Italian Americans

ItalianItalian-AmericanItaliansItalian AmericanItalian immigrantsItalian ancestryItalian immigrantItalian-AmericansItalyAmerican
Italian Americans (italoamericani or italo-americani ) are an ethnic group consisting of Americans who have ancestry from Italy.wikipedia
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English Americans

EnglishAnglo-AmericanAnglo-Americans
Italian Americans are the fourth largest ethnic group of European Americans behind German Americans, Irish Americans and English Americans.
Since 1776, English-Americans have been less likely to proclaim their heritage in the face of the upsurge of cultural and ethnic pride by African Americans, Irish Americans, Scottish Americans, Italian Americans or other ethnic groups.

Luigi Palma di Cesnola

General di Cesnoladi CesnolaLuigi de Palma Cesnola
The Garibaldi Guard recruited volunteers for the Union Army from Italy and other European countries to form the 39th New York Infantry Six Italian Americans received the Medal of Honor during the war, among whom was Colonel Luigi Palma di Cesnola, who later became the first Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Arts in New York (1879-1904).
Luigi Palma di Cesnola (July 29, 1832 – November 20, 1904), an Italian-American soldier, diplomat and amateur archaeologist, was born in Rivarolo Canavese, near Turin.

Sabato Morais

In 1886, Rabbi Sabato Morais, a Jewish Italian immigrant, was one of the founders and first president of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in New York.
Sabato Morais (April 13, 1823 – November 11, 1897) was an Italian-American rabbi, leader of Mikveh Israel Synagogue, pioneer of Italian Jewish Studies in America, and founder of the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York City.

Ralph DePalma

Ralph de PalmaDe Palma, RalphRalph
Ralph DePalma won the Indianapolis 500 in 1915.
Raffaele "Ralph" De Palma (December 18, 1882 – March 31, 1956) was an Italian-American racecar driving champion who won the 1915 Indianapolis 500.

Giuseppe Mario Bellanca

Giuseppe BellancaBellancaGiuseppe Bellanco
Another Italian immigrant, Giuseppe Bellanca, brought with him in 1912 an advanced aircraft design, which he began producing.
Giuseppe Mario Bellanca (March 19, 1886 – December 26, 1960) was an Italian-American airplane designer and builder who created the first enclosed-cabin monoplane in the United States in 1922.

Frank Sinatra

SinatraFrankFrankie
Popular singers of the period included Russ Columbo, who established a new singing style that influenced Frank Sinatra and other singers that followed. Scores of Italian Americans became well known singers in the post-war period, including: Frank Sinatra, Mario Lanza, Perry Como, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Frankie Laine, Bobby Darin, Julius La Rosa, and Connie Francis.
Born in Hoboken, New Jersey, to Italian Americans, Sinatra began his musical career in the swing era with bandleaders Harry James and Tommy Dorsey.

Vito Marcantonio

On the far left Vito Marcantonio was first elected to Congress in 1934 from New York.
Vito Anthony Marcantonio (December 10, 1902 – August 9, 1954) was an Italian-American lawyer and leftist politician.

Mulberry Street (Manhattan)

Mulberry StreetMulberryMulberry St.
The New York Times in May 1896 sent its reporters to characterize the Little Italy/Mulberry neighborhood:
It is historically associated with Italian-American culture and history, and in the late 19th and early 20th centuries was the heart of Manhattan's Little Italy.

Salvatore A. Cotillo

Salvatore A. Cotillo was the first Italian-American to serve in both houses of the New York State Legislature and the first who served as Justice of the New York State Supreme Court.
Elected in 1912, he was the first Italian-American to serve in both houses of the New York State Legislature and the first who served as Justice of the New York State Supreme Court.

Frank Capra

Capra-esqueCapraesqueCapra
The film industry of this era included Frank Capra, who received three Academy Awards for directing.
Frank Russell Capra (born Francesco Rosario Capra; May 18, 1897 – September 3, 1991) was an Italian American film director, producer and writer who became the creative force behind some of the major award-winning films of the 1930s and 1940s.

Joseph Cataldo

Father Joseph CataldoFather Joseph Cataldo, SJGiuseppe Cataldo
The Jesuit Giuseppe Cataldo, founded Gonzaga College (now Gonzaga University) in Spokane, Washington in 1887.
Joseph Mary Cataldo S.J. (March 17, 1837 – April 9, 1928) was an Italian-American Jesuit priest, a pioneer missionary in the inland Pacific Northwest, who also founded Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington.

Joseph James Ettor

Joe EttorEttorSmiling Joe" Ettor
Numerous Italian Americans were at the forefront in fighting for worker's rights in industries such as the mining, textiles and garment industries, the most notable among these being Arturo Giovannitti, Carlo Tresca and Joseph Ettor.
Joseph James "Smiling Joe" Ettor (1885–1948) was an Italian-American trade union organizer who, in the middle-1910s, was one of the leading public faces of the Industrial Workers of the World.

Joe DiMaggio

JoeDiMaggiohis father
Joe DiMaggio, who was destined to become one of the most famous players in baseball history, began playing for the New York Yankees in 1936.
Born to Italian immigrants in California, he is widely considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time, and is perhaps best known for his 56-game hitting streak (May 15 – July 16, 1941), a record that still stands.

