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A Showman's wagon, used for accommodation and transportation
Sinti Romanies in the Rhineland, 1935
Two Jenische in Muotathal, Switzerland, ca. 1890

Scottish Travellers, or the people in Scotland loosely termed Romani persons or travellers, consist of a number of diverse, unrelated communities that speak a variety of different languages and dialects that pertain to distinct customs, histories, and traditions.

- Scottish Romani and Itinerant people groups

Scottish Lowland Travellers in Lowland Scotland.

- Itinerant groups in Europe

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Irish Travellers

Irish Travellers (na lucht siúil, meaning "the walking people"), also known as Pavees or Mincéirs (Shelta: Mincéirí), are a traditionally peripatetic ethno-cultural group originating in Ireland.

Travellers near the Four Masters monument in Donegal Town, 1958
Irish Travellers in 1946
The Traveller Ethnicity pin was created to celebrate the Irish State's formal acknowledgement on 1 March 2017 of Travellers as a distinct ethnic group in Irish society.
The flag of the Irish Traveller Movement
logo for Minceirs Whiden Ireland, the all-Traveller Forum

They are one of several groups identified as "Travellers", a closely related group being the Scottish Travellers.

Romani people

Three Finnish Romani women in Helsinki, Finland, in 1930s
Gypsies camping. Welsh Romanies near Swansea, 1953
Romani girl
Two Gypsies by Francisco Iturrino
A Roma makes a complaint to a local magistrate in Hungary, by Sándor Bihari, 1886
The migration of the Romanis through the Middle East and Northern Africa to Europe
A Romani wagon pictured in 2009 in Grandborough Fields in Warwickshire. Grandborough Fields Road is a popular spot for travelling people.
First arrival of the Romanies outside Bern in the 15th century, described by the chronicler as getoufte heiden ("baptized heathens") and drawn with dark skin and wearing Saracen-style clothing and weapons
Gypsy Family in Prison, 1864 painting by Carl d´Unker. An actual imprisoned family in Germany served as the models. The reason for their imprisonment remains unknown.
An 1852 Wallachian poster advertising an auction of Romani slaves in Bucharest
Sinti and other Romani about to be deported from Germany, 22 May 1940
Münster, Sebastian (1552), "A Gipsy Family", The Cosmographia (facsimile of a woodcut), Basle
Nomadic Roma family traveling in Moldavia, 1837
Christian Romanies during the pilgrimage to Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer in France, 1980s
Two Orthodox Christian Romanies in Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Romani and bear (Belgrade, Banovo brdo, 1980s)
Members of the Cofradía de los Gitanos parading the "throne" of Mary of the O during the Holy Week in Malaga, Spain
Gypsy fortune-teller in Poland, by Antoni Kozakiewicz, 1884
Costume of a Romani woman
Muslim Romanies in Bosnia and Herzegovina (around 1900)
27 June 2009: Fanfare Ciocărlia live in Athens, Greece
Street performance during the Khamoro World Roma Festival in Prague, 2007
Deportation of Roma from Asperg, Germany, 1940 (photograph by the Rassenhygienische Forschungsstelle)
Distribution of the Romani people in Europe (2007 Council of Europe "average estimates", totalling 9.8 million)
Antiziganist protests in Sofia, 2011
Paris Bordone, The Rest on the Flight into Egypt {{circa|1530}}, Elizabeth, at right, is shown as a Romani fortune-teller
August von Pettenkofen: Gypsy Children (1885), Hermitage Museum
Vincent van Gogh: The Caravans – Gypsy Camp near Arles (1888, oil on canvas)
Carmen
Esméralda
Nicolae Grigorescu Gypsy from Boldu (1897), Art Museum of Iași

The Romani (also spelled Romany, ), colloquially known as the Roma, are an Indo-Aryan ethnic group, traditionally nomadic itinerants.

Yenish people

Yenish at Lake Lauerz, Schwyz, Switzerland, 1928
Two Yenish in Muotathal, Switzerland, ca. 1890
Geographic distribution of the Yenish (2007 upload, unreferenced)
Flag

The Yenish (German: Jenische; French: Yéniche) are an itinerant group in Western Europe who live mostly in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Belgium, and parts of France, roughly centred on the Rhineland.

Ethnic group

Ethnicity is a grouping of people who identify with each other on the basis of shared attributes that distinguish them from other groups.

