Isis

Cult of Isissun disk between two cows horns above her headan Egyptian goddessAncient Egyptian goddessancient goddess IsisAsetEgyptian goddess IsisEgyptian goddess of health, marriage and loveEgyptian Isis statueIsaic
Isis ( Ēse; Isis; Meroitic: Wos[a] or Wusa) was a major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world.wikipedia
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Osiris myth

Myth of Osiris and IsisLegend of Osiris and Isislong-held royal Egyptian practice
2686–2181 BCE) as one of the main characters of the Osiris myth, in which she resurrects her slain husband, the divine king Osiris, and produces and protects his heir, Horus. The cycle of myth surrounding Osiris's death and resurrection was first recorded in the Pyramid Texts and grew into the most elaborate and influential of all Egyptian myths.
Meanwhile, Osiris's wife Isis restores her husband's body, allowing him to posthumously conceive their son, Horus.

Ancient Egyptian deities

deityEgyptian pantheonEgyptian god
Isis ( Ēse; Isis; Meroitic: Wos[a] or Wusa) was a major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world.
In different eras, various gods were said to hold the highest position in divine society, including the solar deity Ra, the mysterious god Amun, and the mother goddess Isis.

Osiris

OsirianAserOsirian Mysteries
2686–2181 BCE) as one of the main characters of the Osiris myth, in which she resurrects her slain husband, the divine king Osiris, and produces and protects his heir, Horus.
Osiris was at times considered the eldest son of the god Geb and the sky goddess Nut, as well as being brother and husband of Isis, with Horus being considered his posthumously begotten son.

Ancient Egyptian religion

Egyptianancient Egyptianreligion
Isis ( Ēse; Isis; Meroitic: Wos[a] or Wusa) was a major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world.
At various times, certain gods became preeminent over the others, including the sun god Ra, the creator god Amun, and the mother goddess Isis.

Mysteries of Isis

mystery cultcult of Isisinitiation ceremonies
Her following developed distinctive festivals such as the Navigium Isidis, as well as initiation ceremonies resembling those of other Greco-Roman mystery cults.
The mysteries of Isis were religious initiation rites performed in the cult of the goddess Isis in the Greco-Roman world.

Hathor

AthorTemple of HathorEye of Hathor
1550–1070 BCE), as she took on traits that originally belonged to Hathor, the preeminent goddess of earlier times, Isis came to be portrayed wearing Hathor's headdress: a sun disk between the horns of a cow.
1550–1070 BC), goddesses such as Mut and Isis encroached on Hathor's position in royal ideology, but she remained one of the most widely worshipped deities.

Veil of Isis

veiled Isismy veilpersonification of nature
Isis continues to appear in Western culture, particularly in esotericism and modern paganism, often as a personification of nature or the feminine aspect of divinity.
The veil of Isis is a metaphor and allegorical artistic motif in which nature is personified as the goddess Isis covered by a veil or mantle, representing the inaccessibility of nature's secrets.

Religion in ancient Rome

ancient Roman religionRoman religionRoman
As Hellenistic culture was absorbed by Rome in the first century BCE, the cult of Isis became a part of Roman religion.
By the height of the Empire, numerous international deities were cultivated at Rome and had been carried to even the most remote provinces, among them Cybele, Isis, Epona, and gods of solar monism such as Mithras and Sol Invictus, found as far north as Roman Britain.

Serapis

SarapisCult of Serapisgod Serapis
In the Hellenistic period (323–30 BCE), when Egypt was ruled and settled by Greeks, Isis came to be worshipped by Greeks and Egyptians, along with a new god, Serapis.
Serapis continued to increase in popularity during the Roman Empire, often replacing Osiris as the consort of Isis in temples outside Egypt.

Greeks

GreekHellenesGreek people
In the Hellenistic period (323–30 BCE), when Egypt was ruled and settled by Greeks, Isis came to be worshipped by Greeks and Egyptians, along with a new god, Serapis.
The cults of deities like Isis and Mithra were introduced into the Greek world.

Navigium Isidis

Isidis NavigiumFestival of Isisnavigum Isidis
Her following developed distinctive festivals such as the Navigium Isidis, as well as initiation ceremonies resembling those of other Greco-Roman mystery cults.
the vessel of Isis) was an annual ancient Roman religious festival in honor of the goddess Isis, held on March 5.

Harpocrates

Horus the ChildHoor-paar-kraatHarpocratians
Isis's Greek devotees ascribed to her traits taken from Greek deities, such as the invention of marriage and the protection of ships at sea, and she retained strong links with Egypt and other Egyptian deities who were popular in the Hellenistic world, such as Osiris and Harpocrates.
In Egyptian mythology, Horus was the child of Isis and Osiris.

