A report on Israel

The Merneptah Stele (13th century BCE). The majority of biblical archeologists translate a set of hieroglyphs as "Israel," the first instance of the name in the record.
The Large Stone Structure, an archaeological site in Jerusalem
Map of Israel and Judah in the 9th century BCE
Portion of the Temple Scroll, one of the Dead Sea Scrolls, written during the Second Temple period
Kfar Bar'am, an ancient Jewish village, abandoned some time between the 7th–13th centuries CE.
The 13th-century Ramban Synagogue in Jerusalem
Jews at the Western Wall in the 1870s
The First Zionist Congress (1897) in Basel, Switzerland
UN Map, "Palestine plan of partition with economic union"
Territory held by Israel: The Sinai Peninsula was returned to Egypt in 1982.
Israel's 1980 law declared that "Jerusalem, complete and united, is the capital of Israel."
Shimon Peres (left) with Yitzhak Rabin (center) and King Hussein of Jordan (right), prior to signing the Israel–Jordan peace treaty in 1994.
The site of the 2001 Tel Aviv Dolphinarium discotheque massacre, in which 21 Israelis were killed.
Köppen climate classification map of Israel and the Golan Heights
Population pyramid of Israel
Immigration to Israel in the years 1948–2015. The two peaks were in 1949 and 1990.
Road sign in Hebrew, Arabic, and English
The Dome of the Rock and the Western Wall, Jerusalem.
Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center at Bar-Ilan University
Mount Scopus Campus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
The Knesset chamber, home to the Israeli parliament
Political system of state of Israel
Supreme Court of Israel, Givat Ram, Jerusalem
Map of Israel showing the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, and the Golan Heights
Israeli West Bank barrier separating Israel and the West Bank
Area C of the West Bank, controlled by Israel under Oslo Accords, in blue and red, in December 2011
Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat at the signing ceremony of the Oslo Accords with then US President Bill Clinton
Squad commanders exercise at Eliakim training base in 2012
Iron Dome is the world's first operational anti-artillery rocket defense system.
Change in per capita GDP of Israel since 1950. Figures are inflation-adjusted to 2011 International dollars.
The Diamond Exchange District in Ramat Gan
Tel Aviv Stock Exchange. Its building is optimized for computer trading, with systems located in an underground bunker to keep the exchange active during emergencies.
Matam high-tech park in Haifa
The world's largest solar parabolic dish at the Ben-Gurion National Solar Energy Center.
Ben Gurion International Airport
Ein Bokek resort on the shore of the Dead Sea
Shmuel Yosef Agnon, laureate of the Nobel Prize in Literature
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Zubin Mehta
Shrine of the Book, repository of the Dead Sea Scrolls in Jerusalem
A meal including falafel, hummus, French fries and Israeli salad
Teddy Stadium of Jerusalem
Boris Gelfand, chess Grandmaster

Country in Western Asia.

- Israel

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Jerusalem

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City in Western Asia.

City in Western Asia.

