Irony punctuationwikipedia
Irony punctuation is any proposed form of notation used to denote irony or sarcasm in text.
irony markpercontation pointsarcasm markdenote ironyrhetorical question markirony punctuation marksnark marktemherte slaqirony punctuation

Question mark

question mark????
Both marks take the form of a reversed question mark, "؟".
The percontation point is analogous to the irony mark, but those are even more rarely seen.

Sarcasm

sarcasmsarcasticsarcastically
Irony punctuation is any proposed form of notation used to denote irony or sarcasm in text.
Among the oldest and frequently attested are the percontation point—furthered by Henry Denham in the 1580s—and the irony mark—furthered by Alcanter de Brahm in the 19th century.

Marcellin Jobard

Jean Baptiste Ambroise Marcelin Jobard
Among the oldest and most frequently attested is the percontation point proposed by English printer Henry Denham in the 1580s, and the irony mark, used by Marcellin Jobard and French poet Alcanter de Brahm during the 19th century. In 1841, Marcellin Jobard, a Belgian newspaper publisher, introduced an irony mark in the shape of an oversized arrow head with small stem (rather like an ideogram of a Christmas Tree).
In 1841 Jobard proposed in his newspaper adding what he called "extra emotional typographic characters" (including an irony punctuation) which may be considered precursors to present-day emoticons and smileys.

Rhetorical question

rhetorical questionrhetoricallyrhetorically asks
, a reversed question mark later referred to as a rhetorical question mark, was proposed by Henry Denham in the 1580s and was used at the end of a question that does not require an answer—a rhetorical question.
In the 1580s, English printer Henry Denham invented a "rhetorical question mark" for use at the end of a rhetorical question; however, it fell out of use in the 17th century.

Inverted question and exclamation marks

¡¿inverted question and exclamation marks
In 1668, John Wilkins, in his famous An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language, proposed using an inverted exclamation mark to punctuate ironic statements.
In 1668, John Wilkins proposed using the inverted exclamation mark "¡" as a symbol at the end of a sentence to denote irony.

Irony

ironyironicironically
Irony punctuation is any proposed form of notation used to denote irony or sarcasm in text.
For instance, an irony punctuation mark was proposed in the 1580s, when Henry Denham introduced a rhetorical question mark or percontation point, which resembles a reversed question mark.

Punctuation

punctuationpunctuation markpunctuation marks
Written English lacks a standard way to mark irony, and several forms of punctuation have been proposed.

Scare quotes

scare quotesscare quotesoon
A bracketed exclamation point or question mark as well as scare quotes are also sometimes used to express irony or sarcasm. Scare quotes are a particular use of quotation marks.

Poe's law

be mistaken for what it's satirizingunintentionally taken seriously in print

Tilde

tilde~Ĩ
When used in conversations via email or instant messenger it may be used as a sarcasm mark.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Written English lacks a standard way to mark irony, and several forms of punctuation have been proposed.

Henry Denham

Among the oldest and most frequently attested is the percontation point proposed by English printer Henry Denham in the 1580s, and the irony mark, used by Marcellin Jobard and French poet Alcanter de Brahm during the 19th century. , a reversed question mark later referred to as a rhetorical question mark, was proposed by Henry Denham in the 1580s and was used at the end of a question that does not require an answer—a rhetorical question.

Exclamation mark

exclamation markexclamation point!
A bracketed exclamation point or question mark as well as scare quotes are also sometimes used to express irony or sarcasm.

John Wilkins

John WilkinsWilkinsWilkin
In 1668, John Wilkins, in his famous An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language, proposed using an inverted exclamation mark to punctuate ironic statements.

An Essay towards a Real Character, and a Philosophical Language

AnEssayAnPhilosophical LanguageAnessay on philosophical language
In 1668, John Wilkins, in his famous An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language, proposed using an inverted exclamation mark to punctuate ironic statements.

Ideogram

ideogramideographicideograms
In 1841, Marcellin Jobard, a Belgian newspaper publisher, introduced an irony mark in the shape of an oversized arrow head with small stem (rather like an ideogram of a Christmas Tree).

Christmas tree

christmas treeChristmas Treestree
In 1841, Marcellin Jobard, a Belgian newspaper publisher, introduced an irony mark in the shape of an oversized arrow head with small stem (rather like an ideogram of a Christmas Tree).

Hervé Bazin

Hervé Bazin
Hervé Bazin, in his 1966 essay Plumons l'Oiseau (“Let's pluck the bird”), used the Greek letter ψ with a dot below for the same purpose . In the same work, the author proposed five other innovative punctuation marks: the “doubt point”, “conviction point”, “acclamation point”, “authority point”, and “love point”.

Psi (letter)

psiΨψ
Hervé Bazin, in his 1966 essay Plumons l'Oiseau (“Let's pluck the bird”), used the Greek letter ψ with a dot below for the same purpose . In the same work, the author proposed five other innovative punctuation marks: the “doubt point”, “conviction point”, “acclamation point”, “authority point”, and “love point”.

Collectieve Propaganda van het Nederlandse Boek

CPNBCNPBkinderboekenweekgeschenk
In March 2007, the Dutch foundation CPNB (Collectieve Propaganda van het Nederlandse Boek) presented another design of an irony mark, the ironieteken:.

Tom Driberg

Tom DribergDriberg-->
Tom Driberg recommended that ironic statements should be printed in italics that lean the other way to conventional italics.

Quotation mark

quotation markquotation marks
Scare quotes are a particular use of quotation marks.