A report on Italian Americans and Vermont

Landing of Cristopher Columbus (12 October 1492), painting by John Vanderlyn
Amerigo Vespucci, Italian explorer from whose name the term "America" is derived
The Old Constitution House at Windsor, where the Constitution of Vermont was adopted on July 8, 1777
Verrazzano's voyage of 1524. The Italian explorer was the first documented European to enter New York Harbor and the Hudson River.
A circa 1775 flag used by the Green Mountain Boys
Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge in New York City is named for Giovanni da Verrazzano.
The gold leaf dome of the neoclassical Vermont State House (Capitol) in Montpelier
Philip Mazzei, Italian physician and promoter of liberty, whose phrase: "All men are by nature equally free and independent" was incorporated into the United States Declaration of Independence
1791 Act of Congress admitting Vermont into the Union
Statue of Francis Vigo
Vermont in 1827. The county boundaries have since changed.
Review of the Garibaldi Guard by President Abraham Lincoln
Map of Vermont showing cities, roads, and rivers
The Garibaldi-Meucci Museum on Staten Island
Population density of Vermont
The "Bambinos" of Little Italy - Syracuse, New York in 1899
Mount Mansfield
Mulberry Street, along which New York City's Little Italy is centered. Lower East Side, circa 1900.
Western face of Camel's Hump Mountain (elevation 4079 ft).
Italian immigrants entering the United States via Ellis Island in 1905
Fall foliage at Lake Willoughby
The Monongah mining disaster of 1907 described as "the worst mining disaster in American history" the official death toll stood at 362, 171 of them Italian migrants.
Köppen climate types of Vermont, using 1991–2020 climate normals.
Little Italy in Chicago, 1909
Silurian and Devonian stratigraphy of Vermont
Italian-Hawaiian woman with a poi bowl, 1909
The hermit thrush, the state bird of Vermont
Joe Petrosino in 1909
A proportional representation of Vermont exports, 2020
Michael Valente, recipient of the highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions during World War I
Fall foliage seen from Hogback Mountain, Wilmington
Fiorello La Guardia with Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1938
Lake Champlain
Italian American WPA workers doing roadwork in Dorchester, Boston, 1930s
Autumn in Vermont
Rudolph Valentino with Alice Terry in The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, 1921
Stowe Resort Village
Historical advertisement of an Italian American restaurant, between circa 1930 and 1945
The Lyndon Institute, a high school in Lyndon, Vermont
Italian-American veterans of all wars memorial, Southbridge, Massachusetts
The University of Vermont
Old Mill, the oldest building of the university
Frank Capra receiving the Distinguished Service Medal from General George C. Marshall, 1945
Vermont welcome sign in Addison on Route 17 just over the New York border over the Champlain Bridge
Enrico Fermi, architect of the nuclear age, was awarded the 1938 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on induced radioactivity.
Amtrak station in White River Junction
Dominic Salvatore Don Gentile on the wing of his P-51B, 'Shangri-La'. Also known as "Ace of Aces", he was a World War II USAAF pilot who surpassed Eddie Rickenbacker's World War I record of 26 downed aircraft.
The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant, in Vernon
Joe DiMaggio, considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time, in 1951
The Vermont Supreme Court's building in Montpelier
Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin in 1963
Vermont towns hold a March town meeting for voters to approve the town's budget and decide other matters. Marlboro voters meet in this building.
Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola, filmmakers whose body of work explores themes such as Italian-American identity, here together with Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, are among the greatest modern directors.
Senators Bernie Sanders and Patrick Leahy and Representative Peter Welch greet supporters in 2017.
Wally Schirra, one of the earliest NASA astronauts to enter into space (1962), taking part in the Mercury Seven program and later Gemini and Apollo programs
Vermontasaurus sculpture in Post Mills, in 2010
Columbus Day in Salem, Massachusetts in 1892
1973 U.S. postage stamp featuring Amadeo Giannini
Enrico Fermi between Franco Rasetti (left) and Emilio Segrè in academic dress
A fourteen year old Italian girl working at a paper-box factory (1913)
The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911. The victims were almost exclusively Jewish and Italian female immigrants.
Mother Cabrini
An Italian immigrant making an American breakfast aided by instructional materials from the YMCA
Lawrence Ferlinghetti
Don DeLillo
Paola Corso
Danielle Trussoni
St. Anthony of Padua Church in New York was established in 1859 as the first parish in the United States formed specifically to serve the Italian immigrant community.
Our Lady of Pompeii Church in New York was founded in 1892 as a national parish to serve Italian-American immigrants who settled in Greenwich Village.
Emilio Segrè, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1959, was among the Italian Jews who emigrated to the United States after Mussolini's regime implemented an anti-semitic legislation.
Italian Cultural and Community Center (Logue House) in the Houston Museum District
A war-time poster
Feast of San Gennaro in New York
President Barack Obama participates in an interview with Jay Leno during a taping of "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" at the NBC Studios in Burbank, Calif., Oct. 24, 2012.
Italian American Museum of Los Angeles
Sacco and Vanzetti in handcuffs
One of the largest mass lynchings in American history involved eleven Italian immigrants in New Orleans in 1891.
Top ancestry by U.S. county. Dark blue indicates counties where persons of Italian ancestry form a plurality.
Little Italy in Manhattan after Italy won the 2006 FIFA World Cup
Much of Philadelphia's Italian population is in South Philadelphia, and is well known for its Italian Market.
The American and Italian flags in Boston's North End
St. Lucy's Church in Newark
Northside in Syracuse
Feast of the Assumption in Cleveland's Little Italy
Gateway to Ybor City on 7th. Ave near the Nick Nuccio Parkway
Sts. Peter and Paul Church in North Beach, San Francisco