Close up of the Khirbet Beit Lei inscription, showing the earliest extra-biblical Hebrew writing of the word Jerusalem, dated to the seventh or sixth century BCE
Stepped Stone Structure in the City of David, the ancient core of Jerusalem during the Bronze Age and Iron Age
The Siloam Inscription, written in Biblical Hebrew, commemorates the construction of the Siloam tunnel (c. 700 BCE)
Modern-day reconstruction of Jerusalem during the reign of Solomon (10th century BCE). Solomon's Temple appears on top.
Holyland Model of Jerusalem, depicting the city during the late Second Temple period. First created in 1966, it is continuously updated according to advancing archaeological knowledge
A coin issued by the Jewish rebels in 68 CE. Obverse: "Shekel, Israel. Year 3". Reverse: "Jerusalem the Holy", in the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet
Stones from the Western Wall of the Temple Mount thrown during the Roman Siege of Jerusalem in 70 CE
The Siege and Destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans (David Roberts, 1850)
Jerusalem mural depicting the Cardo during the Byzantine period.
1455 painting of the Holy Land. Jerusalem is viewed from the west; the octagonal Dome of the Rock stands left of Al-Aqsa, shown as a church, and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre stands on the left side of the picture.
Medieval illustration of capture of Jerusalem during the First Crusade, 1099.
Jerusalem, from 'Peregrinatio in Terram Sanctam' by Bernhard von Breydenbach (1486)
Topographic map of the city, c. 1600.
1844 daguerreotype by Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey (the earliest photograph of the city).
William McLean's 1918 plan was the first urban planning scheme for Jerusalem. It laid the foundations for what became West Jerusalem and East Jerusalem.
Jerusalem on VE Day, 8 May 1945.
Map of East Jerusalem (2010)
The Knesset houses the legislature of Israel
Supreme Court of Israel
Israeli Foreign Ministry building
Orient House in East Jerusalem that served as the headquarters of the PLO in the 1980s and 1990s. It was closed by Israel in 2001, two days after the Sbarro restaurant suicide bombing.
Snow visible on roofs in the Old City of Jerusalem.
Rehavia and Kiryat Wolfson, two Jewish neighborhoods, as seen from Givat Ram
Sheikh Jarrah, a predominantly Arab neighborhood on the road to Mount Scopus.
Sign in Armenian in the Armenian Quarter.
The Old City is home to many sites of seminal religious importance for the three major Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Bank of Israel
Har Hotzvim high-tech park
Mamilla Mall adorned with upscale shops stands just outside the Old City Walls.
Holyland Tower, Jerusalem's tallest building
Jerusalem Chords Bridge
Light Rail tram on Jaffa Road
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus campus
Hand in Hand, a bilingual Jewish-Arab school in Jerusalem
Hebron Yeshiva in Givat Mordechai neighborhood
The Shrine of the Book, housing the Dead Sea Scrolls, at the Israel Museum
Jerusalem Biblical Zoo
National Library of Israel
Teddy Stadium, Malha
Pais Arena
Tower of David citadel and the Ottoman walls
Ben-Zakai synagogue, photo taken in 1893
Guesthouse in Mishkenot Sha'ananim, the first Jewish neighborhood built outside the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem (1860), on a hill directly across from Mount Zion.
Israeli policemen meet a Jordanian Legionnaire near the Mandelbaum Gate ({{Circa|1950}}).
King Hussein of Jordan flying over the Temple Mount in East Jerusalem when it was under Jordanian control, 1965.
Astronauts' view of Jerusalem.
Sunset aerial photograph of the Mount of Olives.
The Temple Mount, the site of the two former Jewish Temples, is the holiest spot in Judaism
The Western Wall, also known as the Wailing Wall and the Kotel, is a remnant of the Second Temple and the holiest place where Jews are permitted to pray
The Church of the Holy Sepulchre contains the two holiest sites in Christianity: the site where Jesus was crucified, and Jesus's empty tomb, where he is believed by Christians to have been buried and resurrected.
Al-Aqsa Mosque, the third holiest site in Sunni Islam. Muslims believe that Muhammad was transported from the Great Mosque of Mecca to this location during the Night Journey.
The Garden Tomb – a new holy site established by British Protestants in the 19th century
Demographic history of Jerusalem by religion based on available data
Teddy Stadium, Malha

The city straddles the Green Line between Israel and the West Bank; both Israelis and Palestinians claim Jerusalem as their capital.

Map of the military movements and territories occupied during the Six-Day War. The territory of Israel is colored royal blue on this map, while the territories captured by Israel during the war are depicted in various shades of green.

