Isaac Shelby

Issac ShelbyCol. Isaac ShelbyShelby, Isaac, ColShelby
Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750 – July 18, 1826) was the first and fifth Governor of Kentucky and served in the state legislatures of Virginia and North Carolina.wikipedia
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List of governors of Kentucky

Governorgovernor of KentuckyGov
Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750 – July 18, 1826) was the first and fifth Governor of Kentucky and served in the state legislatures of Virginia and North Carolina.
Prior to a 1992 amendment to the state's constitution, the Governor was prohibited from succeeding himself in office, though four men (Isaac Shelby, John L. Helm, James B. McCreary and Happy Chandler) served multiple non-consecutive terms.

Kentucky

KYCommonwealth of KentuckyKentuckian
While governor, he led the Kentucky militia in the Battle of the Thames, an action that was rewarded with a Congressional Gold Medal.
Isaac Shelby, a military veteran from Virginia, was elected its first Governor.

John Sevier

Col. John SevierSevierAmerican politician of the same name
Later in the war, he and John Sevier led expeditions over the Appalachian Mountains against the British forces in North Carolina.
Sevier and Sullivan County militia colonel Isaac Shelby agreed to raise armies and march across the mountains to engage Ferguson.

Battle of Kings Mountain

Battle of King's MountainKings MountainKing's Mountain
He played a pivotal role in the British defeat at the Battle of Kings Mountain.
In response, the Patriot militias led by Benjamin Cleveland, James Johnston, William Campbell, John Sevier, Joseph McDowell and Isaac Shelby rallied for an attack on Ferguson.

United we stand, divided we fall

Together we stand, divided we fallUnited We StandUNITED WE STAND DIVIDED WE FALL
His fondness for John Dickinson's "The Liberty Song" is believed to be the reason Kentucky adopted the state motto "United we stand, divided we fall".
The U.S. state of Kentucky's first governor, Isaac Shelby, was particularly fond of the stanza from "The Liberty Song".

Battle of the Thames

Battle of MoraviantownBattle of ThamesThames
While governor, he led the Kentucky militia in the Battle of the Thames, an action that was rewarded with a Congressional Gold Medal.
He had a small detachment of regulars from the 27th U.S. Infantry and five brigades of Kentucky militia led by Isaac Shelby, the 63 year-old governor of Kentucky and a hero of the American Revolutionary War.

Jackson Purchase (U.S. historical region)

Jackson PurchaseChickasaw Cession of 1818Jackson Purchase of 1818
In his last act of public service, Shelby and Andrew Jackson acted as commissioners to negotiate the Jackson Purchase from the Chickasaw Indian tribe.
The land was ceded after prolonged negotiations in which the United States was represented by Andrew Jackson and Isaac Shelby, while the Chickasaws were represented by their chiefs, head men, and warriors including: Levi and George Colbert, Chinubby, and Tishomingo.

Battle of Musgrove Mill

Battle of Musgrove's MillBattle of Musgrove’s MillMusgrove Mill
Shelby and Clarke elected not to pursue the British fleeing the Battle of Musgrove Mill.
On the evening of August 18, two hundred mounted Patriot partisans under joint command of Colonels Isaac Shelby, James Williams, and Elijah Clarke prepared to raid a Loyalist camp at Musgrove’s Mill, which controlled the local grain supply and guarded a ford of the Enoree River.

Evan Shelby

Shelby, Evan, ColColonel Evan Shelby, Sr.Evan and Letitia (Cox) Shelby
He was the third child and second son of Evan and Letitia (Cox) Shelby, who immigrated from Tregaron, Wales, in 1735.
Their son Isaac Shelby was later the governor of Kentucky.

Patrick Ferguson

PatrickMajor Patrick FergusonBritish Major Patrick Ferguson
This unit was pursued by British Major Patrick Ferguson.
On the evening of 18 August 1780 two hundred mounted Patriot partisans under joint command of Colonels Isaac Shelby, James Williams, and Elijah Clarke prepared to raid a Loyalist camp at Musgrove’s Mill, which controlled the local grain supply and guarded a ford of the Enoree River.

James Garrard

Governor James Garrard
(James Garrard had been permitted to serve consecutive terms in 1796 and 1800 by special legislative exemption.)
In 1795, he sought to succeed Isaac Shelby as governor.

Gabriel Slaughter

Gabriel Slaughter was the favorite choice for governor of Kentucky in 1812.
With the War of 1812 looming at the end of his tenure, Slaughter ran for governor against Isaac Shelby, the state's first governor and a noted military leader.

Centre College

CentreCentre (KY)Norton Center for the Arts
He also served as the first president of the Kentucky Agricultural Society in 1818 and was chairman of the first board of trustees of Centre College in 1819.
Auspiciously, the legislature placed many of Kentucky's most prominent citizens in charge of Centre College's Board of Trustees, with Isaac Shelby, the Commonwealth's first governor, serving as chair.

James Wilkinson

General James WilkinsonGeneral WilkinsonAnn Biddle
During these conventions he helped thwart James Wilkinson's scheme to align Kentucky with the Spanish.
Wilkinson asked for and received a pension of $7,000 from Miró, while requesting pensions on behalf of several prominent Kentuckians, including: Harry Innes, Benjamin Sebastian, John Brown, Caleb Wallace, Benjamin Logan, Isaac Shelby, George Muter, George Nicholas, and even Humphrey Marshall (who at one time was a bitter rival of Wilkinson's).

Shelby County, Alabama

ShelbyShelby CountyShelby Counties
The county is named in honor of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky from 1792 to 1796 and again from 1812 to 1816.

Shelby County, Indiana

Shelby CountyShelbyIndiana
It was named for Gen. Isaac Shelby, who defeated the British at the Battle of Kings Mountain in the Revolutionary War.

Shelby County, Illinois

ShelbyShelby CountyIllinois
It was named in honor of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky and participant in the American Revolutionary War.

Transylvania Colony

Transylvania CompanyTransylvania PurchaseTransylvania
After his unit was disbanded, Shelby surveyed for the Transylvania Company, a land company that purchased much of present-day Kentucky from the Cherokees in a deal later invalidated by the government of Virginia.

Shelby County, Tennessee

Shelby CountyShelbyShelby County Courthouse
The county was named for Governor Isaac Shelby (1750–1826) of Kentucky.

Shelby County, Iowa

ShelbyShelby CountyIowa
Its name is in honor of Isaac Shelby, the first Governor of Kentucky.

Shelby County, Missouri

ShelbyShelby CountyMissouri
The county was organized January 2, 1835, and named for Governor Isaac Shelby of Kentucky.

Shelby County, Ohio

Shelby CountyShelbySidney, OH Micropolitan Statistical Area
Its name honors Isaac Shelby, former governor of Kentucky.

Shelby County, Kentucky

Shelby CountyShelby Shelby County, Kentucky
The county was founded in 1792 and named for Isaac Shelby, the first Governor of Kentucky.

Shelby County, Texas

ShelbyShelby CountyShelby (TX)
It is named for Isaac Shelby, a soldier in the American Revolution who became the first governor of Kentucky.

Ephraim McDowell

American physician and surgeon of the same nameDr. Ephraim McDowell
Their eldest daughter, Sarah, married Dr. Ephraim McDowell, and the youngest daughter, Letitia, married future Kentucky secretary of state Charles Stewart Todd.
In 1802, McDowell married Sarah Shelby, daughter of Isaac Shelby, war hero and twice governor of Kentucky.