Ipai language

Anthony Pico, former chairman of the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay

Native American language spoken by the Kumeyaay people of central San Diego County, California.

- Ipai language
Anthony Pico, former chairman of the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay

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Anthony Pico, former chairman of the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay

Kumeyaay

Tribe of Indigenous peoples of the Americas who live at the northern border of Baja California in Mexico and the southern border of California in the United States.

Tribe of Indigenous peoples of the Americas who live at the northern border of Baja California in Mexico and the southern border of California in the United States.

Anthony Pico, former chairman of the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay
Engraving by Arthur Carl Victor Schott, Sorony & Co., 1857
Kumeyaay were displaced to construct the El Capitan Reservoir
Barona Resort Hotel
Valle de Guadalupe, B.C.
Kumeyaay items
Frame of an ‘ewaa
Kumeyaay coiled basket, woven by Celestine Lachapa, 19th century, San Diego Museum of Us
Kumeyaay willow storage basket at the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California cultural museum, Mexicali

According to Margaret Langdon, who is credited with doing much of the early work on documenting the language, the general scholarly consensus recognized three separate languages: Ipai (Iipay) (Northern Kumeyaay), Kumeyaay proper (including the Kamia/Kwaaymii), and Tipai (Southern Kumeyaay) in northern Baja California.

Anthony Pico, former chairman of the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay

Kumeyaay language

Native American language spoken by the Kumeyaay people of southern San Diego and Imperial counties in California.

Native American language spoken by the Kumeyaay people of southern San Diego and Imperial counties in California.

Anthony Pico, former chairman of the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay

A more liberal estimate (including speakers of Ipai and Tipai), supported by the results of the Census 2000, is 110 people in the US, including 15 persons under the age of 18.

Anthony Pico, former chairman of the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay

Tiipai language

Native American language spoken by a number of Kumeyaay (Kumiay) tribes in northern Baja California and southern San Diego County, California.

Native American language spoken by a number of Kumeyaay (Kumiay) tribes in northern Baja California and southern San Diego County, California.

Anthony Pico, former chairman of the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay

In the past, Tipai and its neighbors to the north, Kumeyaay and Ipai, have been considered dialects of a single Diegueño language, but linguists now recognize that they represent at least three distinct languages (for discussion, see Langdon 1990).

Balboa Park, site of the California Pacific International Exposition, in 1935-36

History of San Diego

The written (as opposed to oral) history of the San Diego, California, region began in the present state of California when Europeans first began inhabiting the San Diego Bay region.

The written (as opposed to oral) history of the San Diego, California, region began in the present state of California when Europeans first began inhabiting the San Diego Bay region.

Balboa Park, site of the California Pacific International Exposition, in 1935-36
Kumeyaay natives indigenous to San Diego
Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego
The Ship! The Ship! California is saved! Serra rejoices at the sight of the San Antonio entering San Diego Bay on March 19, 1770, with desperately needed food and supplies.
Panama-California Exposition of 1915-16
Cannery of the International Packing Corporation in 1919
The upper floor of the Hill building, located at 6th Avenue and F Street, was the first location of the San Diego Normal School. Students and staff can be seen in the windows here in 1898. The school would later expand and change names several times before settling on the current name, San Diego State University.
San Diego Convention Center
Honorary Leon Williams Dr., 2900 block of E Street, at its intersection with 30th Street.
The Hillcrest Pride flag, erected in 2012

North of the San Diego river, the Kumeyaay spoke the Ipai dialect, which included the villages of Nipaquay, Jamo, Onap, Ystagua, and Ahmukatlatl.

Yuman–Cochimí languages

The Yuman–Cochimí languages are a family of languages spoken in Baja California, northern Sonora, southern California, and western Arizona.

The Yuman–Cochimí languages are a family of languages spoken in Baja California, northern Sonora, southern California, and western Arizona.

Ipai (a.k.a. 'Iipay, Northern Diegueño)

Sign at Contra Costa Centre Transit Village, an unincorporated community in Contra Costa County, California, north of the city of Walnut Creek.

Ballena, California

Unincorporated community in the Ballena Valley of San Diego County, California.

Unincorporated community in the Ballena Valley of San Diego County, California.

Sign at Contra Costa Centre Transit Village, an unincorporated community in Contra Costa County, California, north of the city of Walnut Creek.

The Ipai name for the mountain was Epank, meaning "whale," and ballena is the Spanish word for "whale."

Kumeyaay woman in front of her traditional house at Campo, photo by Edward Curtis.

El Vallecito

Archaeological site located in the city of La Rumorosa, in the Tecate Municipality, Baja California, Mexico.

Archaeological site located in the city of La Rumorosa, in the Tecate Municipality, Baja California, Mexico.

Kumeyaay woman in front of her traditional house at Campo, photo by Edward Curtis.
Yumas. In: "United States and Mexican Boundary Survey. Report of William H. Emory…" Washington. 1857. Volume I.
Area of Yuman–Cochimí influence
When Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo sailed north he saw several Kumeyaay natives waiting on shore. They had long hair, some in braids and adorned with feathers or shells. Some men wore capes made from the skin of sea otter, seal or deer.
Kumeyaay basket made of willow branches from San Jose de la Zorra, Ensenada, Baja California Mexico. Made for food storage. On display at the Centro de las Investigaciones Culturales Museum of the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexicali

The general scholarly consensus recognizes three separate languages: Ipai, Kumeyaay proper (including the Kamia) and Tipai in northern Baja California (e.g., Langdon 1990).