Ish-bosheth

IshbaalEsh-baalEshbaʿalIshbosheth
According to the Hebrew Bible, Ish-bosheth (, Ishboshet), also called Eshbaal (, Eshbaal; also Ashbaal or Ishbaal), was one of the four sons of King Saul and was chosen as the second king over the Kingdom of Israel, which then consisted of all the Twelve Tribes of Israel, after the death of his father and three brothers at the Battle of Mount Gilboa.wikipedia
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Abner

Abner ben Ner
In the biblical story, Ish-bosheth was proclaimed king over Israel by Abner, the captain of Saul's army, at Mahanaim in Transjordan, after his father and brothers were slain in the battle of Gilboa . Ish-bosheth was 40 years old at this time and reigned for two years . However, after the death of King Saul, the tribe of Judah seceded from the rule of the House of Saul by proclaiming David as its king, and war ensued . David's faction eventually prevailed against Ish-bosheth's, but the war did not come to a close until Abner joined David.
Seizing the youngest but only surviving of Saul's sons, Ish-bosheth, Abner set him up as king over Israel at Mahanaim, east of the Jordan.

Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy)

Kingdom of IsraelIsraelUnited Kingdom of Israel
According to the Hebrew Bible, Ish-bosheth (, Ishboshet), also called Eshbaal (, Eshbaal; also Ashbaal or Ishbaal), was one of the four sons of King Saul and was chosen as the second king over the Kingdom of Israel, which then consisted of all the Twelve Tribes of Israel, after the death of his father and three brothers at the Battle of Mount Gilboa.
His heir, Ishbaal, rules for only two years before being assassinated.

Saul

King Saulbattle of GilboaKing Saul of Israel
In the biblical story, Ish-bosheth was proclaimed king over Israel by Abner, the captain of Saul's army, at Mahanaim in Transjordan, after his father and brothers were slain in the battle of Gilboa . Ish-bosheth was 40 years old at this time and reigned for two years . However, after the death of King Saul, the tribe of Judah seceded from the rule of the House of Saul by proclaiming David as its king, and war ensued . David's faction eventually prevailed against Ish-bosheth's, but the war did not come to a close until Abner joined David. According to the Hebrew Bible, Ish-bosheth (, Ishboshet), also called Eshbaal (, Eshbaal; also Ashbaal or Ishbaal), was one of the four sons of King Saul and was chosen as the second king over the Kingdom of Israel, which then consisted of all the Twelve Tribes of Israel, after the death of his father and three brothers at the Battle of Mount Gilboa.
The succession to his throne was contested by Ish-bosheth, his only surviving son, and his son-in-law David, who eventually prevailed.

Tribe of Judah

JudahTribes of Judahhouse of Judah
In the biblical story, Ish-bosheth was proclaimed king over Israel by Abner, the captain of Saul's army, at Mahanaim in Transjordan, after his father and brothers were slain in the battle of Gilboa . Ish-bosheth was 40 years old at this time and reigned for two years . However, after the death of King Saul, the tribe of Judah seceded from the rule of the House of Saul by proclaiming David as its king, and war ensued . David's faction eventually prevailed against Ish-bosheth's, but the war did not come to a close until Abner joined David.
However, after the death of Ish-bosheth, Saul's son and successor to the throne of Israel, all the other Israelite tribes made David, who was then the king of Judah, king of a re-united Kingdom of Israel.

David

King DavidDavid and GoliathDavidic
In the biblical story, Ish-bosheth was proclaimed king over Israel by Abner, the captain of Saul's army, at Mahanaim in Transjordan, after his father and brothers were slain in the battle of Gilboa . Ish-bosheth was 40 years old at this time and reigned for two years . However, after the death of King Saul, the tribe of Judah seceded from the rule of the House of Saul by proclaiming David as its king, and war ensued . David's faction eventually prevailed against Ish-bosheth's, but the war did not come to a close until Abner joined David.
David is described in the Hebrew Bible as the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah after Saul and Ish-bosheth.

Rechab

Ish-bosheth was assassinated by two of his own army-captains, Rechab and Baanah, who expected a reward from David because of this.
One of the two "captains of bands" whom Saul's son Ish-bosheth took into his service, and who conspired to kill him. (2 Samuel 4:2)

Michal

Later, at the conclusion of the war with Ishbosheth, David's terms for peace required that Michal be returned to him, and Ish-bosheth complied . After Abner's death, Ish-bosheth seems to have given up hope of retaining power.
Later, when David became king of Judah and Ish-bosheth (Michal's brother, and Saul's son) was king of Israel, David demanded her return to him in return for peace between them.

List of minor Old Testament figures, A–K

AdahHobabBecher
Ish-bosheth was assassinated by two of his own army-captains, Rechab and Baanah, who expected a reward from David because of this.
One of Ish-bosheth's army captains (2 Samuel 4:2)

Mahanaim

In the biblical story, Ish-bosheth was proclaimed king over Israel by Abner, the captain of Saul's army, at Mahanaim in Transjordan, after his father and brothers were slain in the battle of Gilboa . Ish-bosheth was 40 years old at this time and reigned for two years . However, after the death of King Saul, the tribe of Judah seceded from the rule of the House of Saul by proclaiming David as its king, and war ensued . David's faction eventually prevailed against Ish-bosheth's, but the war did not come to a close until Abner joined David.
In the Biblical narrative, around the start of the United Monarchy, the city was a stronghold that had been adapted to serve as a sanctuary for important fugitives (2 Samuel 18:2); the narrative states that after King Saul died, Abner, the commander of Saul’s army, established Saul’s son, Ish-bosheth, in Mahanaim as king of Israel (2 Samuel 2:8).