Six-Day War

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Map of the military movements and territories occupied during the Six-Day War. The territory of Israel is colored royal blue on this map, while the territories captured by Israel during the war are depicted in various shades of green.
On 22 May 1967, President Nasser addressed his pilots at Bir Gifgafa Airfield in Sinai: "The Jews are threatening war—we say to them ahlan wa-sahlan (welcome)!"
Israeli troops examine destroyed Egyptian aircraft
Dassault Mirage at the Israeli Air Force Museum. Operation Focus was mainly conducted using French built aircraft.
Conquest of Sinai. 5–6 June 1967
People in a bomb shelter at Kfar Maimon
Israeli reconnaissance forces from the "Shaked" unit in Sinai during the war
Major General Ariel Sharon during the Battle of Abu-Ageila
Israeli Armor of the Six-Day War: pictured here the AMX 13
Conquest of Sinai. 7–8 June 1967
An Israeli gunboat passes through the Straits of Tiran near Sharm El Sheikh.
The Jordan salient, 5–7 June.
Israeli paratroopers flush out Jordanian soldiers from trenches during the Battle of Ammunition Hill.
Silhouette of Israeli paratroops advancing on Ammunition Hill.
An Israeli airstrike near the Augusta-Victoria Hospital
David Rubinger's photograph of IDF paratroopers at Jerusalem's Western Wall shortly after its capture. The soldiers in the foreground are (from left) Zion Karasenti, Yitzhak Yifat, and Haim Oshri.
From left, General Uzi Narkiss, Defense Minister Moshe Dayan, and Chief of Staff Lt. General Yitzhak Rabin in the Old City of Jerusalem after its fall to Israeli forces
The Battle of Golan Heights, 9–10 June.
People in a bomb shelter at Kibbutz Dan
Israeli tanks advancing on the Golan Heights. June 1967

The Six-Day War (מִלְחֶמֶת שֵׁשֶׁת הַיָּמִים; النكسة or حرب 1967), also known as the June War, the 1967 Arab–Israeli War or the Third Arab–Israeli War, was an armed conflict fought from 5 to 10 June 1967 between Israel and a coalition of Arab states primarily comprising Jordan, Syria and Egypt (then known as United Arab Republic).

Jordan

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Country in Western Asia.

Country in Western Asia.

The 'Ain Ghazal Statues (c. 7250 BC) of Amman are some of the oldest human statues ever found.
The Mesha Stele (c. 840 BC) records the glory of Mesha, King of Moab
Al-Khazneh in Petra (c. 1st century AD), is believed to be the mausoleum of the Arab Nabataean King Aretas IV.
The Oval Forum of Jerash (c. 1st century AD), then member of the ten-city Roman league, the Decapolis. Seven out of the ten Decapolis cities are present in modern-day Jordan.
The earliest detailed map of the land which became Jordan, showing the travels of Johann Ludwig Burckhardt (the first European to see Petra since the Crusades) in 1822
Soldiers of the Hashemite-led Arab Army holding the flag of the Great Arab Revolt in 1916
Al-Salt residents gather on 20 August 1920 during the British High Commissioner's visit to Transjordan.
King Abdullah I on 25 May 1946 reading the declaration of independence.
King Hussein on 21 March 1968 checking an abandoned Israeli tank in the aftermath of the Battle of Karameh.
Army Chief Habis Majali and Prime Minister Wasfi Tal during a military parade in 1970, two widely acclaimed national figures.
Wadi Rum's resemblance to the surface of Mars has made it a popular filming and tourist attraction.
The Dead Sea is the lowest point on earth.
A forest in Ajloun, northern Jordan.
The House of Representatives during a parliamentary session
U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump with King Abdullah II and Queen Rania of Jordan at the White House, 2017.
An Amman City Centre Police patrol vehicle.
Change in per capita GDP of Jordan, 1950–2018. Figures are inflation-adjusted to 2011 International Geary-Khamis dollars.
View of a part of the capital Amman
Queen Alia International Airport near Amman was chosen as the best airport in the Middle East for 2014 and 2015 by ASQ.
Al-Maghtas ruins on the Jordanian side of the Jordan River, believed by many to have been the location of the Baptism of Jesus and the ministry of John the Baptist
The Dana Biosphere Reserve in southern Jordan lies along the Jordan Trail, a hiking path that is gaining popularity
A phosphate train at Ram station
The Aqaba Flagpole in the southernmost city of Aqaba, Jordan's only coastal outlet
The 117 MW Tafila Wind Farm in southern Jordan is the first and largest onshore wind farm in the Middle East.
An aerial view of a portion of the Zaatari refugee camp which contains a population of 80,000 Syrian refugees, the largest Syrian refugee camp in the world.
Jordanian school girls pictured reading in a public school. Jordan's total youth female literacy rate (15 – 24 years) was 99.37% in 2015.
Jordanian folklore band playing bagpipes in Jerash.
Mansaf, the traditional dish of Jordan. Inspired from Bedouin culture, it is a symbol of Jordanian hospitality.

