Iron

FeFe 2+ Fe(III)iron productionFe 3+ iron (Fe)Iron Oreiron(II)elemental ironExtraction of iron
Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from ferrum) and atomic number 26.wikipedia
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Metal

metalsmetal ionsmetal ion
It is a metal that belongs to the first transition series and group 8 of the periodic table.
A metal may be a chemical element such as iron; an alloy such as stainless steel; or a molecular compound such as polymeric sulfur nitride.

Chemical element

elementelementschemical elements
Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from ferrum) and atomic number 26.
Iron is the most abundant element (by mass) making up Earth, while oxygen is the most common element in the Earth's crust.

Iron ore

ironiron mineiron-ore
Iron ores, by contrast, are among the most abundant in the Earth's crust, although extracting usable metal from them requires kilns or furnaces capable of reaching 1500 °C or higher, about 500 °C higher than what is enough to smelt copper.
Iron ores are rocks and minerals from which metallic iron can be economically extracted.

Steel

steel industrysteelworkersteels
In the modern world, iron alloys, such as steel, inox, cast iron and special steels are by far the most common industrial metals, because of their high mechanical properties and low cost.
Steel is an alloy of iron and carbon, and sometimes other elements.

Earth's outer core

outer corecoreEarth's core
It is by mass the most common element on Earth, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core.
Earth's outer core is a fluid layer about 2400 km thick and composed of mostly iron and nickel that lies above Earth's solid inner core and below its mantle.

Cast iron

cast-ironcastiron
In the modern world, iron alloys, such as steel, inox, cast iron and special steels are by far the most common industrial metals, because of their high mechanical properties and low cost.
Cast iron is a group of iron-carbon alloys with a carbon content greater than 2%.

Hemoglobin

haemoglobinoxyhemoglobindeoxyhemoglobin
The body of an adult human contains about 4 grams (0.005% body weight) of iron, mostly in hemoglobin and myoglobin.
Hemoglobin (American English) or haemoglobin (British English), abbreviated Hb or Hgb, is the iron-containing oxygen-transport metalloprotein in the red blood cells (erythrocytes) of almost all vertebrates (the exception being the fish family Channichthyidae ) as well as the tissues of some invertebrates.

Myoglobin

globular proteinsMB
The body of an adult human contains about 4 grams (0.005% body weight) of iron, mostly in hemoglobin and myoglobin.
Myoglobin (symbol Mb or MB) is an iron- and oxygen-binding protein found in the muscle tissue of vertebrates in general and in almost all mammals.

Rust

rustingferruginouscorrosion
However, iron reacts readily with oxygen and water to give brown to black hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust.
Rust is an iron oxide, a usually red oxide formed by the redox reaction of iron and oxygen in the presence of water or air moisture.

Iron oxide

iron oxidesiron hydroxideferruginous
However, iron reacts readily with oxygen and water to give brown to black hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust.
Iron oxides are chemical compounds composed of iron and oxygen.

Human iron metabolism

iron metabolismironiron homeostasis
To maintain the necessary levels, human iron metabolism requires a minimum of iron in the diet.
Human iron metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that maintain human homeostasis of iron at the systemic and cellular level.

Alloy steel

steel alloylow alloy steelLow alloy
In the modern world, iron alloys, such as steel, inox, cast iron and special steels are by far the most common industrial metals, because of their high mechanical properties and low cost.
The simplest steels are iron (Fe) alloyed with carbon (C) (about 0.1% to 1%, depending on type).

Group 8 element

8group 8group 8 elements
It is a metal that belongs to the first transition series and group 8 of the periodic table.
It consists of iron (Fe), ruthenium (Ru), osmium (Os) and hassium (Hs).

Ferrocene

FcFerrocene, (C 5 H 5 ) 2 Feferrocenyl
Iron also forms many coordination compounds; some of them, such as ferrocene, ferrioxalate, and Prussian blue, have substantial industrial, medical, or research applications.
The molecule consists of two cyclopentadienyl rings bound on opposite sides of a central iron atom.

Iron(III)

ferricFe 3+ Fe(III)
Chemically, the most common oxidation states of iron are iron(II) and iron(III).
In chemistry, iron(III) refers to the element iron in its +3 oxidation state.

Abundance of elements in Earth's crust

Earth's crustmost abundant element in the Earth's crustat relatively trace concentrations of parts per million each
It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust.

Iron(II)

ferrous ironFe(II)Fe
Chemically, the most common oxidation states of iron are iron(II) and iron(III).
In chemistry, iron(II) refers to the element iron in its +2 oxidation state.

Ferromagnetism

ferromagneticferromagnetferromagnets
Below its Curie point of 770 °C, α-iron changes from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic: the spins of the two unpaired electrons in each atom generally align with the spins of its neighbors, creating an overall magnetic field.
Ferromagnetism is the basic mechanism by which certain materials (such as iron) form permanent magnets, or are attracted to magnets.

Manganese

Mnmanganese oreMn 2+
The melting and boiling points of iron, along with its enthalpy of atomization, are lower than those of the earlier 3d elements from scandium to chromium, showing the lessened contribution of the 3d electrons to metallic bonding as they are attracted more and more into the inert core by the nucleus; however, they are higher than the values for the previous element manganese because that element has a half-filled 3d subshell and consequently its d-electrons are not easily delocalized.
It is not found as a free element in nature; it is often found in minerals in combination with iron.

Alloy

alloysmetal alloyalloying
The inner core of the Earth is generally presumed to consist of an iron-nickel alloy with ε (or β) structure.
Elemental iron, combined with non-metallic carbon or silicon, produces alloys called steel or silicon steel.

Magnetic field

magnetic fieldsmagneticmagnetic flux density
Below its Curie point of 770 °C, α-iron changes from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic: the spins of the two unpaired electrons in each atom generally align with the spins of its neighbors, creating an overall magnetic field.
The effects of magnetic fields are commonly seen in permanent magnets, which pull on magnetic materials (such as iron) and attract or repel other magnets.

Nickel

NiNi 2+ Nickel (Ni)
The inner core of the Earth is generally presumed to consist of an iron-nickel alloy with ε (or β) structure.
Meteoric nickel is found in combination with iron, a reflection of the origin of those elements as major end products of supernova nucleosynthesis.

Austenite

austeniticAustenitizationaustenizing
As it cools further to 1394 °C, it changes to its γ-iron allotrope, a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure, or austenite.
Austenite, also known as gamma-phase iron (γ-Fe), is a metallic, non-magnetic allotrope of iron or a solid solution of iron, with an alloying element.

Magnet

permanent magnetmagnetspermanent magnets
Impurities, lattice defects, or grain and particle boundaries can "pin" the domains in the new positions, so that the effect persists even after the external field is removed -- thus turning the iron object into a (permanent) magnet.
This magnetic field is invisible but is responsible for the most notable property of a magnet: a force that pulls on other ferromagnetic materials, such as iron, and attracts or repels other magnets.

Symbol (chemistry)

symbolchemical symbolchemical symbols
Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from ferrum) and atomic number 26.