Pietro Cesare Alberti

Peter Caesar Alberti
The first Italian to reside in America was Pietro Cesare Alberti, a Venetian seaman who, in 1635, settled in what would eventually become New York City.
Pietro Cesare Alberti (1608–1655) — later Peter Caesar Alburtus — was a Venetian immigrant to the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam, commonly regarded as the first Italian American settler in what is now New York State.

Arturo Giovannitti

Giovannitti
Numerous Italian Americans were at the forefront in fighting for worker's rights in industries such as the mining, textiles and garment industries, the most notable among these being Arturo Giovannitti, Carlo Tresca and Joseph Ettor.
Arturo M. Giovannitti (Ripabottoni 1884 - New York City 1959) was an Italian-American union leader, socialist political activist, and poet.

Joseph Barbera

BarberaJoe Barbera
Italian American cartoonists were responsible for some of the most popular animated characters: Donald Duck was created by Al Taliaferro, Woody Woodpecker was a creation of Walter Lantz (Lanza), Casper the Friendly Ghost was co-created by Joseph Oriolo, and Tom and Jerry was co-created by Joseph Barbera.
He was born to Italian immigrants in New York City, where he lived, attended college, and began his career through his young adult years.

Simon Rodia

Sabato "Simon" RodiaSabato ("Simon") RodiaSam (Simon) Rodia
Simon Rodia, an immigrant construction worker, built the Watts Towers over a period of 33 years, from 1921 to 1954.
Sabato "Simon" Rodia (February 12, 1879 – July 17, 1965) was an Italian-American artist who created the Watts Towers, or, as he called them, Nuestro Pueblo (Our Town, in Spanish), a Los Angeles landmark.

Frankie Laine

LaineCall of the Wild'' (Frankie Laine album)Frankie Laines
Scores of Italian Americans became well known singers in the post-war period, including: Frank Sinatra, Mario Lanza, Perry Como, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Frankie Laine, Bobby Darin, Julius La Rosa, and Connie Francis.

Connie Francis

TeddyValentino
Scores of Italian Americans became well known singers in the post-war period, including: Frank Sinatra, Mario Lanza, Perry Como, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Frankie Laine, Bobby Darin, Julius La Rosa, and Connie Francis.
Francis was born to an Italian-American family in the Italian Down Neck, or Ironbound, neighborhood of Newark, New Jersey, the first child of George Franconero, Sr., and Ida Franconero (née Ferrari-di Vito), spending her first years in a Brooklyn neighborhood on Utica Avenue/St.

Tony Bennett

BennettBenedetto, AnthonyBennet
Scores of Italian Americans became well known singers in the post-war period, including: Frank Sinatra, Mario Lanza, Perry Como, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Frankie Laine, Bobby Darin, Julius La Rosa, and Connie Francis.
Born and raised in Astoria to an Italian-American family, Bennett began singing at an early age.

Gian Carlo Menotti

MenottiGian-Carlo Menotti Gian Carlo Menotti
Classical and operatic composers John Corigliano, Norman Dello Joio, David Del Tredici, Paul Creston, Dominick Argento, and Gian Carlo Menotti were honored with Pulitzer Prizes and Grammy Awards.
Gian Carlo Menotti (July 7, 1911 – February 1, 2007) was an Italian-American composer and librettist.

Paul Creston

CrestonCreston, Paul
Classical and operatic composers John Corigliano, Norman Dello Joio, David Del Tredici, Paul Creston, Dominick Argento, and Gian Carlo Menotti were honored with Pulitzer Prizes and Grammy Awards.
Paul Creston (born Giuseppe Guttoveggio; October 10, 1906 – August 24, 1985) was an Italian American composer of classical music.

Al D'Amato

Alfonse D'AmatoAlfonse M. D'AmatoAlphonse D'Amato
Those that became U.S. senators included: John Pastore of Rhode Island, who was the first Italian American elected to the Senate in 1950; Pete Domenici, who was elected to the U.S. Senate from New Mexico in 1973, and served six terms; Patrick Leahy who was elected to the U.S. Senate from Vermont in 1973, and has served continuously since then; and Alfonse D'Amato, who served as U.S. Senator from New York from 1981 to 1999.
D'Amato, of Italian ancestry, was born in Brooklyn and raised on Long Island, in the small village of Island Park.

Arizona

AZArizona, U.S.State of Arizona
In 1539, Marco da Nizza, explored the territory that later became the states of Arizona and New Mexico.
5) Italian (4.6%).

Renato Dulbecco

DulbeccoDulbecco, Renato
Seven Italian Americans became Nobel Prize laureates in the post-war decades: Mario Capecchi, Renato Dulbecco, Riccardo Giacconi, Salvatore Luria, Franco Modigliani, Rita Levi Montalcini and Emilio G. Segrè.
Renato Dulbecco (February 22, 1914 – February 19, 2012) was an Italian American, who won the 1975 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work on oncoviruses, which are viruses that can cause cancer when they infect animal cells.