A report on Israel

The Merneptah Stele (13th century BCE). The majority of biblical archeologists translate a set of hieroglyphs as "Israel," the first instance of the name in the record.
The Large Stone Structure, an archaeological site in Jerusalem
Map of Israel and Judah in the 9th century BCE
Portion of the Temple Scroll, one of the Dead Sea Scrolls, written during the Second Temple period
Kfar Bar'am, an ancient Jewish village, abandoned some time between the 7th–13th centuries CE.
The 13th-century Ramban Synagogue in Jerusalem
Jews at the Western Wall in the 1870s
The First Zionist Congress (1897) in Basel, Switzerland
UN Map, "Palestine plan of partition with economic union"
Territory held by Israel: The Sinai Peninsula was returned to Egypt in 1982.
Israel's 1980 law declared that "Jerusalem, complete and united, is the capital of Israel."
Shimon Peres (left) with Yitzhak Rabin (center) and King Hussein of Jordan (right), prior to signing the Israel–Jordan peace treaty in 1994.
The site of the 2001 Tel Aviv Dolphinarium discotheque massacre, in which 21 Israelis were killed.
Köppen climate classification map of Israel and the Golan Heights
Population pyramid of Israel
Immigration to Israel in the years 1948–2015. The two peaks were in 1949 and 1990.
Road sign in Hebrew, Arabic, and English
The Dome of the Rock and the Western Wall, Jerusalem.
Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center at Bar-Ilan University
Mount Scopus Campus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
The Knesset chamber, home to the Israeli parliament
Political system of state of Israel
Supreme Court of Israel, Givat Ram, Jerusalem
Map of Israel showing the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, and the Golan Heights
Israeli West Bank barrier separating Israel and the West Bank
Area C of the West Bank, controlled by Israel under Oslo Accords, in blue and red, in December 2011
Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat at the signing ceremony of the Oslo Accords with then US President Bill Clinton
Squad commanders exercise at Eliakim training base in 2012
Iron Dome is the world's first operational anti-artillery rocket defense system.
Change in per capita GDP of Israel since 1950. Figures are inflation-adjusted to 2011 International dollars.
The Diamond Exchange District in Ramat Gan
Tel Aviv Stock Exchange. Its building is optimized for computer trading, with systems located in an underground bunker to keep the exchange active during emergencies.
Matam high-tech park in Haifa
The world's largest solar parabolic dish at the Ben-Gurion National Solar Energy Center.
Ben Gurion International Airport
Ein Bokek resort on the shore of the Dead Sea
Shmuel Yosef Agnon, laureate of the Nobel Prize in Literature
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Zubin Mehta
Shrine of the Book, repository of the Dead Sea Scrolls in Jerusalem
A meal including falafel, hummus, French fries and Israeli salad
Teddy Stadium of Jerusalem
Boris Gelfand, chess Grandmaster

Country in Western Asia.

- Israel

500 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Clockwise from top: USAF F-15Es, F-16s, and an F-15C flying over burning Kuwaiti oil wells; British troops from the Staffordshire Regiment in Operation Granby; camera view from a Lockheed AC-130; the Highway of Death; M728 Combat Engineer Vehicle

Gulf War

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Armed campaign waged by a United States-led coalition of 35 countries against Iraq in response to the Iraqi invasion and annexation of Kuwait.

Armed campaign waged by a United States-led coalition of 35 countries against Iraq in response to the Iraqi invasion and annexation of Kuwait.

