Israeli Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independenceestablishment of the State of IsraelIsrael's declaration of independenceindependenceIsraeli independenceDeclaration of the Establishment of the State of Israelestablishmentestablishment of IsraeldeclaredIsrael's independence
The Israeli Declaration of Independence, formally the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel, was proclaimed on 14 May 1948 (5 Iyar 5708) by David Ben-Gurion, the Executive Head of the World Zionist Organization, Chairman of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, and soon to be first Prime Minister of Israel.wikipedia
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David Ben-Gurion

Ben-GurionDavid Ben GurionBen Gurion
The Israeli Declaration of Independence, formally the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel, was proclaimed on 14 May 1948 (5 Iyar 5708) by David Ben-Gurion, the Executive Head of the World Zionist Organization, Chairman of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, and soon to be first Prime Minister of Israel.
On 14 May 1948, he formally proclaimed the establishment of the State of Israel, and was the first to sign the Israeli Declaration of Independence, which he had helped to write.

List of prime ministers of Israel

Prime MinisterPrime Minister of Israelcomplete list
The Israeli Declaration of Independence, formally the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel, was proclaimed on 14 May 1948 (5 Iyar 5708) by David Ben-Gurion, the Executive Head of the World Zionist Organization, Chairman of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, and soon to be first Prime Minister of Israel.
This article lists the prime ministers of Israel since the adoption of the Israeli Declaration of Independence in 1948.

Israel

State of IsraelIsraeliISR
It declared the establishment of a Jewish state in Eretz-Israel, to be known as the State of Israel, which would come into effect on termination of the British Mandate at midnight that day.
Upon independence in 1948, the country formally adopted the name "State of Israel" after other proposed historical and religious names including Eretz Israel ("the Land of Israel"), Zion, and Judea, were considered but rejected.

Mandate for Palestine

British MandateBritish Mandate authoritiesBritish Mandate of Palestine
It declared the establishment of a Jewish state in Eretz-Israel, to be known as the State of Israel, which would come into effect on termination of the British Mandate at midnight that day.
On the last day of the Mandate, the creation of the State of Israel was proclaimed and the 1948 Arab–Israeli War began.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
The possibility of a Jewish homeland in Palestine had been a goal of Zionist organizations since the late 19th century.
It defines itself as a Jewish and democratic state in the Basic Laws, Human Dignity and Liberty in particular, which is based on the Declaration of Independence.

Iyar

Iyyar5 IyarIjjar
The Israeli Declaration of Independence, formally the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel, was proclaimed on 14 May 1948 (5 Iyar 5708) by David Ben-Gurion, the Executive Head of the World Zionist Organization, Chairman of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, and soon to be first Prime Minister of Israel.

Prime Minister of Israel

Prime MinisterIsraeli Prime MinisterPrime Ministers
The Israeli Declaration of Independence, formally the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel, was proclaimed on 14 May 1948 (5 Iyar 5708) by David Ben-Gurion, the Executive Head of the World Zionist Organization, Chairman of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, and soon to be first Prime Minister of Israel.
The office of Prime Minister came into existence on 14 May 1948, the date of the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel, when the provisional government was created.

Jewish state

Hebrew statehomeland for the Jewish peopleIsraeli state
It declared the establishment of a Jewish state in Eretz-Israel, to be known as the State of Israel, which would come into effect on termination of the British Mandate at midnight that day.
The concept was adopted in the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel on 14 May 1948 as the objective of the establishment of modern Israel.

Zionism

ZionistZionistsZionist movement
The possibility of a Jewish homeland in Palestine had been a goal of Zionist organizations since the late 19th century.
Major aspects of the Zionist idea are represented in the Israeli Declaration of Independence:

World Zionist Organization

Zionist OrganizationZionist OrganisationWorld Zionist Organisation
The Israeli Declaration of Independence, formally the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel, was proclaimed on 14 May 1948 (5 Iyar 5708) by David Ben-Gurion, the Executive Head of the World Zionist Organization, Chairman of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, and soon to be first Prime Minister of Israel. Chaim Weizmann, the Chairman of the World Zionist Organization, and soon to be first President of Israel, endorsed the decision, after reportedly asking "What are they waiting for, the idiots?"
When the State of Israel was declared 51 years later on May 14, 1948, many of its new administrative institutions were already in place, having evolved during the regular Zionist Congresses of the previous decades.

David Remez

DavidRemez
A revised second draft was made by three lawyers, A. Beham, A. Hintzheimer and Z.E. Baker, and was framed by a committee including David Remez, Pinchas Rosen, Haim-Moshe Shapira, Moshe Sharett and Aharon Zisling.
David Remez (, born David Drabkin in 1886, died 19 May 1951) was an Israeli politician, the country's first Minister of Transportation, and a signatory of the Israeli declaration of independence.

Aharon Zisling

Aharon Tzizling
A revised second draft was made by three lawyers, A. Beham, A. Hintzheimer and Z.E. Baker, and was framed by a committee including David Remez, Pinchas Rosen, Haim-Moshe Shapira, Moshe Sharett and Aharon Zisling.
Aharon Zisling (אהרון ציזלינג, 26 February 1901 – 16 January 1964) was an Israeli politician and minister and a signatory of Israel's declaration of independence.

List of presidents of Israel

complete listfirstfourth president
Chaim Weizmann, the Chairman of the World Zionist Organization, and soon to be first President of Israel, endorsed the decision, after reportedly asking "What are they waiting for, the idiots?"
This article lists the Chairmen of the Provisional State Council and Presidents of Israel since the adoption of the Israeli Declaration of Independence in 1948.

