Iraqi insurgency (2003–2011)

Iraqi insurgencyIraqi insurgentsinsurgentsinsurgentinsurgencyOther Iraqi InsurgentsIraq InsurgencyIraqi insurgency (2003–11)Iraqi resistanceLoyalists
An insurgency began in Iraq after the 2003 US-led invasion, and lasted throughout the ensuing Iraq War (2003–2011).wikipedia
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Iraq War

Operation Iraqi FreedomIraqwar in Iraq
An insurgency began in Iraq after the 2003 US-led invasion, and lasted throughout the ensuing Iraq War (2003–2011).
The conflict continued for much of the next decade as an insurgency emerged to oppose the occupying forces and the post-invasion Iraqi government.

Iraqi insurgency (2003–2006)

Iraqi insurgentsIraqi insurgencyOther Iraqi insurgents
The first phase of the insurgency began shortly after the 2003 invasion and prior to the establishment of the new Iraqi government.
The Iraqi insurgency of May 2003–February 2006 began following the completion of the invasion of Iraq and the toppling of Saddam Hussein's rule in May 2003.

Baghdad

Baghdad, IraqBagdadBaghdād
The invasion phase consisted of a conventionally fought war which concluded with the capture of the Iraq capital Baghdad by U.S. forces. These include Operation Option North and Operation Bayonet Lightning in Kirkuk, Operation Desert Thrust, Operation Abilene and Operation All American Tiger throughout Iraq, Operation Iron Hammer in Baghdad and Operation Ivy Blizzard in Samarra – all in 2003; Operation Market Sweep, Operation Vigilant Resolve and Operation Phantom Fury in Fallujah in 2004; Operation Matador in Anbar, Operation Squeeze Play and Operation Lightning in Baghdad, Operation New Market near Haditha, Operation Spear in Karabillah and the Battle of Tal Afar – all in 2005; Operation Swarmer in Samarra and Operation Together Forward in Baghdad in 2006; and Operation Law and Order in Baghdad, Operation Arrowhead Ripper in Baqouba and Operation Phantom Strike throughout Iraq – all in 2007.
In recent years, the city has been frequently subjected to insurgency attacks.

Iraqi Army

New Iraqi ArmyArmyIraqi forces
With the full-scale eruption of the sectarian civil war in February 2006, many militant attacks in American-controlled central Iraq were directed at the Iraqi police and military forces of the Iraqi government.
Because of the Iraqi insurgency that began shortly after the invasion, the Iraqi Army was later designed to initially be a counter-insurgency force.

Iraqi insurgency (2011–2013)

Iraqi insurgencyIraqi insurgency (post-U.S. withdrawal)Iraqi insurgency (2011–present)
After the withdrawal in December 2011, a renewed wave of sectarian and anti-government insurgency swept Iraq, causing thousands of casualties in 2012.
However, the power vacuum following Saddam's fall, the mismanagement of the occupation and the sectarian policies of various militias led to a lengthy insurgency against U.S., coalition forces and Iraqi government forces as well as widespread sectarian violence between Shias and Sunnis.

2003 invasion of Iraq

invasion of IraqIraq War2003 Iraq War
An insurgency began in Iraq after the 2003 US-led invasion, and lasted throughout the ensuing Iraq War (2003–2011).
Ansar al-Islam was led by the Jordanian-born militant Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, who would later become an important leader in the Iraqi insurgency.

Sectarian violence in Iraq

sectarian violencesectarian civil warviolence
During the height of the Iraq War in 2006 to 2008, the fighting involved both armed conflict against the American-led military coalition, as well as sectarian violence among the different ethnic groups within the population.
Following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, certain elements of the Iraqi insurgency have made a point of targeting Shias in sectarian attacks.

Iraqi Armed Revolutionary Resistance

The Iraqi Armed Revolutionary Resistance ('IARR) is a Marxist insurgent group alleged to be operating in Iraq in 2007.