Clockwise from top: USAF F-15Es, F-16s, and an F-15C flying over burning Kuwaiti oil wells; British troops from the Staffordshire Regiment in Operation Granby; camera view from a Lockheed AC-130; the Highway of Death; M728 Combat Engineer Vehicle
Donald Rumsfeld, US special envoy to the Middle East, meets Saddam Hussein on 19–20 December 1983.
Map of Kuwait
Kuwaiti Armed Forces Chieftain main battle tanks
Kuwait Air Force McDonnell Douglas A-4KU Skyhawk ground-attack aircraft
Lion of Babylon main battle tanks, common Iraqi battle tank used in the Gulf War by the Iraqi Army.
An Iraqi Air Force Bell 214ST transport helicopter, after being captured by a US Marine Corps unit at the start of the ground phase of Operation Desert Storm
Kuwaiti Armed Forces M-84 main battle tanks
President Bush visiting American troops in Saudi Arabia on Thanksgiving Day, 1990
American F-15Es parked in Saudi Arabia during Operation Desert Shield
US Army soldiers from the 11th Air Defense Artillery Brigade during the Gulf War
Countries that deployed coalition forces or provided support (On behalf of Afghanistan, 300 Mujaheddin joined the coalition on 11 February 1991. Niger contributed 480 troops to guard shrines in Mecca and Medina on 15 January 1991.)
General Norman Schwarzkopf, Jr. and President George Bush visit US troops in Saudi Arabia on Thanksgiving Day, 1990.
Dick Cheney meets with Prince Sultan, Minister of Defence and Aviation in Saudi Arabia to discuss how to handle the invasion of Kuwait.
Gen. Colin Powell (left), Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf Jr., and Paul Wolfowitz (right) listen as Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney addresses reporters regarding the 1991 Gulf War.
The USAF F-117 Nighthawk, one of the key aircraft used in Operation Desert Storm
Aftermath of Amiriyah shelter bombing by U.S. Air Force, which killed at least 408 civilians in Baghdad
An Iraqi T-54A or Type 59 tank lies destroyed after a coalition bombing attack during Operation Desert Storm.
Scud Transporter Erector Launcher (TEL) with missile in upright position
Aftermath of an Iraq Armed Forces strike on US barracks
Military operations during Khafji's liberation
Marine Artillery played a huge factor in disrupting Iraqi counterattacks during the 1st Gulf War, February 1991.
Iraqi tanks destroyed by Task Force 1-41 Infantry, February 1991
Soldiers of 2nd Platoon, Company C, 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment pose with a captured Iraqi tank, February 1991
An Iraqi Republican Guard T-55 tank destroyed by Task Force 1–41 Infantry, February 1991
American AH-64 Apache helicopters proved to be very effective weapons during the 1991 Gulf War.
4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Armored Division (FWD) conducts artillery strikes on Iraqi positions during the 1st Gulf War. 4-3 FA was the primary fire support battalion for Task Force 1-41 during the 1st Gulf War, February 1991.
Battery C, 4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Armored Division (FWD) moves into position to conduct fire missions during the Battle of Norfolk, February 1991.
U. S. M1A1 Abrams tanks move out on a mission during Desert Storm in 1991. A Bradley IFV and logistics convoy can be seen in the background.
A M109A2 howitzer belonging to Battery C, 4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Armored Division (FWD) during the Gulf War, February 1991.
A M60A1 tank with a Track Width Mine Plow, Desert Storm February 1991
British Challenger 1 tanks during the 1st Gulf War. The British Challenger tank was the most efficient tank of the Gulf war suffering no losses while destroying approximately 300 Iraqi tanks during combat operations.
A destroyed Iraqi Army T-55 tank lies among the wreckage of many other Iraqi vehicles, such as trucks, cars and buses, somewhere along the Highway of Death in April 1991.
US M1A1 Abrams tanks from the 3rd Armored Division along the Line of Departure
Two Iraqi T-55 tanks lie abandoned near Kuwait City on 26 February 1991.
The oil fires caused were a result of the scorched earth policy of Iraqi military forces retreating from Kuwait.
Ground troop movements 24–28 February 1991 during Operation Desert Storm
Iraqi T-62 knocked out by 3rd Armored Division fire
Destroyed LAV-25
Aerial view of destroyed Iraqi T-72 tank, BMP-1 and Type 63 armored personnel carriers and trucks on Highway 8 in March 1991
Iraqi 'Saddam' main battle tank destroyed during Operation Desert Storm
Remains of a downed F-16C
A Bradley IFV burns after being hit by Iraqi T-72 fire.
Civilians and coalition military forces wave Kuwaiti and Saudi Arabian flags as they celebrate the retreat of Iraqi forces from Kuwait.
Coalition troops from Egypt, Syria, Oman, France, and Kuwait during Operation Desert Storm
HMAS Sydney in the Persian Gulf in 1991
Argentine Navy Alouette III helicopter on board, February 1991
Canadian CF-18 Hornets participated in combat during the Gulf War.
French and American soldiers inspecting an Iraqi Type 69 tank destroyed by the French Division Daguet during Operation Desert Storm
One of the Italian tornadoes used in the operation
British Army Challenger 1 main battle tank during Operation Desert Storm
Iraqi Kurds fleeing to Turkey shortly after the war
Sailors from a US Navy honor guard carry Navy pilot Scott Speicher's remains.
Approximate area and major clashes in which DU rounds were used
Destroyed Iraqi civilian and military vehicles on the Highway of Death
An armored bulldozer similar to the ones used in the attack
Oil well fires rage outside Kuwait City in 1991.
USS Missouri launching a Tomahawk missile. The Gulf War was the last conflict in which battleships were deployed in a combat role.
Military personnel examine the remains of a Scud.

