A report on Israel and State of Palestine

The Merneptah Stele (13th century BCE). The majority of biblical archeologists translate a set of hieroglyphs as "Israel," the first instance of the name in the record.
Demonstration against road block, Kafr Qaddum, March 2012
The Large Stone Structure, an archaeological site in Jerusalem
The destroyed Palestinian Legislative Council building in Gaza City, Gaza–Israel conflict, September 2009
Map of Israeli settlements in the West Bank
Map of Israel and Judah in the 9th century BCE
International recognition of the State of Palestine
Portion of the Temple Scroll, one of the Dead Sea Scrolls, written during the Second Temple period
Children waving a Palestinian flag, West Bank
Kfar Bar'am, an ancient Jewish village, abandoned some time between the 7th–13th centuries CE.
Palestinian girls in Nablus
The 13th-century Ramban Synagogue in Jerusalem
Illustration of Palestinian Christian home in Jerusalem, ca 1850. By W. H. Bartlett
Jews at the Western Wall in the 1870s
The First Zionist Congress (1897) in Basel, Switzerland
UN Map, "Palestine plan of partition with economic union"
Territory held by Israel: The Sinai Peninsula was returned to Egypt in 1982.
Israel's 1980 law declared that "Jerusalem, complete and united, is the capital of Israel."
Shimon Peres (left) with Yitzhak Rabin (center) and King Hussein of Jordan (right), prior to signing the Israel–Jordan peace treaty in 1994.
The site of the 2001 Tel Aviv Dolphinarium discotheque massacre, in which 21 Israelis were killed.
Köppen climate classification map of Israel and the Golan Heights
Population pyramid of Israel
Immigration to Israel in the years 1948–2015. The two peaks were in 1949 and 1990.
Road sign in Hebrew, Arabic, and English
The Dome of the Rock and the Western Wall, Jerusalem.
Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center at Bar-Ilan University
Mount Scopus Campus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
The Knesset chamber, home to the Israeli parliament
Political system of state of Israel
Supreme Court of Israel, Givat Ram, Jerusalem
Map of Israel showing the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, and the Golan Heights
Israeli West Bank barrier separating Israel and the West Bank
Area C of the West Bank, controlled by Israel under Oslo Accords, in blue and red, in December 2011
Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat at the signing ceremony of the Oslo Accords with then US President Bill Clinton
Squad commanders exercise at Eliakim training base in 2012
Iron Dome is the world's first operational anti-artillery rocket defense system.
Change in per capita GDP of Israel since 1950. Figures are inflation-adjusted to 2011 International dollars.
The Diamond Exchange District in Ramat Gan
Tel Aviv Stock Exchange. Its building is optimized for computer trading, with systems located in an underground bunker to keep the exchange active during emergencies.
Matam high-tech park in Haifa
The world's largest solar parabolic dish at the Ben-Gurion National Solar Energy Center.
Ben Gurion International Airport
Ein Bokek resort on the shore of the Dead Sea
Shmuel Yosef Agnon, laureate of the Nobel Prize in Literature
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Zubin Mehta
Shrine of the Book, repository of the Dead Sea Scrolls in Jerusalem
A meal including falafel, hummus, French fries and Israeli salad
Teddy Stadium of Jerusalem
Boris Gelfand, chess Grandmaster

Israel later captured the Gaza Strip and the Sinai Peninsula from Egypt, the West Bank and East Jerusalem from Jordan, and the Golan Heights from Syria during the Six-Day War in June 1967.

- State of Palestine

During the summit, Barak offered a plan for the establishment of a Palestinian state.

- Israel

24 related topics with Alpha

Overall

City of Bethlehem, West Bank

West Bank

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Landlocked territory near the coast of the Mediterranean in Western Asia.

Landlocked territory near the coast of the Mediterranean in Western Asia.