Mujahideen Shura Council (Iraq)

Mujahideen Shura CouncilMujahedeen Shura CouncilMujahedeen Shura Council of Iraq
Examples of Sunni Islamist groups include Mujahideen Shura Council, the Islamic Army in Iraq, al-Qaeda in Iraq, the United Jihad Factions Council and Jaish al-Rashideen.
The Mujahideen Shura Council (MSC),, was an umbrella organization of at least six Sunni Islamic insurgent groups taking part in the Iraqi insurgency against U.S. and coalition and Iraqi forces: Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn ('al-Qaeda in Iraq'), Jaish al-Ta'ifa al-Mansurah, Katbiyan Ansar Al-Tawhid wal Sunnah, Saray al-Jihad Group, al-Ghuraba Brigades, and al-Ahwal Brigades.

Iraqi Police

Federal PolicepoliceIraqi Federal Police
With the full-scale eruption of the sectarian civil war in February 2006, many militant attacks in American-controlled central Iraq were directed at the Iraqi police and military forces of the Iraqi government.
It became the target of fighters from inside and outside Iraq; thousands of officers have been killed by gunfire and bombings by Iraqi insurgents, foreign terrorists and, in some cases, friendly fire from Coalition troops.

Insurgency

insurgentinsurgentsmilitant
An insurgency began in Iraq after the 2003 US-led invasion, and lasted throughout the ensuing Iraq War (2003–2011).
The Iraq insurgency is one example of a recognized government versus multiple groups of insurgents.

Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri

Izzat Ibrahim ad-Dourial-DouriIzzat al-Douri
Following the execution of Saddam Hussein, Deputy Leader of the Iraqi-cell of the Iraqi-led Ba'ath Party and former Vice President of Iraq Izzat Ibrahim ad-Douri became a leading candidate to succeed him as Leader of the Iraqi Ba'ath Party.
U.S. officials claimed that he was involved in the subsequent Iraqi insurgency against U.S. forces, directing and funding attacks, as well as brokering an alliance between Ba'athist insurgents and militant Islamists.

Tikrit

TagritTikrit, IraqTakrit
Other operations occurred against pockets of the Iraqi army including the capture and occupation of Kirkuk on 10 April, and the attack and capture of Tikrit on 15 April.
However, during the subsequent occupation Tikrit became the scene of a number of insurgent attacks against the occupation forces.

Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad

Tawhid and JihadAl-Tawhid Wal-JihadJama'at al-Tawhid wal Jihad
Zarqawi was considered the head of an insurgent group called Al-Tawhid Wal-Jihad ("Monotheism and Holy War") until his death on 7 June 2006, which according to U.S. estimates numbers in the low hundreds.
During the Iraqi insurgency (2003–11), the group became a decentralized network with foreign fighters and a considerable Iraqi membership.

Mohammed Younis al-Ahmed

Mohammed Younis al-Ahmed al-MuwaliYounis al-Ahmed
One notable leader of the insurgency among nationalist Sunni is former aide to Saddam Hussein and a former regional Ba'ath Party Organiser Mohammed Younis al-Ahmed al-Muwali who has been crossing the border between Iraq and Syria disbursing funds, smuggling weaponry and organising much of the fighting in the central area of Iraq.
A former aide to former President of Iraq and leader Saddam Hussein and a regional Baath Party organiser who it appears was trained in Moscow, following the 2003 Iraq War, he was allegedly one of the leading figures among the Iraqi Insurgency and a major rival to Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri.

H. R. McMaster

H.R. McMasterMcMaster, H. R.Herbert Raymond "H.R." McMaster
However, not all accounts of the battle mention these arrests, and U.S. Army commander Colonel H. R. McMaster said the "vast majority" of Insurgents captured there were "Iraqis and not foreigners."
In 2004, he took command of the 3rd Cavalry Regiment and fought the Iraqi insurgency in Tal Afar.

Investment in post-invasion Iraq

Reconstruction of IraqIraq Reconstruction Management OfficeIraqi reconstruction
The attacks continued during the transitional reconstruction of Iraq, as the Iraqi government tried to establish itself.