Books of Samuel

1 Samuel2 SamuelSamuel
He is almost exclusively called Ish-bosheth in the Books of Samuel in the Hebrew Bible:
The elders of Judah anoint David as king, but in the north Saul's son Ish-bosheth, or Ishbaal, rules over the northern tribes.

Tribe of Ephraim

EphraimEphraimitesEphrem
:"Now Abner the son of Ner, captain of Saul's host, had taken Ish-bosheth the son of Saul, and brought him over to Mahanaim; and he made him king over Gilead, and over the Ashurites, and over Jezreel, and over Ephraim, and over Benjamin, and over all Israel. Ish-bosheth Saul's son was forty years old when he began to reign over Israel, and he reigned two years."
After the death of Ishbosheth, Saul's son and successor to the throne of Israel, the Tribe of Ephraim joined the other northern Israelite tribes in making David, who was then the king of Judah, the king of a reunited Kingdom of Israel.

Tribe of Benjamin

BenjaminBenjamiteBenjamites
:"Now Abner the son of Ner, captain of Saul's host, had taken Ish-bosheth the son of Saul, and brought him over to Mahanaim; and he made him king over Gilead, and over the Ashurites, and over Jezreel, and over Ephraim, and over Benjamin, and over all Israel. Ish-bosheth Saul's son was forty years old when he began to reign over Israel, and he reigned two years."
After Saul died, all the tribes other than Judah remained loyal to the House of Saul and to Ish-bosheth, Saul's son and successor to the throne of Israel, but war ensued between the House of Saul and the House of David.

Tribe of Asher

Asherof Asher
:"Now Abner the son of Ner, captain of Saul's host, had taken Ish-bosheth the son of Saul, and brought him over to Mahanaim; and he made him king over Gilead, and over the Ashurites, and over Jezreel, and over Ephraim, and over Benjamin, and over all Israel. Ish-bosheth Saul's son was forty years old when he began to reign over Israel, and he reigned two years."
After the death of Saul, all the tribes other than Judah remained loyal to the House of Saul, and followed his son Ish-bosheth, but after Ish-bosheth's death, the Tribe of Asher joined the other northern Israelite tribes in making David, who was then the king of Judah, king of a re-united Kingdom of Israel.

Hebrew Bible

biblicalBibleHebrew
According to the Hebrew Bible, Ish-bosheth (, Ishboshet), also called Eshbaal (, Eshbaal; also Ashbaal or Ishbaal), was one of the four sons of King Saul and was chosen as the second king over the Kingdom of Israel, which then consisted of all the Twelve Tribes of Israel, after the death of his father and three brothers at the Battle of Mount Gilboa. He is almost exclusively called Ish-bosheth in the Books of Samuel in the Hebrew Bible:

Twelve Tribes of Israel

tribes of Israel12 tribes of Israeltwelve tribes
According to the Hebrew Bible, Ish-bosheth (, Ishboshet), also called Eshbaal (, Eshbaal; also Ashbaal or Ishbaal), was one of the four sons of King Saul and was chosen as the second king over the Kingdom of Israel, which then consisted of all the Twelve Tribes of Israel, after the death of his father and three brothers at the Battle of Mount Gilboa.

Transjordan in the Bible

Transjordaneastterritory
In the biblical story, Ish-bosheth was proclaimed king over Israel by Abner, the captain of Saul's army, at Mahanaim in Transjordan, after his father and brothers were slain in the battle of Gilboa . Ish-bosheth was 40 years old at this time and reigned for two years . However, after the death of King Saul, the tribe of Judah seceded from the rule of the House of Saul by proclaiming David as its king, and war ensued . David's faction eventually prevailed against Ish-bosheth's, but the war did not come to a close until Abner joined David.

High treason

treasontraitorsConspiracy to Commit High Treason
David, however, refused to give any commendation for high treason; he had both killers hanged with their hands and feet cut off.

Hebron

el-KhulilHebron/Al-Khalil Old TownHalil
Ish-bosheth was buried in Abner's grave at Hebron.

Hebrew language

HebrewHeb.Hebrew-language
The names Ish-bosheth and Eshbaal have ambiguous meanings in the original Hebrew.

Names of God in Judaism

GodHashemnames of God
Critical scholarship suggests that Bosheth was a substitute for Ba'al, beginning when Ba'al became an unspeakable word; as (in the opposite direction) Adonai became substituted for the ineffable Tetragrammaton (see taboo deformation).

Tetragrammaton

YHWHGodYahweh
Critical scholarship suggests that Bosheth was a substitute for Ba'al, beginning when Ba'al became an unspeakable word; as (in the opposite direction) Adonai became substituted for the ineffable Tetragrammaton (see taboo deformation).

Euphemism

euphemisticeuphemisticallyeuphemisms
Critical scholarship suggests that Bosheth was a substitute for Ba'al, beginning when Ba'al became an unspeakable word; as (in the opposite direction) Adonai became substituted for the ineffable Tetragrammaton (see taboo deformation).

List of minor Old Testament figures, L–Z

ZillahRoshNer
:"Now Abner the son of Ner, captain of Saul's host, had taken Ish-bosheth the son of Saul, and brought him over to Mahanaim; and he made him king over Gilead, and over the Ashurites, and over Jezreel, and over Ephraim, and over Benjamin, and over all Israel. Ish-bosheth Saul's son was forty years old when he began to reign over Israel, and he reigned two years."

Jezreel (city)

JezreelJezreelite Jezreel
:"Now Abner the son of Ner, captain of Saul's host, had taken Ish-bosheth the son of Saul, and brought him over to Mahanaim; and he made him king over Gilead, and over the Ashurites, and over Jezreel, and over Ephraim, and over Benjamin, and over all Israel. Ish-bosheth Saul's son was forty years old when he began to reign over Israel, and he reigned two years."