Jordan is bordered by Saudi Arabia to the south and east, Iraq to the northeast, Syria to the north, and the Palestinian West Bank, Israel, and the Dead Sea to the west.

City of Bethlehem, West Bank

West Bank

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Landlocked territory near the coast of the Mediterranean in Western Asia.

Landlocked territory near the coast of the Mediterranean in Western Asia.

City of Bethlehem, West Bank
The Cave of the Patriarchs is one of the most famous holy sites in the region.
King Hussein flying over the Temple Mount in Jerusalem when it was under Jordanian control, 1965
City of Jericho, West Bank
U.S. President George Bush and Mahmoud Abbas in Ramallah, 2008
View of the Judaean Mountains from Ramallah
Map of West Bank settlements and closures in January 2006: Yellow = Palestinian urban centers. Light pink = closed military areas or settlement boundary areas or areas isolated by the Israeli West Bank barrier; dark pink = settlements, outposts or military bases. The black line = route of the Barrier
Greater Jerusalem, May 2006. CIA remote sensing map showing areas considered settlements, plus refugee camps, fences, walls, etc.
250px
West Bank barrier (Separating Wall)
Qalandiya Checkpoint between Ramallah and Jerusalem
Northern Governorates
Palestinian girl in Nablus
Jewish children in Tal Menashe.
Settlement of Ariel
Residential neighborhood of Ramallah
Road in the West Bank
Checkpoint before entering Jericho, 2005

It is bordered by Jordan and the Dead Sea to the east and by Israel (see Green Line) to the south, west, and north.

Captain Avraham "Bren" Adan raising the Ink Flag at Umm Rashrash (a site now in Eilat), marking the end of the war

1948 Arab–Israeli War

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The second and final stage of the 1947–1949 Palestine war.

The second and final stage of the 1947–1949 Palestine war.

Captain Avraham "Bren" Adan raising the Ink Flag at Umm Rashrash (a site now in Eilat), marking the end of the war
Proposed separation of Palestine
Palmach M4 Sherman tank leading a convoy
An Israeli Avia S-199, in June 1948
King Abdullah outside the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, 29 May 1948, the day after Jordanian forces took control of the Old City in the Battle for Jerusalem
Sherman tanks of the Israeli 8th Armoured Brigade, 1948
A Cromwell tank
IDF soldiers of the Samson's Foxes unit advance in a captured Egyptian Bren Gun carrier.
Vickers light tanks in the desert
Arab offensive, 15 May – 10 June 1948
A "Butterfly" improvised armoured car of the Haganah at Kibbutz Dorot in the Negev, Israel 1948. The armoured car is based on CMP-15 truck. The car has brought supply to the kibbutz. The Negev Kibbutz's children were later evacuated by those cars from their kibbutz, before an expected Egyptian Army attack.
Israeli soldiers in Nirim
Israeli soldiers in Negba
Mathematics professor Michael Fekete, the Provost of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, with his water quota, during the siege of Jerusalem
Israeli soldiers in Afula
Syrian R-35 light tank destroyed at Degania Alef
Kaukji, the Arab Liberation Army commander
An Egyptian Spitfire shot down over Tel Aviv on 15 May 1948
Volunteers evacuating a wounded man during Egyptian bombardment of Tel Aviv.
Avia S-199 Israeli 1st fighter aircraft
Israeli Spitfire F Mk
Israeli B-17s in flight
Northland in Greenland circa 1944 which became the Israeli INS Eilat
Palestine Military Situation, 11 June 1948. Truman Papers
Altalena burning near Tel Aviv beach
UN Palestine mediator, Folke Bernadotte, assassinated in September 1948 by the militant group Lehi
An Egyptian artillery piece captured by battalion 53 of the Givati Brigade.
Israeli soldiers in Lod (Lydda) or Ramle
Israeli armoured vehicles in Lydda airport after the town's capture by Israeli forces
Arab forces surrender to the victorious Israelis in Ramla.
Beit Horon Battalion soldiers in the Russian Compound in Jerusalem, 1948
October battles
An Israeli mortar team outside Safsaf in October 1948
Israeli soldiers attack Sasa during Operation Hiram, October 1948.
Israeli troops occupying abandoned Egyptian trenches at Huleiqat, October 1948
IDF forces in Beersheba during Operation Yoav
IDF artillery unit in the Negev
IDF forces near Bayt Nattif (near Hebron) after it was captured. Oct 1948.
An Israeli convoy in the Negev during Operation Horev
The funeral of a Royal Air Force pilot killed during a clash with the Israeli Air Force

