A report on IslamMuslims and Jesus in Islam

The Kaaba at Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the holiest Islamic site
Prayer in Cairo (1865)
Jean-Léon Gérôme
Jesus' name in Islamic calligraphy followed by Peace be upon him
Muhammad receiving his first revelation from the angel Gabriel. From the manuscript Jami' al-Tawarikh by Rashid-al-Din Hamadani, 1307.
World Muslim population by percentage ( from Pew Research Center)
The Annunciation in miniature
The first chapter of the Quran, Al-Fatiha (The Opening), is seven verses
A map of Muslim populations by absolute number
According to the Quran, the pains of labor took Mary to the trunk of a palm tree.
A Persian miniature depicts Muhammad leading Abraham, Moses, Jesus and other prophets in prayer.
The Jordan River, where Jesus was baptized by Yahya ibn Zakariya (John the Baptist).
Silver coin of the Mughal Emperor Akbar, inscribed with the Shahadah
Timeline of Arrival of Jesus before Judgement Day
Muslim men prostrating in prayer, at the Umayyad Mosque, Damascus.
The Minaret of Isa in the Umayyad Mosque, Damascus
A fast-breaking feast, known as Iftar, is served traditionally with dates
Jesus and Mary in an old Persian miniature
Pilgrims at the Great Mosque of Mecca during the Hajj season
Muhammad leads Jesus, Abraham, Moses and others in prayer. Medieval Persian miniature.
Muslim men reading the Quran
Portrait of the Mughal Emperor Akbar supplicating to God.
Rashidun and Umayyad expansion
Dome of the Rock built by caliph Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan; completed at the end of the Second Fitna
The eye, according to Hunain ibn Ishaq from a manuscript dated c. 1200
Ghazan Khan, 7th Ilkhanate ruler of the Mongol Empire, converts to Islam
Abdülmecid II was the last Caliph of Islam from the Ottoman dynasty.
World Muslim population by percentage (Pew Research Center, 2014).
The nine volumes of Sahih Al-Bukhari, one of the six Sunni hadith books
The Imam Hussein Shrine in Iraq is a holy site for Shia Muslims
An overview of the major sects and madhahib of Islam
The Whirling Dervishes, or Mevlevi Order by the tomb of Sufi-mystic Rumi
Islamic schools of law in the Muslim world
Crimean Tatar Muslim students (1856)
Islamic veils represent modesty
John of Damascus, under the Umayyad Caliphate, viewed Islamic doctrines as a hodgepodge from the Bible.
Great Mosque of Djenné, in the west African country of Mali
Dome in Po-i-Kalyan, Bukhara, Uzbekistan
14th century Great Mosque of Xi'an in China
16th century Menara Kudus Mosque in Indonesia showing Indian influence
The phrase Bismillah in an 18th-century Islamic calligraphy from the Ottoman region.
Geometric arabesque tiling on the underside of the dome of Hafiz Shirazi's tomb in Shiraz, Iran
Ulu mosque in Utrecht, Netherlands

Islam (الإسلام, ) is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion, centred primarily around the Quran, a religious text that is considered by Muslims to be the direct word of God (or Allah) as it was revealed to Muhammad, the main and final Islamic prophet.

- Islam

Muslims (مسلم, ) are people who adhere to Islam, an Abrahamic religion.

- Muslims

In Islam, Jesus (عِيسَى ٱبْنُ مَرْيَمَ) is believed to be the penultimate prophet and messenger of God (Allah) and the Messiah.

- Jesus in Islam

Muslims believe that Islam is the complete and universal version of a primordial faith that was revealed many times through earlier prophets such as Adam, Abraham, Moses, and Jesus, among others; these earlier revelations are attributed to Judaism and Christianity, which are regarded in Islam as spiritual predecessor faiths.

- Islam

Like all prophets in Islam, Jesus is also called a Muslim, as he preached that his followers should adopt the 'straight path' (Ṣirāṭ al-Mustaqīm).

- Jesus in Islam

Some of those that were mentioned are: Adam, Noah, Abraham, Ishmael, Jacob, Moses, and Jesus and his apostles are all considered to be Muslims in the Qur'an.

- Muslims
The Kaaba at Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the holiest Islamic site

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'Muhammad' in Islamic calligraphy

Muhammad in Islam

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Believed to be the seal of the messengers and prophets of God in all the main branches of Islam.

Believed to be the seal of the messengers and prophets of God in all the main branches of Islam.

