Irish Americans

IrishIrish-AmericanIrish AmericanIrish immigrantsIrish-AmericansIrish immigrantIrish descentIrish CatholicsIrish CatholicIreland
Irish Americans (Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are an ethnic group comprising Americans who have full or partial ancestry from Ireland.wikipedia
2,983 Related Articles

English Americans

EnglishEnglish AmericanAnglo-American
Three million people separately self-identified as Scotch-Irish, but demographers have long assumed the U.S. Census Bureau self-identification estimate of the Scotch-Irish to be a serious undercount (in part, because along with English and other British ancestries, many Scotch-Irish self-identify as being of "American ancestry").
The English were the top ethnic group, with 66% saying they were a good thing for the United States, followed by the Irish at 62%.

British Americans

British-AmericanBritish AmericanBritish
Three million people separately self-identified as Scotch-Irish, but demographers have long assumed the U.S. Census Bureau self-identification estimate of the Scotch-Irish to be a serious undercount (in part, because along with English and other British ancestries, many Scotch-Irish self-identify as being of "American ancestry").

Southern United States

SouthSouthernAmerican South
The descendants of Scots-Irish settlers had a great influence on the later culture of the Southern United States in particular and the culture of the United States in general through such contributions as American folk music, country and western music, and stock car racing, which became popular throughout the country in the late 20th century.
The Southern ethnic heritage is diverse and includes strong European (mostly English, Italians, Scottish, Scotch-Irish, Irish, German, French, Portuguese and Spanish American), African and some Native American components.

Irish Brigade (Union Army)

Irish Brigade2nd BrigadeIrish Brigade (U.S.)
Many immigrant soldiers formed their own regiments, such as the Irish Brigade.
The Irish Brigade was an infantry brigade, consisting predominantly of Irish Americans, that served in the Union Army in the American Civil War.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
The two groups had little initial interaction in America, as the 18th-century Ulster immigrants were predominantly Protestant and had become settled largely in upland regions of the American interior, while the huge wave of 19th-century Catholic immigrant families settled primarily in the Northeast and Midwest port cities such as Boston, Philadelphia, New York, Buffalo, or Chicago. Small but tight communities developed in growing cities such as Philadelphia, Boston, New York and Providence.
Italians became the largest inhabitants of the North End, Irish dominated South Boston and Charlestown, and Russian Jews lived in the West End.

History of the Irish in Saint Paul

become prolificIrish in Saint PaulJohn J. O'Connor
Cities with large numbers of Irish immigrants included Boston, Philadelphia, and New York, as well as Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Detroit, Chicago, Cleveland, St. Louis, St. Paul, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.
The first Irish to settle in Saint Paul were three soldiers from Fort Snelling who were natives of Ireland.

New York City draft riots

New York Draft RiotsDraft RiotsDraft Riots of 1863
Two years into the war, the conscription law was passed in 1863, and major draft riots erupted in New York.
Initially intended to express anger at the draft, the protests turned into a race riot, with white rioters, predominantly Irish immigrants, attacking black people throughout the city.

Buffalo, New York

BuffaloBuffalo, NYBuffalo, United States
The two groups had little initial interaction in America, as the 18th-century Ulster immigrants were predominantly Protestant and had become settled largely in upland regions of the American interior, while the huge wave of 19th-century Catholic immigrant families settled primarily in the Northeast and Midwest port cities such as Boston, Philadelphia, New York, Buffalo, or Chicago.
In 1855, almost two-thirds of the city's population were foreign-born immigrants, largely a mix of unskilled or educated Irish and Germans Catholics, who began self-segregating in different parts of the city.

Irish Catholics

Irish CatholicCatholicIrish-Catholic
While some argue that the Scotch-Irish should be considered Irish, considering that conversions by Irish Catholics during the Reformation in Ireland to Protestant churches were historically rare, that intermarriage between Protestants and Catholics in both Ireland and in the United States was also historically rare, while interethnic and interdenominational marriage amongst Protestants in Ulster was relatively common, multiple historians have argued instead that the "Scotch-Irish" distinction remains necessary as the Ulster Protestants remain a distinct ethnoreligious group from the Irish Catholics. The first recorded usage of the term was by Elizabeth I of England in 1573 in reference to Gaelic-speaking Scottish Highlanders who crossed the Irish Sea and intermarried with the Irish Catholic natives of Ireland.

Molly Maguires

Molly MaguireMolly Maguire ExecutionsJohn Kehoe
The anthracite Coal Region of northeastern Pennsylvania saw a massive influx of Irish during this time period; conditions in the mines eventually gave rise to groups such as the Molly Maguires.
The Molly Maguires was an Irish 19th-century secret society active in Ireland, Liverpool and parts of the Eastern United States, best known for their activism among Irish-American and Irish immigrant coal miners in Pennsylvania.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
The two groups had little initial interaction in America, as the 18th-century Ulster immigrants were predominantly Protestant and had become settled largely in upland regions of the American interior, while the huge wave of 19th-century Catholic immigrant families settled primarily in the Northeast and Midwest port cities such as Boston, Philadelphia, New York, Buffalo, or Chicago. Small but tight communities developed in growing cities such as Philadelphia, Boston, New York and Providence.
The five largest European ancestries reported in the 2010 Census included Irish (13.0%), Italian (8.3%), German (8.2%), Polish (3.9%), and English (3.1%).