Abu Ayyub al-Masri

Abu Hamza al-MuhajirAbu Ayub al-MasriAyyub al-Masri
Abu Ayyub al-Masri, an Egyptian who was trained in Al-Qaeda camps in Afghanistan took his place.
Abu Ayyub al-Masri (أبو أيّوب المصري, ', translation: "Father of Ayyub the Egyptian"; 1967 – 18 April 2010), also known as Abu Hamza al-Muhajir (أبو حمزة المهاجر ', translation: "Father of Hamza the immigrant") and other aliases (see name), was the leader of Al-Qaeda in Iraq during the Iraqi insurgency, following the death of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in June 2006.

Sunni Triangle

By June, an insurgency was underway in central and northern Iraq, especially in an area known as the Sunni Triangle.
After the 2003 invasion of Iraq, the area became a focus of armed Sunni opposition to Coalition rule.

Fedayeen Saddam

FedayeenSaddam FedayeenAshbal Saddam
The Ba'athists include former Ba'ath Party officials, the Fedayeen Saddam, and some former agents of the Iraqi intelligence elements and security services, such as the Mukhabarat and the Special Security Organization.
Many former members joined guerrilla organizations, collectively known as the Iraqi insurgency, that began to form to resist the U.S-led occupation.

Peace Companies

Mahdi ArmyMehdi ArmyMahdi Militia
The Shia militias have presented Nouri al-Maliki with perhaps the greatest conundrum of his administration given the capture of Amarah.
The Mahdi army operated death squads that frequently killed Sunni civilians particularly during the civil war phase of the Iraq war.

Islamic State of Iraq

ISIal-Qaeda in IraqIslamic State
By July 2007 Diyala had fallen under almost total Insurgent control, and had become the headquarters for the Sunni-dominated Islamic State of Iraq, which has issued a proclamation declaring the regional capital Baqubah its capital.
Jama'at participated in the Iraqi insurgency (2003–2011) following the 2003 invasion of Iraq by Western forces, and on 17 October 2004 al-Zarqawi had pledged allegiance to Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda network; and the group became known as Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn (commonly known as al-Qaeda in Iraq).

Second Battle of Fallujah

Operation Phantom FuryBattle of FallujahFallujah
These include Operation Option North and Operation Bayonet Lightning in Kirkuk, Operation Desert Thrust, Operation Abilene and Operation All American Tiger throughout Iraq, Operation Iron Hammer in Baghdad and Operation Ivy Blizzard in Samarra – all in 2003; Operation Market Sweep, Operation Vigilant Resolve and Operation Phantom Fury in Fallujah in 2004; Operation Matador in Anbar, Operation Squeeze Play and Operation Lightning in Baghdad, Operation New Market near Haditha, Operation Spear in Karabillah and the Battle of Tal Afar – all in 2005; Operation Swarmer in Samarra and Operation Together Forward in Baghdad in 2006; and Operation Law and Order in Baghdad, Operation Arrowhead Ripper in Baqouba and Operation Phantom Strike throughout Iraq – all in 2007.
It was led by the U.S. Marines and U.S Army against the Iraqi insurgents in the city of Fallujah and was authorized by the U.S.-appointed Iraqi Interim Government.

Jihad

holy warjihādoffensive jihad
Many of these fighters are Wahhabi fundamentalists who see Iraq as the new "field of jihad" in the battle against U.S. forces.

Islamism

IslamistIslamistspolitical Islam
Many former Ba'athists had adopted an Islamist façade to attract more credibility within the country, and perhaps gain support from outside Iraq.
Originating as the Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad in 1999, ISIL pledged allegiance to al-Qaeda in 2004, participated in the Iraqi insurgency that followed the invasion of Iraq by Western coalition forces in 2003, joined the fight in the Syrian Civil War beginning in 2011, and was expelled from al-Qaeda in early 2014, (which complained of its failure to consult and "notorious intransigence" ).