Irresistible impulse

irresistible impulse test
In criminal law, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for their actions that broke the law, because they could not control those actions, even if they knew them to be wrong.wikipedia
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John and Lorena Bobbitt

Lorena BobbittJohn Wayne BobbittLorena Bobbit
In 1994, Lorena Bobbitt was found not guilty when her defense argued that an irresistible impulse led her to cut off her husband's penis.
After seven hours of deliberation, the jury found Lorena not guilty due to insanity causing an irresistible impulse to sexually wound John.

Insanity defense

not guilty by reason of insanityinsanitycriminally insane
In criminal law, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for their actions that broke the law, because they could not control those actions, even if they knew them to be wrong.
The test, also called the Product Test, is broader than either the M'Naghten test or the irresistible impulse test.

Diminished responsibility

diminished capacitycapacity for rational thought had been diminishedDiminished capacity in United States law
The Penal Code of the U.S. state of California states (2002), "The defense of diminished capacity is hereby abolished ... there shall be no defense of ... diminished responsibility or irresistible impulse..."
The majority of states have adopted it by statute or case decision, and a minority even recognise broader defenses such as "irresistible impulse".

Anatomy of a Murder

a bookfilm of the same namesoundtrack
Even with such a motivation, getting Manion cleared of murder would be difficult, but Manion claims to have no memory of the event, suggesting that he may be eligible for a defense of irresistible impulse—a version of a temporary insanity defense.

Criminal law

criminalcriminal casepenal law
In criminal law, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for their actions that broke the law, because they could not control those actions, even if they knew them to be wrong.

Defense (legal)

defensedefencedefence counsel
In criminal law, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for their actions that broke the law, because they could not control those actions, even if they knew them to be wrong.

Excuse

exculpationExcuse (legal)justification
In criminal law, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for their actions that broke the law, because they could not control those actions, even if they knew them to be wrong.

Crime

criminalcriminalscriminal offence
In criminal law, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for their actions that broke the law, because they could not control those actions, even if they knew them to be wrong.

Legal liability

liabilityliablecivil liability
In criminal law, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for their actions that broke the law, because they could not control those actions, even if they knew them to be wrong.

Action (philosophy)

actionactionsactivity
In criminal law, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for their actions that broke the law, because they could not control those actions, even if they knew them to be wrong.

Law

legallawslegal theory
In criminal law, irresistible impulse is a defense by excuse, in this case some sort of insanity, in which the defendant argues that they should not be held criminally liable for their actions that broke the law, because they could not control those actions, even if they knew them to be wrong.

Acquittal

acquittednot guiltyacquit
It was added to the M'Naghten rule as a basis for acquittal in the mid 20th century.

Marriage

married couplesopposite-sex married couplesmarried
In 1994, Lorena Bobbitt was found not guilty when her defense argued that an irresistible impulse led her to cut off her husband's penis.

Penis

peniledickcock
In 1994, Lorena Bobbitt was found not guilty when her defense argued that an irresistible impulse led her to cut off her husband's penis.

California Penal Code

Penal CodeCal. Penal CodeState Penal Code
The Penal Code of the U.S. state of California states (2002), "The defense of diminished capacity is hereby abolished ... there shall be no defense of ... diminished responsibility or irresistible impulse..."

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
The Penal Code of the U.S. state of California states (2002), "The defense of diminished capacity is hereby abolished ... there shall be no defense of ... diminished responsibility or irresistible impulse..."

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
The Penal Code of the U.S. state of California states (2002), "The defense of diminished capacity is hereby abolished ... there shall be no defense of ... diminished responsibility or irresistible impulse..."

Court

court of lawcourtscourts of law
The policeman at the elbow test is a test used by some courts to determine whether the defendant was insane when they committed a crime.

Insanity

insanemadnessmad
The policeman at the elbow test is a test used by some courts to determine whether the defendant was insane when they committed a crime.

M'Naghten rules

M'Naghten ruleinsanityM'Naghten standard
It was added to the M'Naghten rule as a basis for acquittal in the mid 20th century.

Police officer

policemanpolice officersofficer
The test asks whether they would have done what they did even if a police officer was standing at their elbow, hence its name.

Elbow

elbow jointelbow-jointelbows
The test asks whether they would have done what they did even if a police officer was standing at their elbow, hence its name.

English law

English common lawEnglishEngland and Wales
In English Law the concept of "irresistible impulse" was developed in the 1960 case R v. Byrne.

Hubert Parker, Baron Parker of Waddington

Lord ParkerLord Parker of WaddingtonHubert Parker
Lord Parker C.J. broadened the definition of "abnormality of mind" to include those lacking "the ability to exercise will-power to control acts in accordance with [their] rational judgment".

Partial defence

Thus it operates only as a partial defence to murder, reducing the charge to manslaughter, and giving the judge discretion as to length of sentence and whether committal would be more appropriate than incarceration.