Isang Yun

Yun I-sangYun IsangISANGYUNYun
Isang Yun, also spelled Yun I-sang (17 September 1917 – 3 November 1995), was a Korean-born composer who made his later career in West Germany.wikipedia
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Tongyeong

ChungmuTongyeong-siTongyoung
Yun was born in Sancheong, Korea (in present-day South Korea) in 1917, the son of poet Yun Ki-hyon and his family moved to Tongyeong when he was three years old.
Famous people associated with the city include Yi Sun-sin, whose headquarters were located there, and Yun Isang, a noted 20th-century composer.

Tomojirō Ikenouchi

Tomojiro Ikenouchi
In the mid-1930s, he studied briefly at the Osaka College of Music, and from 1938 composition under Tomojiro Ikenouchi in Tokyo.
His notable students include Isang Yun, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Toshiro Mayuzumi, Maki Ishii, Shin-ichiro Ikebe, Makoto Shinohara, Akira Miyoshi, Akio Yashiro, Roh Ogura, Kōhei Tanaka, Teizo Matsumura, Masato Uchida and Ryohei Hirose.

Boris Blacher

Blacher200 000 TalerBlacher, Boris
At the Paris Conservatory (1956–7) he studied composition under Tony Aubin and Pierre Revel, and West Berlin (1957–9), and at the Musikhochschule Berlin (today the Berlin University of the Arts) under Boris Blacher, Josef Rufer, and Reinhard Schwarz-Schilling.
His students include Aribert Reimann, Isang Yun, Maki Ishii, Fritz Geißler, Giselher Klebe, Heimo Erbse, Richard Aaker Trythall, Klaus Huber, Gottfried von Einem, Kalevi Aho and Richard Wernick.

Berlin University of the Arts

Universität der Künste BerlinUniversität der KünsteBerlin Hochschule für Musik
At the Paris Conservatory (1956–7) he studied composition under Tony Aubin and Pierre Revel, and West Berlin (1957–9), and at the Musikhochschule Berlin (today the Berlin University of the Arts) under Boris Blacher, Josef Rufer, and Reinhard Schwarz-Schilling.

Heinz Holliger

Holliger
A worldwide petition led by Guenter Freudenberg and Francis Travis was presented to the South Korean government, signed by approximately 200 artists, including Igor Stravinsky, Herbert von Karajan, Luigi Dallapiccola, Hans Werner Henze, Heinz Holliger, Mauricio Kagel, Joseph Keilberth, Otto Klemperer, György Ligeti, Arne Mellnäs, Per Nørgård, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Bernd Alois Zimmermann. Two concerts with works of Isang Yun had been performed in Seoul (1982) by Heinz Holliger, Ursula Holliger, and Francis Travis, later by Roswitha Staege and Hans Zender.
He has become one of the world's most celebrated oboists, and many composers (including Olivier Messiaen, Luciano Berio, Elliott Carter, Frank Martin, Hans Werner Henze, Witold Lutosławski, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Isang Yun) have written works for him.

Toshio Hosokawa

HosokawaHosokawa, Toshio
Among his students are Kazuhisa Akita, Jolyon Brettingham Smith, In-Chan Choe, Conrado del Rosario, Raymond Deane, Francisco F. Feliciano, Masanori Fujita, Keith Gifford, Holger Groschopp, Toshio Hosokawa, Sukhi Kang, Chung-Gil Kim, Wolfgang Klingt, Erwin Koch-Raphael, Isao Matsushita, Masahiro Miwa, Hwang-Long Pan, Martin Christoph Redel, Byong-Dong Paik, Bernfried Pröve, Takehito Shimazu, Minako Tanahashi, Masaru Tanaka, Michail Travlos, Jürgen Voigt.
He first studied piano and composition in Tokyo, then from 1976 with Yun Isang at the Berlin University of the Arts.

Reinhard Schwarz-Schilling

At the Paris Conservatory (1956–7) he studied composition under Tony Aubin and Pierre Revel, and West Berlin (1957–9), and at the Musikhochschule Berlin (today the Berlin University of the Arts) under Boris Blacher, Josef Rufer, and Reinhard Schwarz-Schilling.
One of his most prominent pupils was Isang Yun.

Raymond Deane

Among his students are Kazuhisa Akita, Jolyon Brettingham Smith, In-Chan Choe, Conrado del Rosario, Raymond Deane, Francisco F. Feliciano, Masanori Fujita, Keith Gifford, Holger Groschopp, Toshio Hosokawa, Sukhi Kang, Chung-Gil Kim, Wolfgang Klingt, Erwin Koch-Raphael, Isao Matsushita, Masahiro Miwa, Hwang-Long Pan, Martin Christoph Redel, Byong-Dong Paik, Bernfried Pröve, Takehito Shimazu, Minako Tanahashi, Masaru Tanaka, Michail Travlos, Jürgen Voigt.
With a DAAD scholarship, Deane continued his studies with Isang Yun in Berlin.