On 14 May 1948, David Ben-Gurion declared the establishment of the State of Israel and the 1948 Palestine war entered its second phase with the intervention of the Arab state armies and the beginning of the 1948 Arab–Israeli War.

Theodor Herzl was the founder of the Modern Zionist movement. In his 1896 pamphlet Der Judenstaat, he envisioned the founding of a future independent Jewish state during the 20th century.

Zionism

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Nationalist movement that espouses the establishment of, and support for a homeland for the Jewish people centered in the area roughly corresponding to the Land of Israel, the region of Palestine, Canaan, or the Holy Land, on the basis of a long Jewish connection and attachment to that land.

Nationalist movement that espouses the establishment of, and support for a homeland for the Jewish people centered in the area roughly corresponding to the Land of Israel, the region of Palestine, Canaan, or the Holy Land, on the basis of a long Jewish connection and attachment to that land.

Theodor Herzl was the founder of the Modern Zionist movement. In his 1896 pamphlet Der Judenstaat, he envisioned the founding of a future independent Jewish state during the 20th century.
Flag of the State of Israel, established in 1948. A similar version was designed for the Zionist Movement in 1891.
"Hezekiah [..] king of Judah" - Royal seal written in the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet, unearthed in Jerusalem
Coin of the Bar-Kokhba revolt (132-135 CE). Front shows trumpets surrounded by "To the freedom of Jerusalem". Back shows a lyre surrounded by "Year two to the freedom of Israel"
The 15th-century Abuhav synagogue, established by Sephardic Jews in Safed, Northern Israel.
"Memorandum to Protestant Monarchs of Europe for the restoration of the Jews to Palestine", published in the Colonial Times, in 1841
The Great Synagogue of Rishon LeZion was founded in 1885.
Front page of The Jewish Chronicle, January 17, 1896, showing an article by Theodor Herzl (the father of political Zionism) a month prior to the publication of his pamphlet Der Judenstaat
The delegates at the First Zionist Congress, held in Basel, Switzerland (1897)
The Jewish Zionist Youth Movement in Tallinn, Estonia in 1933
Palestine as claimed by the World Zionist Organization in 1919 at the Paris Peace Conference
During the 1919 Paris Peace Conference, an Inter-Allied Commission was sent to Palestine to assess the views of the local population; the report summarized the arguments received from petitioners for and against Zionism.
David Ben-Gurion proclaiming Israel's independence beneath a large portrait of Theodor Herzl
Arab offensive at the beginning of the 1948 Arab-Israeli war
Yemenite Jews on their way to Israel during Operation Magic Carpet
Israeli author Amos Oz, who today is described as the 'aristocrat' of Labor Zionism
Israeli Jewish youth from the Socialist Zionist youth movement No'al, meeting with Jewish resistance fighter Simcha Rotem. Founded in 1924, No'al is one of the largest Zionist Youth movements.
Kibbutznikiyot (female Kibbutz members) in Mishmar HaEmek, during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. The Kibbutz is the historical heartland of Labor Zionism.
Ze'ev Jabotinsky, founder of Revisionist Zionism
Israeli Jews praying at the Western Wall, a remnant of the Second Jewish Temple, expanded by Herod the Great
Martin Luther King Jr. was a notable Christian supporter of Israel and Zionism.
Israeli Druze Scouts march to Jethro's tomb. Today, thousands of Israeli Druze belong to 'Druze Zionist' movements.
The Palestinian Arab Christian-owned Falastin newspaper featuring a caricature on its June 18, 1936, edition showing Zionism as a crocodile under the protection of a British officer telling Palestinian Arabs: "Don't be afraid!!! I will swallow you peacefully...".
Two Neturei Karta members join in a large anti-Israel demonstration in Berlin, alongside Iranian and Hezbollah flags.
Theodor Herzl was the founder of the Modern Zionist movement. In his 1896 pamphlet Der Judenstaat, he envisioned the founding of a future independent Jewish state during the 20th century.