Philae

Philae templePhilæTemple of Philae
Rulers in Egypt and its neighbor to the south, Nubia, began to build temples dedicated primarily to Isis, and her temple at Philae was a religious center for Egyptians and Nubians alike.
The most ancient was a temple for Isis, built in the reign of Nectanebo I during 380-362 BC, which was approached from the river through a double colonnade.

Egyptian mythology

EgyptianAncient Egyptian mythologyEgyptian god
The cycle of myth surrounding Osiris's death and resurrection was first recorded in the Pyramid Texts and grew into the most elaborate and influential of all Egyptian myths.
Amongst the most important episodes from the mythic past are the creation myths, in which the gods form the universe out of primordial chaos; the stories of the reign of the sun god Ra upon the earth; and the Osiris myth, concerning the struggles of the gods Osiris, Isis, and Horus against the disruptive god Set.

Behbeit El Hagar

Behbeit el-HagarHebit
Several passages in the Pyramid Texts link Isis with the region of the Nile Delta near Behbeit el-Hagar and Sebennytos, and her cult may have originated there.
It contains an ancient Egyptian temple for the goddess Isis.

Set (deity)

SetSethSutekh
She and her siblings—Osiris, Set, and Nephthys—are the last generation of the Ennead, born to Geb, god of the earth, and Nut, goddess of the sky.
Osiris's wife Isis reassembled his corpse and resurrected her dead husband long enough to conceive his son and heir Horus.

Nephthys

NepthysNebet-HetEgyptian goddess
She and her siblings—Osiris, Set, and Nephthys—are the last generation of the Ennead, born to Geb, god of the earth, and Nut, goddess of the sky.
Nephthys was typically paired with her sister Isis in funerary rites because of their role as protectors of the mummy and the god Osiris and as the sister-wife of Set.

Egyptian temple

templetemplesancient Egyptian temple
Originally, she played a limited role in royal rituals and temple rites, although she was more prominent in funerary practices and magical texts.
Others, including some that were dedicated to Egyptian gods—such as the temple to Isis at Ras el-Soda—were built in a style derived from Roman architecture.

Ennead

Ennead of HeliopolisEgyptiangod
Isis is part of the Ennead of Heliopolis, a family of nine deities descended from the creator god, Atum or Ra.
The Ennead or Great Ennead was a group of nine deities in Egyptian mythology worshiped at Heliopolis: the sun god Atum; his children Shu and Tefnut; their children Geb and Nut; and their children Osiris, Isis, Seth, and Nephthys.

List of fertility deities

fertility goddessfertility godfertility
In the same era, Horus was syncretized with the fertility god Min, so Isis was regarded as Min's mother.

True name

nametrue, secret nametruename
She offers to cure Ra if he will tell her his true, secret name—a piece of knowledge that carries with it incomparable power.
The true name of the Egyptian sun god Ra was revealed to Isis through an elaborate trick.

Nut (goddess)

NutNetNuit
She and her siblings—Osiris, Set, and Nephthys—are the last generation of the Ennead, born to Geb, god of the earth, and Nut, goddess of the sky.
She had four or, in some sources, five children: Osiris, Set, Isis, Nephthys, and in some sources Horus.

Greco-Roman mysteries

mystery religionsmystery religionmystery cult
Her following developed distinctive festivals such as the Navigium Isidis, as well as initiation ceremonies resembling those of other Greco-Roman mystery cults.
Some of the many divinities that the Romans nominally adopted from other cultures also came to be worshipped in Mysteries, for instance, Egyptian Isis, Persian Mithras from the Mithraic Mysteries, Thracian/Phrygian Sabazius, and Phrygian Cybele.

Orion (constellation)

OrionOrion constellationconstellation of Orion
Passages in the Pyramid Texts connect Isis closely with Sopdet, the goddess representing the star Sirius, whose relationship with her husband Sah—the constellation Orion—and their son Sopdu parallels Isis's relations with Osiris and Horus.
Sah is syncretized with Osiris, while Sopdet is syncretized with Osiris' mythological wife, Isis.

Four sons of Horus

Sons of Horus Four Sons of HorusAmenti gods
2055–1650 BCE) say the Four Sons of Horus, funerary deities who were thought to protect the internal organs of the deceased, were the offspring of Isis and the elder form of Horus.
Isis was often seen as the mother of the four sons of Horus though in the details of the funerary ritual each son, and therefore each canopic jar, was protected by a particular goddess.