Jolyon Brettingham Smith

Among his students are Kazuhisa Akita, Jolyon Brettingham Smith, In-Chan Choe, Conrado del Rosario, Raymond Deane, Francisco F. Feliciano, Masanori Fujita, Keith Gifford, Holger Groschopp, Toshio Hosokawa, Sukhi Kang, Chung-Gil Kim, Wolfgang Klingt, Erwin Koch-Raphael, Isao Matsushita, Masahiro Miwa, Hwang-Long Pan, Martin Christoph Redel, Byong-Dong Paik, Bernfried Pröve, Takehito Shimazu, Minako Tanahashi, Masaru Tanaka, Michail Travlos, Jürgen Voigt.
He then went on to study philosophy at the University of Cambridge as well as musicology and composition at Heidelberg and Berlin, where he was a pupil of the Korean-born composer Isang Yun.

Ursula Holliger

Two concerts with works of Isang Yun had been performed in Seoul (1982) by Heinz Holliger, Ursula Holliger, and Francis Travis, later by Roswitha Staege and Hans Zender.
She was one of the most important harpists, particularly in the field of contemporary music, where she played and created many works dedicated to her or her husband: Elliott Carter (Trilogy, 1992; Mosaic, 2004), Alberto Ginastera (Concerto), Henze's Double concerto, 1966), André Jolivet (Controversia, 1969), Witold Lutosławski's Double Concerto, 1980), Ernst Křenek (Kitharaulos, 1972), Frank Martin's Petite symphonie concertante, 1945), Alfred Schnittke (Concerto for oboe and harp, 1970 Eucalypts I, 1970), Isang Yun (Double concerto for oboe and harp, Gong-Hu, In balance, 1987), Tōru Takemitsu (Concerto for oboe and harp) and Heinz Holliger (Mobile, 1962; Trio, 1966; Praeludium I et II 1987).

Isang Yun Competition

ISANGYUN CompetitionCompetition
It commemorates Isang Yun (1917–1995), a Korean composer who was born in Tongyeong and later settled in Germany.

Tongyeong International Music Festival

TIMFTongyeong Festival OrchestraTongyeong International Music Festival (통영국제음악제) Foundation
The origin of this festival results from the spirit to commemorate Isang Yun (윤이상; 1917–1995), a world-renowned composer who was born in Sancheong near Tongyeong and lived the latter part of life in Berlin, Germany.

Koreans in Germany

Korean44,864German woman of Korean descent
In 1967, South Korea forcibly extradited, without the consent of the West German government, a number of Koreans suspected of spying for the North, the most famous of whom was composer and later German citizen Isang Yun.

Shin Suk-ja

Oh Hae-won
When Oh's wife Shin Suk-ja and her little daughters were imprisoned in Yodok camp, Yun helped them and took photos and a tape from North Korea to Berlin (for further details and Mr. Yun's own comments see the website of International Isang Yun Society).
He was influenced in this by a number of famous South Korean leftists in Germany, including Song Du-yul and Yun Isang; they later suggested that he could help his motherland by working as an economist in North Korea.

Oh Kil-nam

Oh Kil-nam has said that Yun persuaded him to relocate to North Korea with his family.
He was influenced in this by a number of famous South Korean leftists in Germany, including Song Du-yul and Yun Isang; they later suggested that he could help his motherland by working as an economist in North Korea.

Goethe Medal

Goethe-MedailleGoethe Medal.Goethemedaille für Kunst und Wissenschaft

Composer

music composercomposedmusic
Isang Yun, also spelled Yun I-sang (17 September 1917 – 3 November 1995), was a Korean-born composer who made his later career in West Germany.

Sancheong County

Sancheong
Yun was born in Sancheong, Korea (in present-day South Korea) in 1917, the son of poet Yun Ki-hyon and his family moved to Tongyeong when he was three years old.

Osaka College of Music

In the mid-1930s, he studied briefly at the Osaka College of Music, and from 1938 composition under Tomojiro Ikenouchi in Tokyo.

Tokyo

Tokyo, JapanTokyo MetropolisTōkyō
In the mid-1930s, he studied briefly at the Osaka College of Music, and from 1938 composition under Tomojiro Ikenouchi in Tokyo.

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
After Japan entered World War II, he moved back to Korea and participated in the Korean independence movement.

Korean independence movement

Korean independence activistanti-Japanese struggleKorean independence
After Japan entered World War II, he moved back to Korea and participated in the Korean independence movement.

Empire of Japan

JapaneseJapanImperial Japan
He was captured and imprisoned by the Japanese in 1943.

Orphanage

orphanagesOrphan Asylumchildren's home
After the war, he did welfare work, establishing an orphanage for war orphans, and teaching music in Tongyeong and Busan.

Busan

PusanBusan, South KoreaBusan Metropolitan City
After the war, he did welfare work, establishing an orphanage for war orphans, and teaching music in Tongyeong and Busan.