First Transcontinental Railroad

transcontinental railroadPacific Railroadrailroad
However, beginning in the early 19th century, many Irish migrated individually to the interior for work on large-scale infrastructure projects such as canals and, later in the century, railroads.
Most of the semi-skilled workers on the Union Pacific were recruited from the many soldiers discharged from the Union and Confederate armies along with emigrant Irishmen.

African Americans

African AmericanAfrican-Americanblack
In 1831 and 1835, he established free schools for free African American children.
The only self-reported ancestral groups larger than African Americans are the Irish and Germans.

Gaels

GaelicGaelGaelic culture
The first recorded usage of the term was by Elizabeth I of England in 1573 in reference to Gaelic-speaking Scottish Highlanders who crossed the Irish Sea and intermarried with the Irish Catholic natives of Ireland.

Cleveland

Cleveland, OhioCleveland, OHCleveland Ohio
Cities with large numbers of Irish immigrants included Boston, Philadelphia, and New York, as well as Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Detroit, Chicago, Cleveland, St. Louis, St. Paul, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.
Ethnic groups include Germans (15.2%), Irish (10.9%), English (8.7%), Italian (5.6%), Poles (3.2%), and French (3.0%).

New England

Southern New EnglandNorthern New EnglandNew England region
In the East, male Irish laborers were hired by Irish contractors to work on canals, railroads, streets, sewers and other construction projects, particularly in New York state and New England.
By the 1850s, immigrants began working in the mills, especially Irish and French Canadians.

Missouri

MOState of MissouriMissouri, USA
They became the primary cultural group in these areas, and their descendants were in the vanguard of westward movement through Virginia into Tennessee and Kentucky, and thence into Arkansas, Missouri and Texas.
The five largest ancestry groups in Missouri are: German (27.4 percent), Irish (14.8 percent), English (10.2 percent), American (8.5 percent) and French (3.7 percent).

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
The two groups had little initial interaction in America, as the 18th-century Ulster immigrants were predominantly Protestant and had become settled largely in upland regions of the American interior, while the huge wave of 19th-century Catholic immigrant families settled primarily in the Northeast and Midwest port cities such as Boston, Philadelphia, New York, Buffalo, or Chicago. Small but tight communities developed in growing cities such as Philadelphia, Boston, New York and Providence.
By 1900, Germans constituted the largest immigrant group, followed by the Irish, Jews, and Italians.

Kentucky

KYCommonwealth of KentuckyKentuckian
They became the primary cultural group in these areas, and their descendants were in the vanguard of westward movement through Virginia into Tennessee and Kentucky, and thence into Arkansas, Missouri and Texas.
In 1980, before the status of ethnic American was an available option on the official census, the largest claimed ancestries in the commonwealth were English (49.6%), Irish (26.3%), and German (24.2%).

History of the United States Democratic Party

Democratic PartyDemocraticDemocrat
They often became precinct leaders in the Democratic Party Organizations, strongly opposed abolition of slavery, and generally favored preserving the Union in 1860, when they voted for Stephen Douglas.
The rural folk in the South and Midwest were ecstatic, showing an enthusiasm never before seen, but ethnic Democrats (especially Germans and Irish) were alarmed and frightened by Bryan.

Pennsylvania

PACommonwealth of PennsylvaniaPa.
The anthracite Coal Region of northeastern Pennsylvania saw a massive influx of Irish during this time period; conditions in the mines eventually gave rise to groups such as the Molly Maguires.

Tennessee

TNState of TennesseeTenn.
They became the primary cultural group in these areas, and their descendants were in the vanguard of westward movement through Virginia into Tennessee and Kentucky, and thence into Arkansas, Missouri and Texas.
In 2000, the five most common self-reported ethnic groups in the state were: American (17.3%), African American (13.0%), Irish (9.3%), English (9.1%), and German (8.3%).

American ancestry

AmericanAmericansAmerican ethnicity
Three million people separately self-identified as Scotch-Irish, but demographers have long assumed the U.S. Census Bureau self-identification estimate of the Scotch-Irish to be a serious undercount (in part, because along with English and other British ancestries, many Scotch-Irish self-identify as being of "American ancestry").
Irish

Providence, Rhode Island

ProvidenceProvidence, RIProvidence, R.I.
Small but tight communities developed in growing cities such as Philadelphia, Boston, New York and Providence.
Irish immigrants have also had considerable influence on the city's history, with 8% of residents claiming Irish heritage.

Upstate New York

upstateNew YorkUpstate, New York
In upstate New York, the Great Lakes area, the Midwest and the Far West, many became farmers or ranchers.
Residents of English colonial ancestry are common, as well as German, Irish, and Italian, with most metropolitan counties having a similar number of residents from each group.