'Muhammad' in Islamic calligraphy
The name Muhammad written in Thuluth, a script variety of Islamic calligraphy
The birthplace of Muhammad. After his migration, the house was taken and sold by Aqil ibn Abi Talib. In modern times, the house was demolished and converted into a library in 1951.
Inside view of Quba Mosque
The place where the people of Medina welcomed Muhammad when he came from Mecca
A map of the Badr campaign
Artifact of Muhammad's letter to the Muqawqis, ruler of Egypt- actual document on the right with transcription on the left- Topkapi Palace Museum, Istanbul
Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
Al-Aqsa Mosque, in the Old City of Jerusalem, is said to be the location to which Muhammad traveled in his night journey. The location is the third holiest place for the Muslims.
A view of Taif with a road at the foreground and mountains at the background. Muhammad went there to preach Islam
Masjid an-Nabawi
Inside view of Masjid an-Nabawi
The Green Dome built over Muhammad's tomb
Part of Al-Masjid an-Nabawi where Muhammad's tomb is situated
Masjid an-Nabawi at sunset
Facsimile of a letter sent by Muhammad to the Munzir Bin Sawa Al-Tamimi, governor of Bahrain
Muhammad's letter To Heraclius
Masjid Al-Aqsa, in the Old City of Jerusalem, is said to be the location to which Muhammad traveled in his night journey. The location is the third holiest place for the Muslims.

Muslims believe that the Quran, the central religious text of Islam, was revealed to Muhammad by God, and that Muhammad was sent to restore Islam, which they believe did not originate with Muhammad but is the true unaltered original monotheistic faith of Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.

The next year, at the pilgrimage of June 622, a delegation of around 75 converted Muslims of Aws and Khazraj tribes from Yathrib came.

A rock carved with the text of "al-'Aqida al-Murshida" (the Guiding Creed) by Ibn Tumart (d. 524/1130) — the student of al-Ghazali (d. 505/ 1111) and the founder of the Almohad dynasty — praised and approved by Fakhr al-Din Ibn 'Asakir (d. 620/1223), located at al-Salah Islamic secondary school in Baalbek, Lebanon.

God in Islam

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Eternal being who originated the creation, preserves all things and then will resurrect all the humans.

Eternal being who originated the creation, preserves all things and then will resurrect all the humans.

A rock carved with the text of "al-'Aqida al-Murshida" (the Guiding Creed) by Ibn Tumart (d. 524/1130) — the student of al-Ghazali (d. 505/ 1111) and the founder of the Almohad dynasty — praised and approved by Fakhr al-Din Ibn 'Asakir (d. 620/1223), located at al-Salah Islamic secondary school in Baalbek, Lebanon.

In Islam, God is conceived as absolutely one, unique, and perfect, free from all faults, deficiencies, and defects, and further held to be omnipotent, omniscient, and completely infinite in all of his attributes, having no partner or equal, and being the sole creator of everything in existence.

Muslims reject the Christian doctrine of the Trinity and divinity of Jesus, comparing it to polytheism.

The Qur'an in particular is believed by Muslims to be the verbatim word of God as revealed to Muhammad.

The name ʾIbrāhīm written in Islamic calligraphy, followed by "Peace be upon him".

Abraham in Islam

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Prophet and messenger of God, and an ancestor to the Ishmaelite Arabs and Israelites.

Prophet and messenger of God, and an ancestor to the Ishmaelite Arabs and Israelites.

The name ʾIbrāhīm written in Islamic calligraphy, followed by "Peace be upon him".
Ibrahim's Sacrifice; Timurid Anthology, 1410–1411
The most significant mosque in Islam, that is the Mosque of the Kaaba in the Hejazi city of Mecca, is believed to date to the time of Abraham and Ishmael
The Maqam (Station) of Abraham which is believed by Muslims to contain his footprints, near the Kaaba in Al-Masjid Al-Haram
Al-Aqsa Mosque in the Temple Mount, Old City of Jerusalem in Shaam, is also believed to date to the lifetime of Abraham
Exterior view of the Cave of the Patriarchs in the Old City of Hebron, the Holy Land
Cenotaph over Abraham's grave in his mosque
In the section of the cave which is a mosque, this grate allows visitors to look down into a shaft measuring {{convert|40|ft|m|abbr=off}}, which leads to the ground level of the cave where Abraham and Sarah are buried
Masjid Al-Aqsa, also known as the Temple Mount, Old City of Jerusalem in Shaam, is also believed to date to the lifetime of Abraham

Abraham plays a prominent role as an example of faith in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

In Muslim belief, Abraham fulfilled all the commandments and trials wherein God nurtured him throughout his lifetime.

Muslims recognize Abraham as the ancestor through whom many other prophets and saints (Wali) came, including Moses, Jesus (Isa) and Muhammad.