A group of ethnic Bengalis in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The Bengalis form the third-largest ethnic group in the world after the Han Chinese and Arabs.
The Javanese people of Indonesia are the largest Austronesian ethnic group.
The racial diversity of Asia's ethnic groups, Nordisk familjebok (1904)
Assyrians are the indigenous peoples of Northern Iraq.
The Basque people constitute an indigenous ethnic minority in both France and Spain.
Sámi family in Lapland of Finland, 1936
The Irish are an ethnic group indigenous to Ireland of which 70–80 million people worldwide claim ancestry.

Ethno-cultural, emphasizing shared culture or tradition, often overlapping with other forms of ethnicity – example: Travellers

Sinti

The Sinti (also Sinta or Sinte; masc. sing.

Sinti people in Rhine Province, Germany 1935.
Johann Trollmann, a German Sinti boxer, 1928
Memorial in Nuremberg opposite Frauentorgraben 49, where on the 15 September 1935 the Nuremberg Laws were adopted in the ballroom of the Industrial & Cultural Association clubhouse
Deportation of Sinti and Roma in Asperg, 22 May 1940
Memorial for murdered Sinti in Düsseldorf-Lierenfeld
Ravensburg, Memorial for Sinti murdered in Auschwitz

They were traditionally itinerant, but today only a small percentage of Sinti remain unsettled.

Nomadic peoples of Europe

True nomadism has rarely been practiced in Europe in the modern period, being restricted to the margins of the continent, notably Arctic peoples such as the (traditionally) semi-nomadic Saami people in the north of Scandinavia, or the Nenets people in Russia's Nenets Autonomous Okrug.

Nenets people in Russia, 2014

Sometimes also described as "nomadic" (in the figurative or extended sense) is the itinerant lifestyle of various groups subsisting on craft or trade rather than on livestock.

Pearl

Hard, glistening object produced within the soft tissue of a living shelled mollusk or another animal, such as fossil conulariids.

Various pearls
Georgian seed pearl gold ring
A black pearl and a shell of the black-lipped pearl oyster. The iridescent colors originate from nacre layers.
Structure of nacre layers, wherein aragonite plates are separated by biopolymers, such as chitin, lustrin and silk-like proteins
Electron microscopy image of a fractured surface of nacre
Nuclei from Mikimoto Pearl Island, Toba, Japan
Pearl tiara of Empress Eugénie (1853) featuring 212 natural pearls, Louvre, Paris.
Mary, Queen of Scots wearing a rope of black pearls
A blister pearl, a half-sphere, formed flush against the shell of the pearl oyster.
A shell of the Indian volute, Melo melo, surrounded by a number of pearls from this species
Conch pearl pendant
A 14th-century piece of clothing used by Kuwaiti divers searching for pearls in the Persian Gulf
Catching of pearls, Bern Physiologus (9th century)
A pearl being extracted from an akoya pearl oyster.
Religious pendant showing Christ blessing, framed with rubies and pearls, from the Byzantine empire, 12th or 13th century
A so-called "Boule de Genève" with a matching chatelaine covered in white pearls. Amsterdam Museum
A necklace of white pearls
George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham wearing white pearls
Queen of Italy, Margherita of Savoy, owned one of the most famous collections of natural pearls. She is wearing a multi-strand choker and a rope of pearls
Pearl bracelet from the 1840s
Pearl earrings
"Pearl Trader" painting on mica in 1870 India

When it was permitted it was carried on mainly by Scottish Travellers who found pearls varied from river to river with the River Oykel in the Highlands being noted for the finest rose-pink pearls.

Kale (Welsh Roma)

The Kale (also Kalá, Valshanange; Roma yng Nghymru, Sipsiwn Cymreig, Cale) are a group of Romani people in Wales.

The Welsh Kale are extremely closely related to English Romanichal Travellers, Scottish Lowland Romany Travellers, Norwegian and Swedish Romanisæl Travellers and Finnish Kale.

Scottish Cant

Sewage-treatment-facility - The German language has many compounds

Scottish Cant (often called Scots-Romani or Scotch-Romani) is a cant spoken in Scotland by Lowland Scottish Romani Travellers/Gypsies.

Beurla Reagaird

Place names in Scotland that contain the element bal- from the Scottish Gaelic baile meaning home, farmstead, town or city. These data give some indication of the extent of medieval Gaelic settlement in Scotland.

Beurla Reagaird (previously also spelled Beurla Reagair) is a nearly extinct, Scottish Gaelic-based cant used by the indigenous travelling community of the Highlands of Scotland, formerly often referred to by the disparaging name "tinkers".