League of Nations mandate

mandatemandatesmandate territory
After World War I, the United Kingdom was given a mandate for Palestine, which it had conquered from the Ottomans during the war.

Yitzhak-Meir Levin

Yitzhak Meir Levin
Three of the thirteen members were missing, with Yehuda Leib Maimon and Yitzhak Gruenbaum being blocked in besieged Jerusalem, while Yitzhak-Meir Levin was in the United States.
One of 37 people to sign the Israeli declaration of independence, he served in several Israeli cabinets, and was a longtime leader and Knesset minister for Agudat Yisrael and related parties.

Peretz Bernstein

Several other signatories later Hebraised their names, including Meir Argov (Grabovsky), Peretz Bernstein (then Fritz Bernstein), Avraham Granot (Granovsky), Avraham Nissan (Katznelson), Moshe Kol (Kolodny), Yehuda Leib Maimon (Fishman), Golda Meir (Meyerson/Myerson), Pinchas Rosen (Felix Rosenblueth) and Moshe Sharett (Shertok).
Peretz Bernstein (, born Shlomo Fritz Bernstein; 12 June 1890 – 21 March 1971) was a Zionist activist and Israeli politician and one of the signatories of the Israeli declaration of independence.

Zvi Berenson

The first draft of the declaration was made by Zvi Berenson, the legal advisor of the Histadrut trade union and later a Justice of the Supreme Court, at the request of Pinchas Rosen.
He was one of the writers of the Israeli Declaration of Independence in 1948.

Mordechai Bentov

Mordechai
Mordechai Bentov (, born Mordechai Gutgeld on 28 March 1900, died 18 January 1985) was an Israeli journalist and politician, and was one of the signatories of the Israeli declaration of independence.

Bechor-Shalom Sheetrit

Bechor ShitritBechor Sheetrit
While this was supported by Rosen and Bechor-Shalom Sheetrit, it was opposed by Ben-Gurion and Zisling, with Ben-Gurion stating, "We accepted the UN Resolution, but the Arabs did not. They are preparing to make war on us. If we defeat them and capture western Galilee or territory on both sides of the road to Jerusalem, these areas will become part of the state. Why should we obligate ourselves to accept boundaries that in any case the Arabs don't accept?"
Bechor-Shalom Sheetrit (, 1895 – 28 January 1967) was an Israeli politician, minister and the only signatory of the Israeli declaration of independence to have been born in the country.

Eliezer Kaplan

Eliezer Kaplan (אליעזר קפלן; Эліэзер Каплан; 27 January 1891 – 13 July 1952 ) was a Zionist activist, Israeli politician, one of the signatories of the Israeli declaration of independence and the country's first Minister of Finance and Deputy Prime Minister.

Tel Aviv

Tel-AvivTel Aviv, IsraelTel Aviv-Yafo
The draft text was submitted for approval to a meeting of Moetzet HaAm (מועצת העם, lit. People's Council) at the JNF building in Tel Aviv on 14 May.
Tel Aviv and Jaffa were later merged into a single municipality in 1950, two years after the Israeli Declaration of Independence, which was proclaimed in the city.

Moshe Sharett

Moshe ShertokMoshe SharetShertok
A revised second draft was made by three lawyers, A. Beham, A. Hintzheimer and Z.E. Baker, and was framed by a committee including David Remez, Pinchas Rosen, Haim-Moshe Shapira, Moshe Sharett and Aharon Zisling. Several other signatories later Hebraised their names, including Meir Argov (Grabovsky), Peretz Bernstein (then Fritz Bernstein), Avraham Granot (Granovsky), Avraham Nissan (Katznelson), Moshe Kol (Kolodny), Yehuda Leib Maimon (Fishman), Golda Meir (Meyerson/Myerson), Pinchas Rosen (Felix Rosenblueth) and Moshe Sharett (Shertok).
Sharett was one of the signatories of Israel's Declaration of Independence.

Sephardim and Oriental Communities

Histadrut HaSephardimHaSephardimNational Union
The Sephardim and Oriental Communities party represented Sephardi Jews and Mizrahi Jews who were already living in Israel at the time of independence, and was part of Minhelet HaAm and the Provisional government in 1948–49.

Revisionist Zionism

Revisionist ZionistRevisionistRevisionists
The Revisionists, committed to a Jewish state on both sides of the Jordan River (that is, including Transjordan), wanted the phrase "within its historic borders" included, but were unsuccessful.
During the first two decades after the declaration of independence of the State of Israel in May 1948, the main revisionist party, Herut (founded in June 1948), remained in opposition.

Pinchas Rosen

Felix RosenblüthPinhas RosenRosen
A revised second draft was made by three lawyers, A. Beham, A. Hintzheimer and Z.E. Baker, and was framed by a committee including David Remez, Pinchas Rosen, Haim-Moshe Shapira, Moshe Sharett and Aharon Zisling. Several other signatories later Hebraised their names, including Meir Argov (Grabovsky), Peretz Bernstein (then Fritz Bernstein), Avraham Granot (Granovsky), Avraham Nissan (Katznelson), Moshe Kol (Kolodny), Yehuda Leib Maimon (Fishman), Golda Meir (Meyerson/Myerson), Pinchas Rosen (Felix Rosenblueth) and Moshe Sharett (Shertok). The first draft of the declaration was made by Zvi Berenson, the legal advisor of the Histadrut trade union and later a Justice of the Supreme Court, at the request of Pinchas Rosen.
In 1948 he was among the signatories of the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel, which he helped create.