneously the most northerly town to which one could drive in the summer months — although an ice road through the Mackenzie River delta connects the town to Tuktoyaktuk, on the coast of the Arctic Ocean, and Aklavik, in the winter, and an all-weather road connecting Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk opened in November 2017, replacing that portion of the ice road.
Ice roads, such as the stretch between Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories, Canada, provide an almost level driving surface with few detours several months of the year.

Dempster Highway

Dempster Highway (Yukon Route 5)Hwy 5Northwest Territories Highway 8
In 1979, with the completion of the Dempster Highway, Inuvik became connected to Canada's highway system, and simultaneously the most northerly town to which one could drive in the summer months — although an ice road through the Mackenzie River delta connects the town to Tuktoyaktuk, on the coast of the Arctic Ocean, and Aklavik, in the winter, and an all-weather road connecting Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk opened in November 2017, replacing that portion of the ice road.
The Dempster Highway, also referred to as Yukon Highway 5 and Northwest Territories Highway 8, is a highway in Canada that connects the Klondike Highway in Yukon to Inuvik, Northwest Territories on the Mackenzie River delta.

CFS Inuvik

Naval Radio Station (NRS) Inuvik
Naval Radio Station (NRS) Inuvik, later CFS Inuvik, callsign CFV, was commissioned on 10 September 1963 after operations had been successfully transferred from NRS Aklavik.
Canadian Forces Station Inuvik was a signals intercept facility located near Inuvik, Northwest Territories.

Inuit Nunangat

Inuvik (place of man) is a town in the Northwest Territories of Canada within Inuit Nunangat and is the administrative centre for the Inuvik Region.
Inuvik is the regional centre for the Inuvik Region in the Northwest Territories and serves as a regional seat for the Inuvialuit Settlement Region.

Gwichʼin language

Gwich'inGwich’inGwichʼin
The main language spoken in Inuvik is English, though schools teach and a handful of local people still speak Inuinnaqtun (Inuvialuktun), and Gwich’in.
Gwich'in is spoken primarily in the towns of Inuvik, Aklavik, Fort McPherson, Old Crow, and Tsiigehtchic (formerly Arctic Red River) in the Northwest Territories and Yukon of Canada.

Inuvialuit

InuvialukInuvialuit / SámiInuvialuit people
The school was built in 1959 and the hospital, government offices and staff residences in 1960, when people, including Inuvialuit, Gwich’in (Dene) and Métis, began to live in the community. 63.2% were Inuvialuit (Inuit, predominantly Uummarmiut), 31.0% First Nations and 5.3%; Métis.
Uummarmiutun, spoken by the Uummarmiut of Aklavik and Inuvik, is an Inupiatun dialect but is usually associated with Inuvialuktun.

CHAK (AM)

CHAKCBAKCBIN-FM
Local CBC Radio, CHAK (AM), broadcasts an hour of programming a day in each of these languages.
CHAK is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 860 AM in Inuvik, Northwest Territories.

Tuktoyaktuk

Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest TerritoriesTuktoyuktukPort Brabant
In 1979, with the completion of the Dempster Highway, Inuvik became connected to Canada's highway system, and simultaneously the most northerly town to which one could drive in the summer months — although an ice road through the Mackenzie River delta connects the town to Tuktoyaktuk, on the coast of the Arctic Ocean, and Aklavik, in the winter, and an all-weather road connecting Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk opened in November 2017, replacing that portion of the ice road.
In late 2010, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency announced that an environmental study would be undertaken on a proposed all-weather road between Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk.

National Highway System (Canada)

National Highway SystemCanada's National Highway SystemCanada's highway system
In 1979, with the completion of the Dempster Highway, Inuvik became connected to Canada's highway system, and simultaneously the most northerly town to which one could drive in the summer months — although an ice road through the Mackenzie River delta connects the town to Tuktoyaktuk, on the coast of the Arctic Ocean, and Aklavik, in the winter, and an all-weather road connecting Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk opened in November 2017, replacing that portion of the ice road.