As the Iraqi missile campaign against Israel failed to generate the desired response, Iraq also launched Scud missiles at coalition targets stationed in Saudi Arabia.

United Nations

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Intergovernmental organization whose purposes are to maintain international peace and security, develop friendly relations among nations, achieve international cooperation, and be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations.

Intergovernmental organization whose purposes are to maintain international peace and security, develop friendly relations among nations, achieve international cooperation, and be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations.

Members of the United Nations
1943 sketch by Franklin Roosevelt of the UN original three branches: The Four Policemen, an executive branch, and an international assembly of forty UN member states
The UN in 1945: founding members in light blue, protectorates and territories of the founding members in dark blue
Dag Hammarskjöld was a particularly active secretary-general from 1953 until his death in 1961.
Kofi Annan, secretary-general from 1997 to 2006
Flags of member nations at the United Nations Headquarters, seen in 2007
Mikhail Gorbachev, Soviet general secretary, addressing the UN General Assembly in December 1988
Colin Powell, the US Secretary of State, demonstrates a vial with alleged Iraq chemical weapon probes to the UN Security Council on Iraq war hearings, 5 February 2003
Current secretary-general, António Guterres
The ICJ ruled that Kosovo's unilateral declaration of independence from Serbia in 2008 did not violate international law.
Under Sukarno, Indonesia became the first and only country to leave the United Nations.
A Nepalese soldier on a peacekeeping deployment providing security at a rice distribution site in Haiti during 2010
The UN Buffer Zone in Cyprus was established in 1974 following the Turkish invasion of Cyprus.
Eleanor Roosevelt with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1949
Three former directors of the Global Smallpox Eradication Programme reading the news that smallpox has been globally eradicated in 1980
In Jordan, UNHCR remains responsible for the Syrian refugees and the Zaatari refugee camp.
The 2001 Nobel Peace Prize to the UN—diploma in the lobby of the UN Headquarters in New York City
Marking of the UN's 70th anniversary – Budapest, 2015

On 29 November 1947, the General Assembly approved a resolution to partition Palestine, approving the creation of the state of Israel.

Anwar Sadat in 1980

Anwar Sadat

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Egyptian politician and military officer who served as the third president of Egypt, from 15 October 1970 until his assassination by fundamentalist army officers on 6 October 1981.

Egyptian politician and military officer who served as the third president of Egypt, from 15 October 1970 until his assassination by fundamentalist army officers on 6 October 1981.

Anwar Sadat in 1980
Sadat graduating from the military college in 1938
Sadat in 1953
Sadat shaking hands with Salah Zulfikar. Cairo, 1976
Top Egyptian leaders in Alexandria, 1968. From left to right: Gamal Abdel Nasser, Sadat, Ali Sabri and Hussein el-Shafei
Sadat (left) shaking hands with Israeli Defense Minister Ezer Weizman, 1978
President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin acknowledge applause during joint session of Congress in Washington, D.C., during which President Jimmy Carter announced the results of the Camp David Accords, 18 September 1978
President Jimmy Carter shaking hands with Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin at the signing of the Egyptian–Israeli Peace Treaty on the grounds of the White House, 1979
President Sadat with U.S. Senator Joe Biden (left), and U.S. Senator Frank Church (center), at Camp David, 1979.
Queen Farah Diba, President Anwar Sadat and Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi in Tehran in 1975
Yuri Gagarin with Sadat and Gamal Abdel Nasser in Cairo, 1962

As President, he led Egypt in the Yom Kippur War of 1973 to regain Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, which Israel had occupied since the Six-Day War of 1967, making him a hero in Egypt and, for a time, the wider Arab World.

The Israeli–Egyptian war of Attrition was centered largely on the Suez Canal.

War of Attrition

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The Israeli–Egyptian war of Attrition was centered largely on the Suez Canal.
An Egyptian Ilyushin Il-28 bomber attacks Israeli forces in the Sinai
Israeli naval personnel celebrate their victory after an engagement with Egyptian naval forces near Rumani.
Israeli destroyer INS Eilat that was sunk by the Egyptian Navy, killing forty-seven sailors
Israeli paratroopers in action during the Battle of Karameh in 1968
King Hussein after checking an abandoned Israeli tank in the aftermath of the Battle of Karameh
An Israeli military vehicle on patrol in the Jordan Valley, circa 1968
Israeli air raid against targets in Jordan after firing towards Israel from Jordan, circa 1969
Israeli artillery in action in 1969
President Nasser of Egypt (with binoculars) surveys positions at the Suez Canal in November 1968
F-4E Phantom of the Israeli Air Force. The aircraft was used to good effect as "flying artillery" during the war. Roundel markings on nose credit this aircraft with three aerial kills.
Israeli forces in the Suez Canal area
Israeli Shayetet 13 naval commandos during Operation Bulmus 6
Israeli troops at the Firdan Bridge by the Suez Canal, 1969
A BTR-50 armored personnel carrier being loaded onto an Israeli landing craft as part of Operation Raviv
Soviet/Egyptian S-125 anti-aircraft type missiles in the Suez Canal vicinity
Israeli paratroopers in action during Operation Rhodes
Soviet medal The medal says Москва-Каир (Moscow-Cairo).
Israeli war ribbon signifying participation in the War of Attrition

