Irony punctuation

irony markpercontation point(?)denote ironyirony punctuation markrhetorical question marksarcasm marksnark marktemherte slaq
Irony punctuation is any proposed form of notation used to denote irony or sarcasm in text.wikipedia
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Sarcasm

sarcasticsarcasticallysardonic
Irony punctuation is any proposed form of notation used to denote irony or sarcasm in text.
Among the oldest and frequently attested are the percontation point—furthered by Henry Denham in the 1580s—and the irony mark—furthered by Alcanter de Brahm in the 19th century.

Marcellin Jobard

Jean Baptiste Ambroise Marcelin Jobard
Among the oldest and most frequently attested is the percontation point proposed by English printer Henry Denham in the 1580s, and the irony mark, used by Marcellin Jobard and French poet Alcanter de Brahm during the 19th century. In 1841, Marcellin Jobard, a Belgian newspaper publisher, introduced an irony mark in the shape of an oversized arrow head with small stem (rather like an ideogram of a Christmas Tree).
In 1841 Jobard proposed in his newspaper adding what he called "extra emotional typographic characters" (including an irony punctuation) which may be considered precursors to present-day emoticons and smileys.

Irony

ironicironicallydramatic irony
Irony punctuation is any proposed form of notation used to denote irony or sarcasm in text.
For instance, an irony punctuation mark was proposed in the 1580s, when Henry Denham introduced a rhetorical question mark or percontation point, which resembles a reversed question mark.

Rhetorical question

rhetoricallyrhetorically askingrhetorically asks
, a reversed question mark later referred to as a rhetorical question mark, was proposed by Henry Denham in the 1580s and was used at the end of a question that does not require an answer—a rhetorical question.
In the 1580s, English printer Henry Denham invented a "rhetorical question mark" for use at the end of a rhetorical question; however, it fell out of use in the 17th century.

Punctuation

punctuation markpunctuation marksFrench
Written English lacks a standard way to mark irony, and several forms of punctuation have been proposed.
the "irony point" or "irony mark" (point d'ironie: )

Scare quotes

scare quotean ironic qualityquotation marks
A bracketed exclamation point or question mark as well as scare quotes are also sometimes used to express irony or sarcasm. Scare quotes are a particular use of quotation marks.
Irony punctuation

Inverted question and exclamation marks

¡¿inverted exclamation mark
In 1668, John Wilkins, in An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language, proposed using an inverted exclamation mark to punctuate ironic statements. In certain Ethiopic languages, sarcasm and unreal phrases are indicated at the end of a sentence with a sarcasm mark called temherte slaqî or temherte slaq, a character that looks like the inverted exclamation point (U+00A1) .
In 1668, John Wilkins proposed using the inverted exclamation mark "¡" as a symbol at the end of a sentence to denote irony.

Question mark

????interrogation point
Both marks take the form of a reversed question mark, "⸮".
The percontation point is analogous to the irony mark, but those are even more rarely seen.

Interrobang

interobanginverted version of the interrobangpunctuation mark
Interrobang
Irony mark

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Written English lacks a standard way to mark irony, and several forms of punctuation have been proposed.

Henry Denham

Among the oldest and most frequently attested is the percontation point proposed by English printer Henry Denham in the 1580s, and the irony mark, used by Marcellin Jobard and French poet Alcanter de Brahm during the 19th century. , a reversed question mark later referred to as a rhetorical question mark, was proposed by Henry Denham in the 1580s and was used at the end of a question that does not require an answer—a rhetorical question.

Exclamation mark

exclamation point!exclamation marks
A bracketed exclamation point or question mark as well as scare quotes are also sometimes used to express irony or sarcasm.

John Wilkins

WilkinsWilkinBishop Wilkins
In 1668, John Wilkins, in An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language, proposed using an inverted exclamation mark to punctuate ironic statements.

An Essay towards a Real Character, and a Philosophical Language

EssayEssay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical LanguagePhilosophical Language
In 1668, John Wilkins, in An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language, proposed using an inverted exclamation mark to punctuate ironic statements.

Ideogram

ideographicideogramsideograph
In 1841, Marcellin Jobard, a Belgian newspaper publisher, introduced an irony mark in the shape of an oversized arrow head with small stem (rather like an ideogram of a Christmas Tree).

Christmas tree

Christmas Treestreedecorated tree
In 1841, Marcellin Jobard, a Belgian newspaper publisher, introduced an irony mark in the shape of an oversized arrow head with small stem (rather like an ideogram of a Christmas Tree).

Hervé Bazin

Hervé Bazin, in his 1966 essay Plumons l'Oiseau ("Let's pluck the bird"), used the Greek letter ψ with a dot below for the same purpose.

Psi (letter)

psiΨψ
Hervé Bazin, in his 1966 essay Plumons l'Oiseau ("Let's pluck the bird"), used the Greek letter ψ with a dot below for the same purpose.

Collectieve Propaganda van het Nederlandse Boek

CPNBCNPBkinderboekenweekgeschenk
In March 2007, the Dutch foundation CPNB (Collectieve Propaganda van het Nederlandse Boek) presented another design of an irony mark, the ironieteken:.

Tom Driberg

Tom Driberg recommended that ironic statements should be printed in italics that lean the other way from conventional italics.

Quotation mark

quotation marksdouble quotes
Scare quotes are a particular use of quotation marks.

Air quotes

airquotesfinger quotesfinger-quotes
When read aloud, various techniques are used to convey the sense, such as prepending the addition of "so-called" or a similar word or phrase of disdain, using a sarcastic or mocking tone, or using air quotes, or any combination of the above.

Ethiopian Semitic languages

EthiopicEthiopian SemiticEthiopian
In certain Ethiopic languages, sarcasm and unreal phrases are indicated at the end of a sentence with a sarcasm mark called temherte slaqî or temherte slaq, a character that looks like the inverted exclamation point (U+00A1) .

Teletext

digital teletextVideotextbroadcast Teletext
Subtitles, such as in Teletext, sometimes use an exclamation mark within brackets or parentheses to mark sarcasm.

XML

Extensible Markup LanguageExtensible Markup Language (XML).xml
It is common in online conversation among some Internet users to use an XML closing tag:.