Since the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, Zionism has continued primarily to advocate on behalf of Israel and to address threats to its continued existence and security.

Gaza Strip

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Palestinian enclave on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea.

Palestinian enclave on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea.

Gaza City skyline, 2007.
Downtown Gaza, 2012.
Beit Hanoun region of Gaza in August 2014, after Israeli bombardments.
British artillery battery in front of Gaza, 1917
Gaza War Cemetery
Che Guevara visiting Gaza in 1959
View of Gaza during the 2000s.
Barrier fence
The Al Deira Hotel on the Gaza coast, 2009
Buildings damaged during Operation "Cast Lead".
Monthly rocket and mortar hits in Israel, 2008.
Israelis killed by Palestinians in Israel ( blue ) and Palestinians killed by Israelis in Gaza ( red )
Sea-view from the Al Deira Hotel on the Gaza coast
A resort in the Gaza Strip built on the location of the former Israeli settlement of Netzarim
Backyard industry
Muslim worshippers in Gaza
Damaged UN school and remmants of the Ministry of Interior in Gaza City, December 2012
Watchtower on the border between Rafah and Egypt.
Tent camp, April 2009, after Cast Lead.
University College of Applied Sciences, the largest college in Gaza
Islamic University of Gaza
Gaza amusement park.
Damaged part of Gaza airport, May 2002

It borders Egypt on the southwest for 11 km and Israel on the east and north along a 51 km border.

Mandatory Palestine

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Geopolitical entity established between 1920 and 1948 in the region of Palestine under the terms of the League of Nations Mandate for Palestine.

Geopolitical entity established between 1920 and 1948 in the region of Palestine under the terms of the League of Nations Mandate for Palestine.