The War of Attrition (حرب الاستنزاف; מלחמת ההתשה) involved fighting between Israel and Egypt, Jordan, the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO) and their allies from 1967 to 1970.

Alternative version of the emblem of Israel used by the Israeli Government

Cabinet of Israel

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Alternative version of the emblem of Israel used by the Israeli Government

The Cabinet of Israel (officially: ממשלת ישראל Memshelet Yisrael) exercises executive authority in the State of Israel.

Israeli armored personnel carrier in south Lebanon

1982 Lebanon War

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Launched after gunmen from Abu Nidal's organization attempted to assassinate Shlomo Argov, Israel's ambassador to the United Kingdom. Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin blamed Abu Nidal's enemy, the PLO, for the incident, and used the incident as a casus belli for the invasion.

Launched after gunmen from Abu Nidal's organization attempted to assassinate Shlomo Argov, Israel's ambassador to the United Kingdom. Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin blamed Abu Nidal's enemy, the PLO, for the incident, and used the incident as a casus belli for the invasion.

Israeli armored personnel carrier in south Lebanon
An Israeli bombardment of a PLO position on the Lebanese coast
Israeli troops driving towards Beaufort Castle, 1982
Israeli troops in Lebanon, 1982
Israeli armored vehicles disembark from a landing craft during an amphibious landing
An Israeli tank advances past destroyed Syrian tanks during the Battle of Jezzine
A Syrian tank burning on the road outside Jezzine
A wounded Israeli soldier arrives at Rambam Medical Center in Haifa after being evacuated by helicopter
A destroyed airliner at Beirut Airport, 1982.
The Israeli Navy missile boat INS Romach off the coast of Lebanon, August 1982.
An aerial view of the stadium used as an ammunition supply site for the PLO, after Israeli airstrikes in 1982.
IAF Cobra gunships on military exercise. These attack helicopters were successfully employed against Syrian AFVs during the conflict.
The Israeli Merkava Mark I tank was used throughout the First Lebanon War
Syrian anti-tank teams deployed French-made Milan ATGMs during the war in Lebanon in 1982.
Part of a Syrian SA-6 site built near the Beirut-Damascus highway, and overlooking the Bekaa Valley, in early 1982.
Lebanese Army APC, Beirut 1982
Map showing power balance in Lebanon, 1983:
Green – controlled by Syria,
purple – controlled by Christian groups,
yellow – controlled by Israel,
blue – controlled by the United Nations
IDF military patrol near Ras Biada- south Lebanon (1986)
IDF military post Shakuf El-Hardun – south Lebanon (1986)
IDF military patrol above the Litani river- south Lebanon (1987)
Beaufort IDF northern military post- south Lebanon (1995)
IDF military patrol between Aaichiye to Rayhan- south Lebanon (1995)

Continual violence near the Lebanese border occurred between Israel and the PLO starting from 1968; this peaked, following the relocation of PLO bases to Lebanon after the civil war in Jordan.

Nahal Paran, Negev

Negev

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Nahal Paran, Negev
Spring blooms in the Negev
Of the three Acacia species growing in high plateau of the Negev, Acacia pachyceras is the most cold-resistant.
Statue in the Negev desert of Israel
Archaeological ruins in the Negev
In 1871, the first scientifically accurate map of the Negev was published in conjunction with the Ordnance Survey of Palestine and the Palestine Exploration Fund. The red dotted lines have been overlaid to show the modern borders as of today.
A map considered by the British Cabinet in 1918 suggested that the Negev could be included in either Palestine or Egypt.
Rahat, the largest Bedouin city in the Negev
Blueprint Negev mobile homes, 2009
Solar troughs in the Negev
Yatir Forest 2005, produced by Yatir Winery in the Negev
Campus of Midreshet Ben Gurion

The Negev or Negeb (הַנֶּגֶב; ٱلنَّقَب) is a desert and semidesert region of southern Israel.

Map of Gaza

Gaza War (2008–2009)

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Three-week armed conflict between Gaza Strip Palestinian paramilitary groups and the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) that began on 27 December 2008 and ended on 18 January 2009 with a unilateral ceasefire.