City of Bethlehem, West Bank
The Cave of the Patriarchs is one of the most famous holy sites in the region.
King Hussein flying over the Temple Mount in Jerusalem when it was under Jordanian control, 1965
City of Jericho, West Bank
U.S. President George Bush and Mahmoud Abbas in Ramallah, 2008
View of the Judaean Mountains from Ramallah
Map of West Bank settlements and closures in January 2006: Yellow = Palestinian urban centers. Light pink = closed military areas or settlement boundary areas or areas isolated by the Israeli West Bank barrier; dark pink = settlements, outposts or military bases. The black line = route of the Barrier
Greater Jerusalem, May 2006. CIA remote sensing map showing areas considered settlements, plus refugee camps, fences, walls, etc.
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West Bank barrier (Separating Wall)
Qalandiya Checkpoint between Ramallah and Jerusalem
Northern Governorates
Palestinian girl in Nablus
Jewish children in Tal Menashe.
Settlement of Ariel
Residential neighborhood of Ramallah
Road in the West Bank
Checkpoint before entering Jericho, 2005

It is bordered by Jordan and the Dead Sea to the east and by Israel (see Green Line) to the south, west, and north.

Alongside the self-governing Gaza Strip, the Israeli-occupied West Bank and East Jerusalem are claimed by the State of Palestine as its sovereign territory, and thus remain a flashpoint of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict.

2018 United Nations OCHA map of the area, showing Israeli occupation arrangements

East Jerusalem

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2018 United Nations OCHA map of the area, showing Israeli occupation arrangements
East Jerusalem zoning
Map of East Jerusalem. The Arab areas are coloured green, while the Jewish areas are blue.
William McLean's 1918 plan was the first urban planning scheme for Jerusalem. It laid the foundations for what became West Jerusalem and East Jerusalem.
Old Roman era gate beneath the Damascus Gate (Bab al-'Amud) in Jerusalem
1961 Jordan Tourism Map of Jerusalem
King Hussein flying over the Temple Mount while it was under Jordanian control, 1965
Aerial view of the ancient Jewish cemetery on Mount of Olives
2018 United Nations map of the area, showing the Israeli occupation arrangements.
Israeli West Bank barrier in Jerusalem
Jerusalem municipal area, under Israel in 2000
Greater Jerusalem, May 2006. CIA remote sensing map showing areas they consider settlements, plus refugee camps, fences, walls, etc.
East Jerusalem, with Israeli West Bank barrier in the background
Dome of the Rock in the Old City
UN map showing a series of Israeli "Inner Settlements" – each represented as red crosses – with clusters in the Old City, to the south adjacent to the City of David (shown as "Beit Hazofe" (בית הצופה, "Observation House")) and Ma'ale HaZeitim, and to the north around Shimon HaTzadik.
The new building is Schmidt's Girls College.

East Jerusalem (القدس الشرقية, al-Quds ash-Sharqiya; מִזְרַח יְרוּשָׁלַיִם, Mizraḥ Yerushalayim) is the sector of Jerusalem that was held by Jordan during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, as opposed to the western sector of the city, West Jerusalem, which was held by Israel.

Palestinians and many in the international community consider East Jerusalem to be the future capital of the State of Palestine.

Orient House, the former PLO headquarters in Jerusalem

Palestine Liberation Organization

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Orient House, the former PLO headquarters in Jerusalem

The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO; منظمة التحرير الفلسطينية, Munaẓẓamat at-Taḥrīr al-Filasṭīniyyah) is a Palestinian nationalist political and militant organization founded in 1964 with the initial purpose of establishing Arab unity and statehood over the territory of former Mandatory Palestine, in opposition to the State of Israel.

As the official recognized government of the de jure State of Palestine, it has enjoyed observer status at the United Nations (UN) since 1974.

Gaza Strip

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Palestinian enclave on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea.

Palestinian enclave on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea.