Mandatory Palestine in 1946
Flag of the High Commissioner
Mandatory Palestine in 1946
The formal transfer of Jerusalem to British rule, with a "native priest" reading the proclamation from the steps of the Tower of David
The arrival of Sir Herbert Samuel. From left to right: T. E. Lawrence, Emir Abdullah, Air Marshal Sir Geoffrey Salmond, Sir Wyndham Deedes and others
An Arab "protest gathering" in session, in the Rawdat el Maaref hall, 1929. From left to right : unknown – Amin al-Husayni – Musa al-Husayni – Raghib al-Nashashibi – unknown
Arab revolt against the British
Jewish demonstration against White Paper in Jerusalem in 1939
Australian soldiers in Tel Aviv in 1942
Jewish Brigade headquarters under the Union Flag and Jewish flag
Jerusalem on VE Day, 8 May 1945
The UN Partition Plan
British troops leaving Haifa in 1948
Hoisting of the Yishuv flag in Tel Aviv, 1 January 1948
A 1930 protest in Jerusalem against the British Mandate by Arab women. The sign reads "No dialogue, no negotiations until termination of the Mandate."
The Palestinian Arab Christian-owned Falastin newspaper featuring a caricature on its 18 June 1936 edition showing Zionism as a crocodile under the protection of a British officer telling Palestinian Arabs: "don't be afraid!!! I will swallow you peacefully...."
Jewish immigration to Mandatory Palestine from 1920 to 1945
Map of Palestinian land ownership by sub-district (1945) originally published in the Village Statistics, 1945
Palestinian index of villages and settlements, showing land in Jewish possession as of 31 December 1944
Land classification as prescribed in 1940
Population distribution near the end of the Mandate
Christian Arab boys at the Jerusalem YMCA, 1938
Jerusalem City Hall, 1939
General Allenby's final attacks of the Palestine Campaign gave Britain control of the area.
Field Marshal Allenby entering Jerusalem with British troops on 11 December 1917
General Watson meeting with the Mayor of Jerusalem in December 1917
The surrender of Jerusalem by the Ottomans to the British on 9 December 1917 following the Battle of Jerusalem
Main post office, Jaffa Road, Jerusalem
The Rockefeller Museum, built in Jerusalem during the British Mandate
Main post office, Jaffa
The Anglo-Palestine Bank
The Western Wall, 1933
Supreme Military Tribunal of the British Mandate, Kiryat Shmuel, Jerusalem
YMCA in Jerusalem, built during the British Mandate
"Bevingrad" in Jerusalem, Russian Compound behind barbed wire
Mandate-era mailbox, Jerusalem
1941 currency coin
Movement and curfew pass, issued under the authority of the British Military Commander, East Palestine, 1946
Map of the municipalities in Mandatory Palestine by population count (1945) 150,000 and more
100,000
50,000
20,000
10,000
5,000
2,000
1,000
500
less than 500
Nomadic regions in the Negev desert

After the failure of the Arab population to accept the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine, the 1947–1949 Palestine war ended with the territory of Mandatory Palestine divided among the State of Israel, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, which annexed territory on the West Bank of the Jordan River, and the Kingdom of Egypt, which established the "All-Palestine Protectorate" in the Gaza Strip.

Tel Aviv

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Tel Aviv is named after Theodor Herzl's 1902 novel, Altneuland ("Old New Land"), for which the title of the Hebrew edition was "Tel Aviv"
Ancient port of Jaffa where, according to the Bible, Jonah set sail into the Mediterranean Sea before being swallowed by a fish
Tel Aviv bus station during the Mandate era
Shadal Street in 1926
Magen David Square in 1936
Crowd outside Dizengoff House (now Independence Hall) to witness the proclamation and signing of Israel's Declaration of Independence in 1948
Azrieli Sarona tower (238.5 metres high), finished in 2017
Arlozorov Young Towers 1, finished in 2020
Tel Aviv seen from space in 2003
City plan of Tel Aviv, Israel
Rabin Square and Tel Aviv City Hall looking northwest
Tel Aviv old city hall
The Vladimir Schreiber Institute of Mathematics at Tel Aviv University
Sarona, old Templer houses and modern highrises
The Great Synagogue
The restored Immanuel Church, Jaffa
Kerem HaTeimanim was founded as a predominantly Yemenite Jewish neighborhood in the center of Tel Aviv
1930s Bauhaus (left) and 1920s Eclectic (right) architectural styles
The well-known eclectic Levin House, by Yehuda Magidovitch, backed by skyscrapers
Bauhaus Museum displaying Bauhaus furnishings
The Azrieli Center complex contains some of the tallest skyscrapers in Tel Aviv
Nehoshtan Tower, Neve Tzedek
The "First International Bank Tower" in Tel Aviv's financial district
Tel Aviv at night
Tel Aviv Pride is the largest annual pride parade in the Middle East and Asia
Tel Aviv Museum of Art, the Herta and Paul Amir Building
The Tel Aviv Marathon going through Hayarkon Park
Bloomfield Stadium
Menora Mivtachim Arena
Drive in Arena
IDF soldiers cleaning the beaches at Tel Aviv, which have scored highly in environmental tests
Charles Clore Park
Ayalon Highway, which runs through Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv Central Railway Station
Begin Road as seen from Azrieli Center
Tel-O-Fun bicycle rental system
Ichilov Hospital, part of Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center
Tel Aviv 1943 1:20,000
Tel Aviv 1945 1:250,000
Tel Aviv, Allenby Street, 1940
Tel Aviv port 1939
Dizengoff Square in the 1940s
Israeli Air Force F-16I Sufas over Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv Dolphinarium, demolished in 2018, site of the 2001 Dolphinarium discotheque suicide bombing, in which 21 Israelis, mostly teenagers, were killed
The Suzanne Dellal Center for Dance and Theater
A street café in Florentin, Tel Aviv
Heichal HaTarbut theatre, home to the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra
Hayarkon Park is the largest city park in Tel Aviv
Early evening at the beach
Tel Aviv is named after Theodor Herzl's 1902 novel, Altneuland ("Old New Land"), for which the title of the Hebrew translation by Nahum Sokolow was "Tel Aviv"