Italian Americans (italoamericani or italo-americani, ) are Americans who have full or partial Italian ancestry.

- Italian Americans

Beginning in the mid-19th century, Vermont industries attracted numerous Irish, Scots-Irish and Italian immigrants, adding to its residents of mostly English and some French-Canadian ancestry.

- Vermont

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Massachusetts

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Most populous state in the New England region of the United States.

Most populous state in the New England region of the United States.

The Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor by William Halsall (1882). The Pilgrims founded Plymouth in 1620.
An illustration of the Battles of Lexington and Concord
John Adams, 2nd President of the United States (1797–1801)
Textile mills such as the one in Lowell made Massachusetts a leader in the Industrial Revolution.
John F. Kennedy, Massachusetts native and 35th President of the United States (1961–1963)
Boston Marathon bombing
A portion of the north-central Pioneer Valley in South Deerfield
Köppen climate types in Massachusetts
Massachusetts population density map. The centers of high-density settlement, from east to west, are Boston, Worcester, Springfield, and Pittsfield, respectively.
Saint Patrick's Day parade in Scituate, the municipality with the highest percentage identifying Irish ancestry in the United States, at 47.5% in 2010. Irish Americans constitute the largest ethnicity in Massachusetts.
Boston's Chinatown, with its paifang gate, is home to many Chinese and also Vietnamese restaurants.
Boston gay pride march, held annually in June. In 2004 Massachusetts became the first U.S. state to legalize same-sex marriage.
Built in 1681, the Old Ship Church in Hingham is the oldest church in America in continuous ecclesiastical use. Massachusetts has since become one of the most irreligious states in the U.S.
Towns in Massachusetts by combined mean SAT of their public high school district for the 2015–2016 academic year
Sunset at Brewster, on Cape Cod Bay.
The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, serving Greater Boston
Logan International Airport in Boston is the largest airport in New England in terms of passenger volume
Prominent roads and cities in Massachusetts
The Massachusetts State House, topped by its golden dome, faces Boston Common on Beacon Hill.
Charlie Baker (R), the 72nd Governor of Massachusetts
Boston Pride Parade, 2012. From left: Representative Joe Kennedy III, Senator Elizabeth Warren, and former representative Barney Frank.
The site of Henry David Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond in Concord
Massachusetts has the largest population of the New England states. New Englander culture and identity remains strong in Massachusetts (Flag of New England pictured above).
An outdoor dance performance at Jacob's Pillow in Becket
USS Constitution fires a salute during its annual Fourth of July turnaround cruise
Map showing the average medicare reimbursement per enrollee for the counties in Massachusetts.
Gillette Stadium in Foxborough is the home venue for the New England Patriots (NFL) and the New England Revolution (MLS)
Koppen climate of Massachusetts
A 1779 five-shilling note issued by Massachusetts.
Koppen climate of Massachusetts

It borders on the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Maine to the east, Connecticut and Rhode Island to the south, New Hampshire and Vermont to the north and New York to the west.

Italians form the second-largest ethnic group in the state (13.5%), but form a plurality in some suburbs north of Boston and in a few towns in the Berkshires.