Gaza City skyline, 2007.
Downtown Gaza, 2012.
Beit Hanoun region of Gaza in August 2014, after Israeli bombardments.
British artillery battery in front of Gaza, 1917
Gaza War Cemetery
Che Guevara visiting Gaza in 1959
View of Gaza during the 2000s.
Barrier fence
The Al Deira Hotel on the Gaza coast, 2009
Buildings damaged during Operation "Cast Lead".
Monthly rocket and mortar hits in Israel, 2008.
Israelis killed by Palestinians in Israel ( blue ) and Palestinians killed by Israelis in Gaza ( red )
Sea-view from the Al Deira Hotel on the Gaza coast
A resort in the Gaza Strip built on the location of the former Israeli settlement of Netzarim
Backyard industry
Muslim worshippers in Gaza
Damaged UN school and remmants of the Ministry of Interior in Gaza City, December 2012
Watchtower on the border between Rafah and Egypt.
Tent camp, April 2009, after Cast Lead.
University College of Applied Sciences, the largest college in Gaza
Islamic University of Gaza
Gaza amusement park.
Damaged part of Gaza airport, May 2002

It borders Egypt on the southwest for 11 km and Israel on the east and north along a 51 km border.

The Gaza Strip and the West Bank are claimed by the de jure sovereign State of Palestine.

Jerusalem

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City in Western Asia.

City in Western Asia.

Close up of the Khirbet Beit Lei inscription, showing the earliest extra-biblical Hebrew writing of the word Jerusalem, dated to the seventh or sixth century BCE
Stepped Stone Structure in the City of David, the ancient core of Jerusalem during the Bronze Age and Iron Age
The Siloam Inscription, written in Biblical Hebrew, commemorates the construction of the Siloam tunnel (c. 700 BCE)
Modern-day reconstruction of Jerusalem during the reign of Solomon (10th century BCE). Solomon's Temple appears on top.
Holyland Model of Jerusalem, depicting the city during the late Second Temple period. First created in 1966, it is continuously updated according to advancing archaeological knowledge
A coin issued by the Jewish rebels in 68 CE. Obverse: "Shekel, Israel. Year 3". Reverse: "Jerusalem the Holy", in the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet
Stones from the Western Wall of the Temple Mount thrown during the Roman Siege of Jerusalem in 70 CE
The Siege and Destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans (David Roberts, 1850)
Jerusalem mural depicting the Cardo during the Byzantine period.
1455 painting of the Holy Land. Jerusalem is viewed from the west; the octagonal Dome of the Rock stands left of Al-Aqsa, shown as a church, and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre stands on the left side of the picture.
Medieval illustration of capture of Jerusalem during the First Crusade, 1099.
Jerusalem, from 'Peregrinatio in Terram Sanctam' by Bernhard von Breydenbach (1486)
Topographic map of the city, c. 1600.