Tel Aviv-Yafo (תֵּל־אָבִיב-יָפוֹ, Tēl-ʾĀvīv-Yāfō ; تَلّ أَبِيب – يَافَا, Tall ʾAbīb-Yāfā), often referred to as just Tel Aviv, is the most populous city in the Gush Dan metropolitan area of Israel.

Map of Canaan

Jews

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Ethnoreligious group and nation originating from the Israelites and Hebrews of historical Israel and Judah.

Ethnoreligious group and nation originating from the Israelites and Hebrews of historical Israel and Judah.

Map of Canaan
Egyptian depiction of the visit of Western Asiatics in colorful garments, labeled as Aamu. The painting is from the tomb of a 12th dynasty official Khnumhotep II at Beni Hasan, and dated to c. 1900 BCE. Their nearest Biblical contemporaries were the earliest of Hebrews, such as Abraham and Joseph.
Depiction of King Jehu, tenth king of the northern Kingdom of Israel, on the Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III, 841–840 BCE. This is "the only portrayal we have in ancient Near Eastern art of an Israelite or Judaean monarch".
Tombstone of the Maharal in the Old Jewish Cemetery, Prague. The tombstones are inscribed in Hebrew.
Bible manuscript in Hebrew, 14th century. Hebrew language and alphabet were the cornerstones of the Jewish national identity in antiquity.
Ashkenazi Jews of late-19th-century Eastern Europe portrayed in Jews Praying in the Synagogue on Yom Kippur (1878), by Maurycy Gottlieb
Sephardi Jewish couple from Sarajevo in traditional clothing. Photo taken in 1900.
Yemenite Jew blows shofar, 1947
New York City is home to 1.1 million Jews, making it the largest Jewish community outside of Israel.
Jewish people in Jerusalem, Israel
In this Rosh Hashana greeting card from the early 1900s, Russian Jews, packs in hand, gaze at the American relatives beckoning them to the United States. Over two million Jews fled the pogroms of the Russian Empire to the safety of the U.S. between 1881 and 1924.
A menorah dominating the main square in Birobidzhan. An estimated 70,000 Jews live in Siberia.
The Jewish Zionist Youth Movement in Tallinn, Estonia on 1 September 1933.
The Roman Emperor Nero sends Vespasian with an army to destroy the Jews, 69 CE.
World War I poster showing a soldier cutting the bonds from a Jewish man, who says, "You have cut my bonds and set me free—now let me help you set others free!"
Jews in Minsk, 1941. Before World War II some 40 percent of the population was Jewish. By the time the Red Army retook the city on 3 July 1944, there were only a few Jewish survivors.
Expulsions of Jews in Europe from 1100 to 1600
Etching of the expulsion of the Jews from Frankfurt in 1614. The text says: "1380 persons old and young were counted at the exit of the gate".
Jews fleeing pogroms, 1882
Praying at the Western Wall
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The modern State of Israel is the only country where Jews form a majority of the population.