Inverted question and exclamation marks

¡¿inverted exclamation markinverted question markSpanish-style inverted question marks¡, ¿inverted markSpanish inverted marksinverted exclamation point¿?
Inverted question marks and exclamation marks (Commonwealth English) or exclamation points (American English) are punctuation marks used to begin interrogative and exclamatory sentences (or clauses), respectively, in written Spanish and sometimes also in languages which have cultural ties with Spanish, such as in older standards of Galician (now it is optional and not recommended) and the Waray language.wikipedia
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Question mark

????interrogation point
The inverted question mark is a punctuation mark written before the first letter of an interrogative sentence or clause to indicate that a question follows.
An interrogative sentence, clause, or phrase begins with an inverted question mark and ends with the question mark, as in:

Exclamation mark

exclamation point!pling
Although it has now become rare, it is correct usage in Spanish to begin a sentence with an opening inverted exclamation mark and end it with a question mark, or vice versa, for statements that are questions but also have a clear sense of exclamation or surprise such as: ¡Y tú quién te crees?
In Spanish, a sentence or clause ending in an exclamation mark must also begin with an inverted exclamation mark (the same also applies to the question mark): ¿Estás loco?

Irony punctuation

irony markpercontation pointrhetorical question mark
In 1668, John Wilkins proposed using the inverted exclamation mark "¡" as a symbol at the end of a sentence to denote irony.
In 1668, John Wilkins, in his famous An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language, proposed using an inverted exclamation mark to punctuate ironic statements.

Spanish orthography

SpanishCastilianizedCastilian Spanish
Spanish orthography
Notable features of Spanish punctuation include the lack of the serial comma and the inverted question and exclamation marks:.

Spanish language

SpanishSpanish-languageCastilian
Inverted question marks and exclamation marks (Commonwealth English) or exclamation points (American English) are punctuation marks used to begin interrogative and exclamatory sentences (or clauses), respectively, in written Spanish and sometimes also in languages which have cultural ties with Spanish, such as in older standards of Galician (now it is optional and not recommended) and the Waray language.
Interrogative and exclamatory clauses are introduced with inverted question and exclamation marks (¿ and ¡, respectively).

Galician language

GalicianGallegoGalician speaking
Inverted question marks and exclamation marks (Commonwealth English) or exclamation points (American English) are punctuation marks used to begin interrogative and exclamatory sentences (or clauses), respectively, in written Spanish and sometimes also in languages which have cultural ties with Spanish, such as in older standards of Galician (now it is optional and not recommended) and the Waray language.
The last review of the official grammar has established that the exclamation and question marks will appear only at the end of the sentence if there is no risk of confusion, thus deprecating the general use of Spanish-like inverted question and exclamation marks.

Interrobang

inverted version of the interrobanginterobangpunctuation mark
Unicode 5.1 also includes, which is an inverted version of the interrobang (also known as a "gnaborretni"), a nonstandard punctuation mark used to denote both excitement and a question in just one glyph.
A reverse and upside down interrobang (combining ¿ and ¡, Unicode character: ⸘), suitable for starting phrases in Spanish, Galician and Asturian, which use inverted question and exclamation marks, is called an "inverted interrobang" or a gnaborretni (interrobang written backwards).

Compose key

composecomposed Compose
With a compose key, for example, + , they can be entered by pressing the compose key and or twice.

GSM 03.38

GSM 7-bit alphabet3GPP TS 23.038GSM seven-bit alphabet

Transformation of text

upside-down textrotated 180°reversed
Punctuation (by use of such characters as the interpunct and the inverted question mark and exclamation point) is mostly covered.

ASLwrite

Sentences are ended by the full stop mark . Questions in written ASL are denoted by eyebrow marks bounding the question not unlike Spanish's "¿ ?."

Esperanto orthography

Esperantox-systemEsperanto alphabet
Question words generally come at the beginning of a question, obviating the need for Spanish-style inverted question marks.

Villa Alegre (TV series)

Villa AlegreVilla AllegreVilla Alegre'' (TV series)
The program had an upbeat, catchy salsa-flavored theme song, which ended with adults and kids shouting "¡Villa Alegre!"

QWERTY

qwerty keyboardUS-International keyboard layoutUS keyboard layout
It includes Ñ for Spanish, Asturian and Galician, the acute accent, the diaeresis, the inverted question and exclamation marks, the superscripted o and a for writing abbreviated ordinal numbers in masculine and feminine in Spanish and Galician, and finally, some characters required only for typing Catalan and Occitan that are Ç, the grave accent and the interpunct (punt volat / punt interior, used in l·l, n·h, s·h; located at Shift-3).

Amtor

VenusVenus seriesCarson of Venus
Punctuation marks are similar to ones on Earth in most respects, although Amtorians also have equivalents to the Spanish inverted marks.

Mojibake

mangledstring of nonsense characterserroneously doubly-encoded UTF-8
á, é, í, ñ, ó, ú, ï, ü, ¡, ¿ in Spanish

Spanish language in the Philippines

SpanishSpanish languagePhilippine Spanish
, of the younger generation of Filipino Hispanophones are following the Spanish orthographic convention of typing letters with diacritic marks (acute accents and diaeresis) as well as the inverted question and exclamation marks and the rest of the special characters and symbols found in Spanish orthography on their US standard layout computer keyboards by using the AltGr key, Modifier key, Code page 437, Code page 850, Microsoft Windows Alt Key Numeric Codes for character shortcuts, or the US-International keyboard layout.

Dan Dion

In May 2010, Dion’s book ¡SATIRISTAS!, co-authored with Paul Provenza, was published by Harper-Collins.

Windows-1250

1250Windows CP1250code page 1250