A report on Islam

The Kaaba at Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the holiest Islamic site
Muhammad receiving his first revelation from the angel Gabriel. From the manuscript Jami' al-Tawarikh by Rashid-al-Din Hamadani, 1307.
The first chapter of the Quran, Al-Fatiha (The Opening), is seven verses
A Persian miniature depicts Muhammad leading Abraham, Moses, Jesus and other prophets in prayer.
Silver coin of the Mughal Emperor Akbar, inscribed with the Shahadah
Muslim men prostrating in prayer, at the Umayyad Mosque, Damascus.
A fast-breaking feast, known as Iftar, is served traditionally with dates
Pilgrims at the Great Mosque of Mecca during the Hajj season
Muslim men reading the Quran
Portrait of the Mughal Emperor Akbar supplicating to God.
Rashidun and Umayyad expansion
Dome of the Rock built by caliph Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan; completed at the end of the Second Fitna
The eye, according to Hunain ibn Ishaq from a manuscript dated c. 1200
Ghazan Khan, 7th Ilkhanate ruler of the Mongol Empire, converts to Islam
Abdülmecid II was the last Caliph of Islam from the Ottoman dynasty.
World Muslim population by percentage (Pew Research Center, 2014).
The nine volumes of Sahih Al-Bukhari, one of the six Sunni hadith books
The Imam Hussein Shrine in Iraq is a holy site for Shia Muslims
An overview of the major sects and madhahib of Islam
The Whirling Dervishes, or Mevlevi Order by the tomb of Sufi-mystic Rumi
Islamic schools of law in the Muslim world
Crimean Tatar Muslim students (1856)
Islamic veils represent modesty
John of Damascus, under the Umayyad Caliphate, viewed Islamic doctrines as a hodgepodge from the Bible.
Great Mosque of Djenné, in the west African country of Mali
Dome in Po-i-Kalyan, Bukhara, Uzbekistan
14th century Great Mosque of Xi'an in China
16th century Menara Kudus Mosque in Indonesia showing Indian influence
The phrase Bismillah in an 18th-century Islamic calligraphy from the Ottoman region.
Geometric arabesque tiling on the underside of the dome of Hafiz Shirazi's tomb in Shiraz, Iran
Ulu mosque in Utrecht, Netherlands

Abrahamic monotheistic religion, centred primarily around the Quran, a religious text that is considered by Muslims to be the direct word of God (or Allah) as it was revealed to Muhammad, the main and final Islamic prophet.

- Islam
The Kaaba at Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the holiest Islamic site

281 related topics with Alpha

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Sa'id Foudah, a contemporary Ash'ari scholar of kalam (Islamic systematic theology).

Kalam

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Study of Islamic doctrine ('aqa'id).

Study of Islamic doctrine ('aqa'id).

Sa'id Foudah, a contemporary Ash'ari scholar of kalam (Islamic systematic theology).

It was born out of the need to establish and defend the tenets of the Islamic faith against the philosophical doubters.

Hadith studies

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Hadith studies (علم الحديث ʻilm al-ḥadīth "science of hadith", also science of hadith, or science of hadith criticism or hadith criticism)

Hadith studies (علم الحديث ʻilm al-ḥadīth "science of hadith", also science of hadith, or science of hadith criticism or hadith criticism)

consists of several religious scholarly disciplines used by Muslim scholars in the study and evaluation of the Islamic hadith—i.e. the record of the words, actions, and the silent approval of the Islamic prophet, Muhammad.

Averroes insisted that all natural phenomena followed laws that God created.

Muʿtazila

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Islamic group that appeared in early Islāmic history and were known for their neutrality in the dispute between Alī and his opponents after the death of the third caliph, Uthman.

Islamic group that appeared in early Islāmic history and were known for their neutrality in the dispute between Alī and his opponents after the death of the third caliph, Uthman.

Averroes insisted that all natural phenomena followed laws that God created.

The later Mu'tazila school developed an Islamic type of rationalism, partly influenced by Ancient Greek philosophy, based around three fundamental principles: the oneness (Tawhid) and justice (Al-'adl) of God, human freedom of action, and the creation of the Quran.

Alhambra in Granada, Spain.