English Americans

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English Americans, or Anglo-Americans, are Americans whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England.

English Americans, or Anglo-Americans, are Americans whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England.

England United States. Shows the first permanent English settlement of Jamestown in 1607.
Statue of John Smith for the first English settlement in Historic Jamestowne, Virginia.
The first self-governing document of Plymouth Colony. English Pilgrims signing the Mayflower Compact in 1620.
John Trumbull's famous painting, Declaration of Independence.
English language distribution in the United States.
American cultural icons, apple pie, baseball, and the American flag.
The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth Colony by English Pilgrims in October 1621.
Henry Chadwick’s early contributions to the development of the game is often called the "Father of Baseball".

Since 1776, English Americans have been less likely to proclaim their heritage, unlike Latino Americans, African Americans, Italian Americans, Irish Americans, Native Americans or other ethnic groups.

The same 1909 data for each state (of the total European population only) of English ancestry were Connecticut 96.2%, Rhode Island 96.0%, Vermont 95.4%, Massachusetts 95.0%, New Hampshire 94.1%, Maine 93.1%, Virginia 85.0%, Maryland 84.0%, North Carolina 83.1%, South Carolina 82.4%, New York 78.2% and Pennsylvania 59.0%.

New York (state)

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State in the Northeastern United States.

State in the Northeastern United States.

New York was dominated by Iroquoian (purple) and Algonquian (pink) tribes.
New Amsterdam, present-day Lower Manhattan, 1660
New York and neighboring provinces, by Claude Joseph Sauthier, 1777
British general John Burgoyne surrenders at Saratoga in 1777
1800 map of New York from Low's Encyclopaedia
The Erie Canal at Lockport, New York, in 1839
Flight 175 hitting the South Tower on September11, 2001
Flooding on AvenueC in Lower Manhattan caused by Hurricane Sandy
New York is bordered by six U.S. states, two Great Lakes, and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec.
Enveloped by the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island Sound, New York City and Long Island alone are home to about eleven million residents conjointly.
Lake-effect snow is a major contributor to heavy snowfall totals in western New York, including the Tug Hill region.
Two major state parks (in green) are the Adirondack Park (north) and the Catskill Park (south).
The Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor is a symbol of the United States and its ideals.
The African Burial Ground National Monument in Lower Manhattan
Map of the counties in New York
New York population distribution map. New York's population is primarily concentrated in the Greater New York area, including New York City and Long Island.
The Stonewall Inn in the gay village of Greenwich Village, Lower Manhattan, site of the June 1969 Stonewall riots, the cradle of the modern LGBT rights movement
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The main laboratory building of the IBM Watson Research Center is located in Yorktown Heights, New York.
Times Square in Midtown Manhattan, hub of the Broadway theater district, a media center, and one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections
"I Love New York"
CMA CGM Theodore Roosevelt, the largest container ship to enter the Port of New York and New Jersey as of September7, 2017
Harris Hall of the City College of New York, a public college of the City University of New York
Butler Library at Columbia University
University of Rochester
South campus of the University at Buffalo, the flagship of the State University of New York
The New York City Subway is one of the world's busiest, serving more than five million passengers per average weekday.
Grand Central Terminal in New York City
John F. Kennedy Airport in Queens, the busiest international air passenger gateway to the United States
The New York State Capitol in Albany
New York State Court of Appeals
Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer, New York's U.S. Senators
Kathy Hochul (D), the 57th Governor of New York
Yankee Stadium in The Bronx
Koppen climate of New York

The state of New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont to the east; it has a maritime border with Rhode Island, east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Quebec to the north and Ontario to the northwest.

In the 2000 U.S. census, New York had the largest Italian American population, composing the largest self-identified ancestral group in Staten Island and Long Island, followed by Irish Americans.

New Hampshire

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State in the New England region of the United States.

State in the New England region of the United States.