1844 daguerreotype by Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey (the earliest photograph of the city).
William McLean's 1918 plan was the first urban planning scheme for Jerusalem. It laid the foundations for what became West Jerusalem and East Jerusalem.
Jerusalem on VE Day, 8 May 1945.
Map of East Jerusalem (2010)
The Knesset houses the legislature of Israel
Supreme Court of Israel
Israeli Foreign Ministry building
Orient House in East Jerusalem that served as the headquarters of the PLO in the 1980s and 1990s. It was closed by Israel in 2001, two days after the Sbarro restaurant suicide bombing.
Snow visible on roofs in the Old City of Jerusalem.
Rehavia and Kiryat Wolfson, two Jewish neighborhoods, as seen from Givat Ram
Sheikh Jarrah, a predominantly Arab neighborhood on the road to Mount Scopus.
Sign in Armenian in the Armenian Quarter.
The Old City is home to many sites of seminal religious importance for the three major Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Bank of Israel
Har Hotzvim high-tech park
Mamilla Mall adorned with upscale shops stands just outside the Old City Walls.
Holyland Tower, Jerusalem's tallest building
Jerusalem Chords Bridge
Light Rail tram on Jaffa Road
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus campus
Hand in Hand, a bilingual Jewish-Arab school in Jerusalem
Hebron Yeshiva in Givat Mordechai neighborhood
The Shrine of the Book, housing the Dead Sea Scrolls, at the Israel Museum
Jerusalem Biblical Zoo
National Library of Israel
Teddy Stadium, Malha
Pais Arena
Tower of David citadel and the Ottoman walls
Ben-Zakai synagogue, photo taken in 1893
Guesthouse in Mishkenot Sha'ananim, the first Jewish neighborhood built outside the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem (1860), on a hill directly across from Mount Zion.
Israeli policemen meet a Jordanian Legionnaire near the Mandelbaum Gate ({{Circa|1950}}).
King Hussein of Jordan flying over the Temple Mount in East Jerusalem when it was under Jordanian control, 1965.
Astronauts' view of Jerusalem.
Sunset aerial photograph of the Mount of Olives.
The Temple Mount, the site of the two former Jewish Temples, is the holiest spot in Judaism
The Western Wall, also known as the Wailing Wall and the Kotel, is a remnant of the Second Temple and the holiest place where Jews are permitted to pray
The Church of the Holy Sepulchre contains the two holiest sites in Christianity: the site where Jesus was crucified, and Jesus's empty tomb, where he is believed by Christians to have been buried and resurrected.
Al-Aqsa Mosque, the third holiest site in Sunni Islam. Muslims believe that Muhammad was transported from the Great Mosque of Mecca to this location during the Night Journey.
The Garden Tomb – a new holy site established by British Protestants in the 19th century
Demographic history of Jerusalem by religion based on available data
Teddy Stadium, Malha