Uummarmiut

63.2% were Inuvialuit (Inuit, predominantly Uummarmiut), 31.0% First Nations and 5.3%; Métis.
The Uummarmiut (, people of the green trees) is the name given to the Inuvialuit who live predominantly in the Mackenzie Delta communities of Aklavik and Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Inuvik (Mike Zubko) Airport

Inuvik (Mike Zubko)InuvikYEV
The main airport is Inuvik (Mike Zubko) Airport.
Inuvik (Mike Zubko) Airport is located 6.5 NM east of Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Arctic Ocean

ArcticArctic SeaArctic coast
In 1979, with the completion of the Dempster Highway, Inuvik became connected to Canada's highway system, and simultaneously the most northerly town to which one could drive in the summer months — although an ice road through the Mackenzie River delta connects the town to Tuktoyaktuk, on the coast of the Arctic Ocean, and Aklavik, in the winter, and an all-weather road connecting Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk opened in November 2017, replacing that portion of the ice road.
In Canada, ships may anchor at Churchill (Port of Churchill) (58.77444°N, -94.19361°W) in Manitoba, Nanisivik (Nanisivik Naval Facility) (73.06889°N, -84.54917°W) in Nunavut, Tuktoyaktuk (69.44278°N, -133.03111°W) or Inuvik (68.36167°N, -133.73056°W) in the Northwest Territories.

Inuvik/Shell Lake Water Aerodrome

There is also a general aviation airport, Inuvik/Shell Lake Water Aerodrome.
Inuvik/Shell Lake Water Aerodrome is located 5 NM south-southeast of Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Canada and is open from June until September.

Inuit

InukInuit peopleEskimos
63.2% were Inuvialuit (Inuit, predominantly Uummarmiut), 31.0% First Nations and 5.3%; Métis.
These schools, in Aklavik, Iqaluit, Yellowknife, Inuvik and Kuujjuaq, brought together young Inuit from across the Arctic in one place for the first time, and exposed them to the rhetoric of civil and human rights that prevailed in Canada in the 1960s.

Our Lady of Victory Church (Inuvik)

Our Lady of Victory ChurchOur Lady Of Victory Church in Inuvik
Inuvik's Our Lady of Victory Church, often called Igloo Church, is a famous landmark in the region.
Our Lady of Victory Church, often called the Igloo Church, is located on Mackenzie Road in downtown Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Hay River, Northwest Territories

Hay RiverHay River (Xátł'odehchee)Hay River, Northwest Territories, Canada
When the Mackenzie River is ice-free, Northern Transportation Company Limited provides a commercial barge service from Hay River, on Great Slave Lake to the regional terminal in Inuvik.
Today the base is the major staging point for the annual sealift along the Mackenzie River, via Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk and the communities of the Arctic Ocean, as far east as Taloyoak, Nunavut and west to Utqiagvik, Alaska.

Sachs Harbour

Sachs Harbour, Northwest Territories
A new hospital opened in early 2003, providing service to an area extending from Sachs Harbour on Banks Island, to Ulukhaktok on Victoria Island, and from Paulatuk into the Sahtu Region including Norman Wells, Tulita, Deline, Fort Good Hope, and Colville Lake.
Bulk supplies of food and other items are brought by barge in the summer months and flights from Inuvik, some 325 mi to the southwest, operate all year, via the Sachs Harbour (David Nasogaluak Jr. Saaryuaq) Airport.

Gwich'in

Gwich’inGwichʼinKutchin
The school was built in 1959 and the hospital, government offices and staff residences in 1960, when people, including Inuvialuit, Gwich’in (Dene) and Métis, began to live in the community. Local Gwich'in are enrolled in the Inuvik Native Band.
Gwichʼin living in Inuvik, Aklavik, Fort McPherson, and Tsiigehtchic harvest woodland caribou but not as much as other caribou.

Great Northern Arts Festival

The Great Northern Arts Festival has been held annually for 10 days in the middle of July since 1989.
The Great Northern Arts Festival is held each year in Inuvik, Northwest Territories.

Utility tunnel

steam tunnelsteam tunnelsutilidor
A distinct feature of Inuvik is the use of "utilidors" – above-ground utility conduits carrying water and sewage – which are covered by corrugated steel.
They can in particular be found in Inuvik, Northwest Territories and Iqaluit, Nunavut.

Mackenzie River

MackenzieMackenzie DeltaMackenzie Valley
Inuvik was conceived in 1953 as a replacement administrative centre for the hamlet of Aklavik on the west of the Mackenzie Delta, as the latter was prone to flooding and had no room for expansion.

Inuvik Native Band

Local Gwich'in are enrolled in the Inuvik Native Band.
The band is located in Inuvik, a mixed community where First Nations, Inuit, and non-Indigenous people live in approximately equal numbers.