The historical coat of arms of New Hampshire, from 1876
Site of first house in New Hampshire, present mansion constructed in 1750, by Gov. W. B. Wentworth, New York Public Library
Fort William and Mary in 1705
1922 map of New Hampshire published in the bulletin of the Brown Company in Berlin
Köppen climate types of New Hampshire, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Map of New Hampshire, with roads, rivers, and major cities
Shaded relief map of New Hampshire
Mount Adams (5774 ft) is part of New Hampshire's Presidential Range.
Lake Winnipesaukee and the Ossipee Mountains
Autumn leaves on many hardwood trees in New Hampshire turn colors, attracting many tourists
Downtown Manchester
Main Street, Nashua
Largest reported ancestry groups in New Hampshire by town as of 2013. Dark purple indicates Irish, light purple English, pink French, turquoise French Canadian, dark blue Italian, and light blue German. Gray indicates townships with no reported data.
Farmers' market of Mack's Apples
The New Hampshire State House in Concord
Saint Anselm College has held several national debates on campus.
Dartmouth College before a debate in 2008
Manchester–Boston Regional Airport from the air
Dartmouth College's Baker Library
Thompson Hall, at UNH, was built in 1892.

It is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, Vermont to the west, Maine and the Gulf of Maine to the east, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north.

According to the 2012–2017 American Community Survey, the largest ancestry groups in the state were Irish (20.6%), English (16.5%), French (14.0%), Italian (10.4%), German (9.1%), French Canadian (8.9%), and American (4.8%).

Notable Irish Americans

Irish Americans

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Irish Americans or Hiberno-Americans (Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are Americans who have full or partial ancestry from Ireland.

Irish Americans or Hiberno-Americans (Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are Americans who have full or partial ancestry from Ireland.

Notable Irish Americans
Charles Carroll, the sole Catholic signer of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, was the descendant of Irish nobility in County Tipperary. Signers Matthew Thornton, George Taylor were born in Ireland and were "Ulster" Scots, while Thomas Lynch Jr., for example, was Protestant; he was of Irish ancestry and retained a strong Irish identity.
"Leacht Cuimhneacháin na nGael", Irish famine memorial located on Penn's Landing, Philadelphia
Thomas Ambrose Butler, an Irish Catholic priest, was a leading voice in urging Irish immigrants to colonize Kansas
Gravestone in Boston Catholic cemetery erected in memory of County Roscommon native born shortly before the Great Famine
Population density of people born in Ireland, 1870; these were mostly Catholics; the older Scots Irish immigration is not shown.
U.S. President Grover Cleveland twisting the tail of the British Lion as Americans cheer in the Venezuelan crisis of 1895; cartoon in Puck by J.S. Pughe
American political cartoon by Thomas Nast titled "The Usual Irish Way of Doing Things", depicting a drunken Irishman lighting a powder keg and swinging a bottle. Published 2 September 1871 in Harper's Weekly
The Orange riot of 1871 as depicted in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. The view is at 25th Street in Manhattan looking south down Eighth Avenue.
St. Augustine's Church on fire. Anti-Irish, anti-Catholic Nativist riots in Philadelphia in 1844.
The mass hanging of Irish Catholic soldiers who joined the Mexican army
Officers and men of the Irish-Catholic 69th New York Volunteer Regiment attend church services at Fort Corcoran in 1861.
Irish Lass depiction in 1885.
Irish immigrants in Kansas City, Missouri, c. 1909
1862 song (Female versian)
1862 song that used the "No Irish Need Apply" slogan. It was copied from a similar London song.
New York Times want ad 1854—the only New York Times ad with NINA for men.
1882 illustration from Puck depicting Irish immigrants as troublemakers, as compared to those of other nationalities
St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York
Logo of the Boston Celtics basketball team
The Philadelphia Phillies started the tradition of wearing green uniforms on St. Patrick's day.
Two Irish stars: "Gentleman Jim" Corbett licks John L. Sullivan in 1892
Actor Tom Cruise descends from paternal Irish ("Cruise" and "O'Mara") lineage around County Dublin.
Irish Republican mural in South Boston, Massachusetts
The Chicago River, dyed green for the 2005 St. Patrick's Day celebration
1928 Democratic Presidential Nominee Al Smith was the first Irish Catholic nominee of a major political party.
Distribution of Irish Americans according to the 2000 Census
President John F. Kennedy in motorcade in Cork on June 27, 1963
President Ronald Reagan speaking to a large crowd in his ancestral home in Ballyporeen, Ireland, in 1984.
President Barack Obama greets local residents on Main Street in Moneygall, Ireland, May 23, 2011.

However, due to continued immigration from Germany, and beginning in the 1880s, waves of immigration from Italy, Poland, and Canada (by French Canadians) as well as from Mexico from 1900 to 1920, Irish Catholics never accounted for a majority of the Catholic population in the United States through 1920.

Regionally, the most Irish American states are Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, Rhode Island, Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut, according to the U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey in 2013.