The city straddles the Green Line between Israel and the West Bank; both Israelis and Palestinians claim Jerusalem as their capital.

Israel controls the entire city and maintains its primary governmental institutions there while the Palestinian National Authority and Palestine Liberation Organization ultimately foresee it as the seat of power for the State of Palestine.

A depiction of Syria and Palestine from CE 650 to 1500

Palestinians

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Ethnonational group descending from peoples who have inhabited the region of Palestine over the millennia, and who are today culturally and linguistically Arab.

Ethnonational group descending from peoples who have inhabited the region of Palestine over the millennia, and who are today culturally and linguistically Arab.

A depiction of Syria and Palestine from CE 650 to 1500
Palestinian mother and child
A loom at work making a traditional Palestinian keffiyeh in Hebron, Palestine. The keffiyeh is a traditional headdress with origins in Arabia
A veiled Arab woman in Bersheeba, Palestine c.1940
Tawfiq Canaan (1882–1964) was a pioneering Palestinian ethnographer and Palestinian nationalist. Deeply interested in Palestinian folklore (principally Canaanite, Philistine, Hebraic, Nabatean, Syrio-Aramaic and Arab), Canaan wrote several books and more than 50 articles on the matter
Depiction of Palestine in the time of Saul c. 1020 BC according to George Adam Smith's 1915 Atlas of the Historical Geography of the Holy Land
Palestinian children in Hebron
Edward Said and Daniel Barenboim in Sevilla, 2002
Saladin's Falcon, the coat of arms and emblem of the Palestinian Authority
Khalil Beidas's 1898 use of the word "Palestinians" in the preface to his translation of Akim Olesnitsky's [[:File:Olesnitsky A. The Holy Land. Vol. 1 (Russian).djvu|A Description of the Holy Land]]
A 1930 protest in Jerusalem against the British Mandate by Palestinian women. The sign reads "No dialogue, no negotiations until termination [of the Mandate]"
UN stamp to commemorate the Palestinian struggle
Musa Alami (1897-1984) was a Palestinian nationalist and politician and was viewed in the 1940s as the leader of the Palestinians
Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, leader of the Army of the Holy War in 1948
Yasser Arafat, Nayef Hawatmeh and Kamal Nasser in a Jordan press conference in Amman, 1970
Protest for Palestine in Tunisia
Palestinian refugees in 1948
Palestinian girls in Nablus
Christians from Gaza
Palestinian Druze family making bread 1920
Areen Omari, a Palestinian actress and producer, attends a motion picture ceremony
Palestinian market at Jaffa, 1877 painting
The Umm al-Fahm Art Gallery
Palestinian novelist and non-fiction writer Susan Abulhawa
Mahmoud Darwish, Palestinian poet
Palestinian-American writer Naomi Shihab Nye
Samah Sabawi is a Palestinian dramatist, writer and journalist.
Kamanjeh performer in Jerusalem, 1859
American radio personality and record producer DJ Khaled, of Palestinian descent
Palestinians attending prayers at the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem
The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, the holiest site in Christianity
Palestinian Christian Scouts on Christmas Eve in front of the Nativity Church in Bethlehem, 2006
Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron
Jews in 'Ben Zakai' house of prayer, Jerusalem, 1893.
Tomb of Jethro in Hittin, Northern Israel.
Muslims pray in Jerusalem, 1840. By David Roberts, in The Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia, Egypt, and Nubia
A Palestinian Christian family in Ramallah, Ottoman Palestine, 1905
Married Eastern Orthodox priest from Jerusalem with his family (three generations), circa 1893
Palestinian students and John Kerry
Palestinian students
Palestinian students
Musakhan: The Palestinian National dish.
A plate of hummus, garnished with paprika and olive oil and pine nuts
A Palestinian youth serving Falafel in Ramallah.
Kanafeh: a Palestinian dessert.
The Alhamra Cinema, Jaffa, 1937, bombed December 1947
Villagers in Halhul at an open-air cinema screening c. 1940
A woman from Bethlehem, c. 1940s.
Young woman of Ramallah wearing dowry headdress, c. 1898–1914
Ramallah woman, c. 1920, Library of Congress
A Traditional Women's Dress in Ramallah, c. 1920.
Girls in Bethlehem costume pre-1885.
Palestinian Dabke folk dance being performed by men
Palestinian women dancing traditionally, Bethlehem c. 1936
Marco Zaror is a Chilean martial artist of Palestinian descent.
Nicolás Massú is a Chilean tennis player of Palestinian descent.
Roberto Bishara Adawi is a footballer of Palestinian descent.

Despite various wars and exoduses, roughly one half of the world's Palestinian population continues to reside in the territory of former British Palestine, now encompassing the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (the Palestinian territories) as well as Israel.

Followed by the PLO's 1988 proclamation of a State of Palestine, these developments served to further reinforce the Palestinian national identity.

Jordan

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Country in Western Asia.

Country in Western Asia.