Three-week armed conflict between Gaza Strip Palestinian paramilitary groups and the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) that began on 27 December 2008 and ended on 18 January 2009 with a unilateral ceasefire.

Map of Gaza
Palestinians killed by the IDF in Gaza ( red ) and Israelis killed by Palestinians in Israel ( blue ) during January–December 2008 according to B'Tselem
Rocket hits in Israel, January–December 2008
Israeli F-16I of the 107th Squadron preparing for takeoff
Destroyed building in Rafah, 12 January 2009
Explosion in Gaza, 12 January 2009
ISM photo:"Damage to the Zeitoun neighbourhood"
Weapons found in a mosque during Operation Cast Lead, according to the IDF
IDF forces discover weapons in a mosque during Operation Cast Lead in the Gaza Strip
White phosphorus artillery shell exploding over Gaza City on the 11 January
Palestinians in a Gaza city neighbourhood on Day 18 of the War in Gaza
According to Human Rights Watch rockets from Gaza were fired from populated areas.
A Grad rocket hitting Beersheba
An example of a weapons cache found in northern Gaza
A weapons cache in found in northern Gaza
Kindergarten classroom in Beersheba hit by Grad rocket from Gaza
Repairs being made to water pipe after it was hit a by a rocket
Hamas operation centre in the middle of a civilian area
Destroyed buildings in Gaza City, January 2009
A satellite-based damage assessment of the Gaza Strip by the United Nations (UNOSAT, February 2009)
Tent camp, Gaza Strip, April 2009
Destroyed buildings in Gaza
According to HRW, during the Gaza War, rocket attacks placed up to 800,000 people within range of attack.
Photojournalists during the conflict
Protest against the war in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Protest against the war in London, UK
Governmental proclamations regarding the 2008–2009 Israel–Gaza conflict
Tel-Aviv University students demonstrating in support for operation "Cast Lead" and the citizens of south Israel

Hamas rejected the demands, calling the conditions unfair and endangering the well-being of Palestinians, leading to Quartet suspension of its foreign assistance program and to Israel imposing economic sanctions.

Herzl in 1897

Theodor Herzl

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Austro-Hungarian Jewish lawyer, journalist, playwright, political activist, and writer who was the father of modern political Zionism.

Austro-Hungarian Jewish lawyer, journalist, playwright, political activist, and writer who was the father of modern political Zionism.

Herzl in 1897
A plaque marking the birthplace of Theodor Herzl, Dohány Street Synagogue, Budapest.
Herzl and his family, c. 1866–1873
Herzl as a child with his mother Janet and sister Pauline
Herzl (seated in the middle) with members of the Zionist Organization in Vienna, 1896
Theodor Herzl in Basel, 1897
Herzl on board a vessel reaching the shores of Palestine, 1898
Theodor Herzl (center) with a Zionist delegation in Jerusalem, 1898. From right to left: Joseph Seidener, Moses T. Schnirer, Theodor Herzl, David Wolffsohn, Max Bodenheimer
Theodor Herzl at the Second Zionist Congress in Basel, 1898
Herzl's last photograph (1904)
David Ben-Gurion declaring the establishment of the State of Israel, in Tel Aviv, May 14, 1948, beneath a large portrait of Theodor Herzl
Julie Naschauer
Herzl and his children in 1900
Herzl and his children on a trip in 1900
Portrait of Herzl
Title page of Der Judenstaat (1896)
Title page of Altneuland (1902)
Stephen Norman garden marker at Mount Herzl in Jerusalem

Although he died before Israel's establishment, he is known in Hebrew as חוֹזֵה הַמְדִינָה,,.

Abbas in 2021

Mahmoud Abbas

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President of the State of Palestine and the Palestinian National Authority.

President of the State of Palestine and the Palestinian National Authority.

Abbas in 2021
Abbas with President of the United States George W. Bush and Prime Minister of Israel Ariel Sharon at the Red Sea Summit in Aqaba, Jordan, 4 June 2003
Abbas with Ariel Sharon and George W. Bush in Aqaba, Jordan, 4 June 2003
Abbas with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, 18 January 2011
Abbas with U.S. President Donald Trump in Washington, D.C., 3 May 2017
Abbas with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden in the Oval Office
Abbas meets with then United States Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and then Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert.
Abbas meets with then US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Abbas, Vladimir Putin, and Recep Tayyip Erdoğan opened Moscow's Cathedral Mosque, 23 September 2015.

Mahmoud Abbas was born on 15 November 1935 in Safed, in the Galilee region of Mandatory Palestine (now Israel).