Islam in Europe

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Alhambra in Granada, Spain.
The Moors request permission from James I of Aragon, Spain, 13th century
Arab-Norman art and architecture in the Emirate of Sicily combined Occidental features (such as the Classical pillars and friezes) with typical Arabic decorations and calligraphy.
"Araz" coat of arms of Polish Tatar nobility. Tatar coats of arms often included motifs related to Islam.
Averroes was influential in the rise of secular thought in Western Europe.
Log pod Mangartom Mosque, the only mosque ever built in Slovenia, constructed in the town of Log pod Mangartom during World War I.
The Ottoman campaign for territorial expansion in Europe in 1566, Crimean Tatars as vanguard.
The King's Mosque in Pristina, Kosovo
The Ottoman Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent awaits the arrival of the Greek Muslim Grand Vizier Pargalı Ibrahim Pasha at Buda, in the year 1529.
Medieval Bulgaria particularly the city of Sofia, was the administrative centre of almost all Ottoman possessions in the Balkans also known as Rumelia.
Painting of the bazaar at Athens, Ottoman Greece, early 19th century
Registration of Christian boys for the tribute in blood. Ottoman miniature painting, 1558.
Muslim-majority areas in Europe
Mosque of Twenty-Five Prophets in Ufa, Bashkortostan, Russia
Gazi Husrev-beg Mosque in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
The Great Mosque of Paris, built after World War I.
According to the Pew Research Center, Europe's population was 6% Muslim in 2010, and is projected to be 8% Muslim by 2030. (The data does not take into account population movements from the Middle East and Africa since the migration crisis.)
Islam in the Balkans, density of mosques and major highways highlighting the major works of Yugoslavia's Brotherhood and Unity motorway.
Mosque of Rome, the largest in the European Union
The East London Mosque was one of the first in Britain to be allowed to use loudspeakers to broadcast the adhan.

Islam is the second-largest religion in Europe after Christianity.

Phap Hoa Temple, a Buddhist temple in Adelaide, Australia. Buddhism is the fastest-growing religion by percentage in Australia.

Growth of religion

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Growth of religion involves the spread of individual religions and the increase in the numbers of religious adherents around the world.

Growth of religion involves the spread of individual religions and the increase in the numbers of religious adherents around the world.

Phap Hoa Temple, a Buddhist temple in Adelaide, Australia. Buddhism is the fastest-growing religion by percentage in Australia.
Public worship ceremony at the Temple of Shennong-Yandi, in Suizhou, Hubei
A church, in China: The number of Chinese Christians has increased significantly; from 4 million before 1949 to 67 million in 2010.
Notre-Dame de Paris: Christianity is still the largest religion in Western Europe (71% in 2018).
A church in South Korea: Christianity has grown rapidly in South Korea from 1% in 1900 to 29.3% in 2010, due to the efforts of missionaries.
An event at Evangelical church: Protestantism is among the most dynamic religious movements in the contemporary world.
A church in Indonesia: Since the mid and late 1960s, between two million to 2.5 million Muslims converted to Christianity in Indonesia.
Map of the world by population of Christians (Pew 2010).
Druze families in Golan Heights: The Druze in Israel and Lebanon have a low fertility-rate.
Dakshineswar Bhabatarini Kali temple of Kolkata established by Rani Rashmoni.
The mosque of Dumai, in Riau. Indonesia has the largest number of Muslims in the world.
Map of the world by population of Muslims. Although the faith began in Arabia, its three largest communities are found in Indonesia, Pakistan and India (home to 35% of world's Muslim population).
Jama Masjid, Delhi: By 2050, India is projected to have the world's largest Muslim population.
Islamic presence grew rapidly under the Caliphate in the first hundred years of its conquests.
Jews Praying at the Western Wall, Israel: The Haredi and some Orthodox sectors, are becoming a growing proportion of Jews.
Map of the distribution of Jews in the world
The Baháʼí House of Worship of Wilmette, Illinois
Nonreligious population by country, 2010
The Golden Temple, an important sacred place in Sikhism
Maneckji Seth Agiary (Parsi place of worship) in Mumbai: India has the largest number of Zoroastrians in the world.

Studies in the 21st century suggest that, in terms of percentage and worldwide spread, Islam is the fastest-growing major religion in the world.

Muhammad visits at the inmates of hell, tormented by Zabaniyya led by the guardians of hell also showing the tree Zaqqum with the heads of Shayateen. Miniature from "The David Collection Copenhagen"

Jahannam

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Muhammad visits at the inmates of hell, tormented by Zabaniyya led by the guardians of hell also showing the tree Zaqqum with the heads of Shayateen. Miniature from "The David Collection Copenhagen"
Diagram of "Plain of Assembly" (Ard al-Hashr) on the Day of Judgment, from an autograph manuscript of Futuhat al-Makkiyya by Sufi mystic and Muslim philosopher Ibn Arabi, ca. 1238. Shown are the 'Arsh (Throne of God), pulpits for the righteous (al-Aminun), seven rows of angels, Gabriel (al-Ruh), A'raf (the Barrier), the Pond of Abundance, al-Maqam al-Mahmud (the Praiseworthy Station; where the prophet Muhammad will stand to intercede for the faithful), Mizan (the Scale), As-Sirāt (the Bridge), Jahannam (Hell), and Marj al-Jannat (Meadow of Paradise).
Satan is trapped in the frozen central zone in the Ninth Circle of Hell, Inferno, Canto 34.