The 'Ain Ghazal Statues (c. 7250 BC) of Amman are some of the oldest human statues ever found.
The Mesha Stele (c. 840 BC) records the glory of Mesha, King of Moab
Al-Khazneh in Petra (c. 1st century AD), is believed to be the mausoleum of the Arab Nabataean King Aretas IV.
The Oval Forum of Jerash (c. 1st century AD), then member of the ten-city Roman league, the Decapolis. Seven out of the ten Decapolis cities are present in modern-day Jordan.
The earliest detailed map of the land which became Jordan, showing the travels of Johann Ludwig Burckhardt (the first European to see Petra since the Crusades) in 1822
Soldiers of the Hashemite-led Arab Army holding the flag of the Great Arab Revolt in 1916
Al-Salt residents gather on 20 August 1920 during the British High Commissioner's visit to Transjordan.
King Abdullah I on 25 May 1946 reading the declaration of independence.
King Hussein on 21 March 1968 checking an abandoned Israeli tank in the aftermath of the Battle of Karameh.
Army Chief Habis Majali and Prime Minister Wasfi Tal during a military parade in 1970, two widely acclaimed national figures.
Wadi Rum's resemblance to the surface of Mars has made it a popular filming and tourist attraction.
The Dead Sea is the lowest point on earth.
A forest in Ajloun, northern Jordan.
The House of Representatives during a parliamentary session
U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump with King Abdullah II and Queen Rania of Jordan at the White House, 2017.
An Amman City Centre Police patrol vehicle.
Change in per capita GDP of Jordan, 1950–2018. Figures are inflation-adjusted to 2011 International Geary-Khamis dollars.
View of a part of the capital Amman
Queen Alia International Airport near Amman was chosen as the best airport in the Middle East for 2014 and 2015 by ASQ.
Al-Maghtas ruins on the Jordanian side of the Jordan River, believed by many to have been the location of the Baptism of Jesus and the ministry of John the Baptist
The Dana Biosphere Reserve in southern Jordan lies along the Jordan Trail, a hiking path that is gaining popularity
A phosphate train at Ram station
The Aqaba Flagpole in the southernmost city of Aqaba, Jordan's only coastal outlet
The 117 MW Tafila Wind Farm in southern Jordan is the first and largest onshore wind farm in the Middle East.
An aerial view of a portion of the Zaatari refugee camp which contains a population of 80,000 Syrian refugees, the largest Syrian refugee camp in the world.
Jordanian school girls pictured reading in a public school. Jordan's total youth female literacy rate (15 – 24 years) was 99.37% in 2015.
Jordanian folklore band playing bagpipes in Jerash.
Mansaf, the traditional dish of Jordan. Inspired from Bedouin culture, it is a symbol of Jordanian hospitality.

Jordan is bordered by Saudi Arabia to the south and east, Iraq to the northeast, Syria to the north, and the Palestinian West Bank, Israel, and the Dead Sea to the west.

Bill Clinton, Yitzhak Rabin, Yasser Arafat at the White House in 1993

Oslo Accords

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Bill Clinton, Yitzhak Rabin, Yasser Arafat at the White House in 1993
Area C, controlled by Israel under Oslo Accords, in blue and red, in December 2011

The Oslo Accords are a pair of agreements between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO): the Oslo I Accord, signed in Washington, D.C., in 1993; and the Oslo II Accord, signed in Taba, Egypt, in 1995.

Bilateral dialogue stems from questions related to the international border between Israel and a future Palestinian state: negotiations for this subject are centred around Israeli settlements, the status of Jerusalem, Israel's maintenance of control over security following the establishment of Palestinian autonomy, and the Palestinian right of return.

Egypt

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Transcontinental country spanning the northeast corner of Africa and southwest corner of Asia via a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula.

Transcontinental country spanning the northeast corner of Africa and southwest corner of Asia via a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula.

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Temple of Derr ruins in 1960
The Giza Necropolis is the oldest of the ancient Wonders and the only one still in existence.
Egyptian soldier of the Achaemenid army, c. 480 BCE. Xerxes I tomb relief.
The Ptolemaic Queen Cleopatra VII and her son by Julius Caesar, Caesarion, at the Temple of Dendera
The Amr ibn al-As mosque in Cairo, recognized as the oldest in Africa
The Ibn Tulun Mosque in Cairo, of Ahmad Ibn Tulun
The Al-Hakim Mosque in Cairo, of Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, the sixth caliph, as renovated by Dawoodi Bohra
Napoleon defeated the Mamluk troops in the Battle of the Pyramids, 21 July 1798, painted by Lejeune.
Egypt under Muhammad Ali dynasty
Muhammad Ali was the founder of the Muhammad Ali dynasty and the first Khedive of Egypt and Sudan.
The battle of Tel el-Kebir in 1882 during the Anglo-Egyptian War
Female nationalists demonstrating in Cairo, 1919
Fuad I of Egypt with Edward, Prince of Wales, 1932
British infantry near El Alamein, 17 July 1942
Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser in Mansoura, 1960
Smoke rises from oil tanks beside the Suez Canal hit during the initial Anglo-French assault on Egypt, 5 November 1956.
Egyptian tanks advancing in the Sinai desert during the Yom Kippur War, 1973
Celebrating the signing of the 1978 Camp David Accords: Menachem Begin, Jimmy Carter, Anwar Sadat
Cairo grew into a metropolitan area with a population of over 20 million.
Women in Cairo wear face masks during the COVID-19 pandemic in Egypt in March 2020.
Egypt's topography
The Qattara Depression in Egypt's north west
The Eastern Imperial Eagle is the national animal of Egypt.
Abdel Fattah el-Sisi is the current President of Egypt.
Egyptian honor guard soldiers during a visit of U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen
President el-Sisi with US President Donald Trump, 21 May 2017
The High Court of Justice in Downtown Cairo
Protesters from the Third Square movement, which supported neither the former Morsi government nor the Armed Forces, 31 July 2013
Prominent Egyptian dissident Alaa Abd El-Fattah was sentenced to five years of imprisonment in December 2021.
1. Matrouh
2. Alexandria
3. Beheira
4. Kafr El Sheikh
5. Dakahlia
6. Damietta
7. Port Said
8. North Sinai
9. Gharbia
10. Monufia
11. Qalyubia
12. Sharqia
13. Ismailia
14. Giza
15. Faiyum
16. Cairo
17. Suez
18. South Sinai
19. Beni Suef
20. Minya
21. New Valley
22. Asyut
23. Red Sea
24. Sohag
25. Qena
26. Luxor
27. Aswan
Change in per capita GDP of Egypt, 1820–2018. Figures are inflation-adjusted to 2011 International dollars.
Smart Village, a business district established in 2001 to facilitate the growth of high-tech businesses
The Suez Canal
Tourists riding an Arabian camel in front of Pyramid of Khafre. The Giza Necropolis is one of Egypt's main tourist attractions.
An offshore platform in the Darfeel Gas Field
The Cairo Metro (line 2)
The Suez Canal Bridge
Green irrigated land along the Nile amidst the desert and in the delta
Egypt's population density (people per km2)
St. Mark Coptic Cathedral in Alexandria
Cairo University
Egyptian literacy rate among the population aged 15 years and older by UNESCO Institute of Statistics
Children's Cancer Hospital Egypt
Al-Azhar Park is listed as one of the world's sixty great public spaces by the Project for Public Spaces.
The "weighing of the heart" scene from the Book of the Dead
Naguib Mahfouz, the first Arabic-language writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature
Salah Zulfikar, film star
Soad Hosny, film star
Tanoura dancers performing in Wekalet El Ghoury, Cairo
The Egyptian Museum of Cairo
Tutankhamun's burial mask is one of the major attractions of the Egyptian Museum of Cairo.
Kushari, one of Egypt's national dishes
A crowd at Cairo Stadium watching the Egypt national football team

It is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, the Gaza Strip (Palestine) and Israel to the northeast, the Red Sea to the east, Sudan to the south, and Libya to the west.

Palestinian territories

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Gaza City in 2007.
Israeli soldiers in Awarta, West Bank in 2011
The destroyed Palestinian Legislative Council building in Gaza City, Gaza–Israel conflict, September 2009
Settler population, 1972–2007: yellow=East Jerusalem; blue= rest of West Bank
Governorates of the Palestinian National Authority
Israeli signpost warning Israeli citizens that entry into Area 'A' is forbidden, life-endangering, and constitutes a criminal offense

The term "Palestinian territories" has been used to describe the territories of the former British Mandate for Palestine that have been militarly occupied by Israel since the Six-Day War of 1967, namely: the West Bank (including East Jerusalem) and the Gaza Strip.

The term occupied Palestinian territory was used by the United Nations and other international organizations between October 1999 and December 2012 to refer to areas controlled by the Palestinian National Authority, but from 2012, when Palestine was admitted as one of its non-member observer states, the United Nations started using exclusively the name State of Palestine.