In Islam, the place of punishment for unbelievers and other evildoers in the afterlife, or hell,

Diagram of "Plain of Assembly" (Ard al-Hashr) on the Day of Judgment, from an autograph manuscript of Futuhat al-Makkiyya by Sufi mystic and Muslim philosopher Ibn Arabi, ca. 1238. Shown are the 'Arsh (Throne of God), pulpits for the righteous (al-Aminun), seven rows of angels, Gabriel (al-Ruh), A'raf (the Barrier), the Pond of Abundance, al-Maqam al-Mahmud (the Praiseworthy Station; where the prophet Muhammad will stand to intercede for the faithful), Mizan (the Scale), As-Sirāt (the Bridge), Jahannam (Hell), and Marj al-Jannat (Meadow of Paradise).

Jannah

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Diagram of "Plain of Assembly" (Ard al-Hashr) on the Day of Judgment, from an autograph manuscript of Futuhat al-Makkiyya by Sufi mystic and Muslim philosopher Ibn Arabi, ca. 1238. Shown are the 'Arsh (Throne of God), pulpits for the righteous (al-Aminun), seven rows of angels, Gabriel (al-Ruh), A'raf (the Barrier), the Pond of Abundance, al-Maqam al-Mahmud (the Praiseworthy Station; where the prophet Muhammad will stand to intercede for the faithful), Mizan (the Scale), As-Sirāt (the Bridge), Jahannam (Hell), and Marj al-Jannat (Meadow of Paradise).
A Persian miniature depicting paradise from The History of Mohammed, Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
Pomegranate flower and fruit, considered a fruit from paradise in Muslim tradition. Therefore, it is used as an ingredient in a dessert (Ashure) used to commemorate prophetic events.
Adam and Eve, cast out from the Garden, along them the serpent and the peacock, who gave aid to Satan. Painting from a copy of the Fālnāmeh (Book of Omens) ascribed to Ja´far al-Sādiq.

In Islam, Jannah (جَنّة, pl. جَنّٰت jannāt, Cennet), lit. "paradise, garden", is the final abode of the righteous.

The Meeting of the Theologians, Persian painting by Abd Allah Musawwir (mid-16th century), Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Schools of Islamic theology

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Schools of Islamic theology are various Islamic schools and branches in different schools of thought regarding ʿaqīdah (creed).

Schools of Islamic theology are various Islamic schools and branches in different schools of thought regarding ʿaqīdah (creed).

The Meeting of the Theologians, Persian painting by Abd Allah Musawwir (mid-16th century), Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.
Sunnī schools of thought
The founder of the Bektashiyyah sufi order Hacı Bektaş-ı Veli (Ḥājjī Baktāsh Walī), a murid of Malāmatī-Qalāndārī Sheikh Qutb ad-Dīn Haydar, who introduced the Ahmad Yasavi's doctrine of "Four Doors and Forty Stending" into his tariqah.
Four Spiritual Stations in Bektashiyyah: Sharia, tariqa, haqiqa, and the fourth station, marifa, which is considered "unseen", is actually the center of the haqiqa region. Marifa is the essence of all four stations.
Imam Ali Shrine in Najaf, Iraq, where Shias believe Ali is buried.
Shah Ismail I, the Sheikh of the Safavi tariqa, founder of the Safavid Dynasty of Iran, and the Commander-in-chief of the Kızılbaş armies had contributed a lot for the development and implementation of The Qizilbash ʿAqīdah amongst the Turkmen people.

Some of the Alevis criticizes the course of Islam as it is being practiced overwhelmingly by more than 99% of Sunni and Shia population.

A Jordan Islamic Bank branch in Amman

Islamic banking and finance

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Banking or financing activity that complies with Sharia (Islamic law) and its practical application through the development of Islamic economics.

Banking or financing activity that complies with Sharia (Islamic law) and its practical application through the development of Islamic economics.

A Jordan Islamic Bank branch in Amman
Building housing the Islamic Banking & Finance Institute Malaysia (IBFIM) in downtown Kuala Lumpur
A Saba Islamic Bank branch in Djibouti City
An Islamic Development Bank branch in Dhaka
An Islamic bank branch in the UMNO building in Kota Kinabalu
The Faisal Islamic Bank in Khartoum.
Bank Islam Brunei Darussalam in Brunei.

By 2004, the strength of this belief (which is the basis of Islamic finance) was demonstrated in the world's second largest Muslim country—Pakistan—when a minority (non-Muslim) member of the Pakistani parliament questioned it, pointing out that a scholar from Al-Azhar University, (one of the oldest Islamic Universities in the world), had issued a decree that bank interest was not un-Islamic.

Ascent of Muhammad to Heaven (c. 1539–1543), from the Khamseh of Nizami.

Isra' and Mi'raj

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Ascent of Muhammad to Heaven (c. 1539–1543), from the Khamseh of Nizami.
Al-Aqsa Mosque compound, also known as the Temple Mount
Isra and Mihraj calligraphy for all descriptive purposes

The Israʾ and Miʿraj (الإسراء والمعراج, al-’Isrā’ wal-Miʿrāj) are the two parts of a Night Journey that, according to Islam, the Islamic prophet Muhammad (570–632) took during a single night around the year 621.