Ivan Kőszegi

IvanIvan '''KőszegiIván KőszegiJohn Kőszegi
Ivan Kőszegi (Kőszegi Iván, Yban von Güns; died 5 April 1308) was an influential lord in the Kingdom of Hungary at the turn of the 13th and 14th centuries.wikipedia
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Andrew III of Hungary

Andrew IIIAndrew the VenetianAndrew
For instance, he invited Andrew the Venetian to the throne against the reigning Ladislaus IV of Hungary three times (1278, 1287, 1290).
Andrew grew up in Venice, and first arrived in Hungary upon the invitation of a rebellious baron, Ivan Kőszegi, in 1278.

Nicholas I Kőszegi

Nicholas KőszegiNicholas INicholas
His brothers were Nicholas I, Henry II – who were also elevated into high dignities during the age of the late Árpáds – and Peter, the Bishop of Veszprém from 1275 till his murder in 1289.
His younger brothers were Ivan, Henry II – who were also elevated into high dignities during the age of the late Árpáds – and Peter, the Bishop of Veszprém from 1275 till his murder in 1289.

Henry II Kőszegi

Henry IIHenry KőszegiHenry
His brothers were Nicholas I, Henry II – who were also elevated into high dignities during the age of the late Árpáds – and Peter, the Bishop of Veszprém from 1275 till his murder in 1289.
His elder (half-)brothers were Nicholas I, Ivan – who were also elevated into high dignities during the age of the late Árpáds – and Peter, the Bishop of Veszprém from 1275 till his murder in 1289.

Nicholas Kőszegi, Bishop of Győr

NicholasNicholas of GyőrNicholas II Kőszegi
Ivan also had an illegitimate son, Nicholas, who was born in 1282 from an extramarital affair.
He was an illegitimate son of the powerful lord Ivan Kőszegi.

Peter Kőszegi

PeterPeter IPeter II Kőszegi
His brothers were Nicholas I, Henry II – who were also elevated into high dignities during the age of the late Árpáds – and Peter, the Bishop of Veszprém from 1275 till his murder in 1289.
His three brothers – Nicholas I, Ivan and the much younger Henry II – elevated into high dignities during the age of the late Árpáds.

Gregory Kőszegi

Gregory
His eldest son was Gregory, who held some minor offices before predeceased him in 1297.
Gregory was the firstborn son of the powerful lord Ivan Kőszegi.

Andrew Kőszegi

Andrew
He left two sons, Nicholas III and Andrew, who inherited Ivan's wealth and dominion in 1308.
Andrew had an elder brother Nicholas III, both of them were grandsons and heirs of the influential lord Ivan Kőszegi, who had established a province in Western Transdanubia independently of the royal power in the previous decades.

Iban von Bernstein

John the "WolfJohn the WolfJohn Kőszegi
During his advanced age, Ivan's younger son John the "Wolf" was born in the 1300s; after his downfall in Hungary, he integrated into the Austrian nobility, becoming ancestor of the Bernstein (or Pernstein) family.
John the Wolf was born into the illustrious Kőszegi family as the son of the powerful oligarch Ivan Kőszegi.

Nicholas III Kőszegi

Nicholas IIINicholas
He left two sons, Nicholas III and Andrew, who inherited Ivan's wealth and dominion in 1308.
His father was killed by a lightning strike in 1297, leaving the child Nicholas as the heir of his grandfather Ivan, who had established a province in Western Transdanubia independently of the royal power.

Kőszegi family

KőszegiKőszegisfamily
Originating from the powerful Kőszegi family, his career was characterized by series of rebellions and violations of the law against the royal power. Ivan (also John) was born in the 1240s into the wealthy and influential Kőszegi family, originating from the gens (clan) Héder, as one of the four sons of the powerful lord Henry I Kőszegi.

Kőszeg

GünsKöszegKoszeg
Several magnates and Béla's closest advisors followed her and left Hungary, including Henry Kőszegi, who handed over Kőszeg, Borostyánkő (Bernstein, Austria) and other castles along the western borders to Ottokar II.
Sometime before 1274 Henry I and his son Ivan moved the court of the Kőszegi, a breakaway branch of the family, from Güssing to Kőszeg (Güns).

Ban of Slavonia

SlavoniaBanate of SlavoniaBan
He was Palatine in 1281, between 1287 and 1288, and from 1302 until 1307, Ban of Slavonia in 1275, from 1284 until 1285 and in 1290, and Master of the treasury in 1276 and 1291.

Henry I Kőszegi

Henry KőszegiHenry IIHenricus Nemetujvari
Ivan (also John) was born in the 1240s into the wealthy and influential Kőszegi family, originating from the gens (clan) Héder, as one of the four sons of the powerful lord Henry I Kőszegi.
However, Henry never possessed the fort of Németújvár (Burg Güssing) in his lifetime; it was regained only by his son, Ivan for the Héder clan after almost a century, in the early 1280s.

Wenceslaus III of Bohemia

Wenceslaus IIIWenceslausWenceslaus of Bohemia
After the extinction of the Árpád dynasty in 1301, he betrayed the House of Anjou too and played an important role in the subsequent succession war as the partisan of Wenceslaus, then Otto.
The latter withdrew to the southern territories of Hungary after Ivan Kőszegi, who was a partisan of Wenceslaus-Ladislaus, captured Esztergom in late August 1301.

Oligarch (Kingdom of Hungary)

oligarcholigarchsoligarchic
As one of the so-called oligarchs, he established a province in Western Transdanubia, which laid in the borderlands of Hungary with Austria, and ruled Győr, Sopron, Moson, Vas and Zala counties de facto independently of the monarchs by the 1280s.

Ladislaus IV of Hungary

Ladislaus IVLadislausLadislaus IV the Cuman
For instance, he invited Andrew the Venetian to the throne against the reigning Ladislaus IV of Hungary three times (1278, 1287, 1290).
In Transdanubia, Ivan Kőszegi attempted to play off Ladislaus's father's first cousin, Andrew the Venetian, against Ladislaus.

Héder (genus)

Héder clangens'' (clan) HéderHéder
Ivan (also John) was born in the 1240s into the wealthy and influential Kőszegi family, originating from the gens (clan) Héder, as one of the four sons of the powerful lord Henry I Kőszegi.
He died sometime around 1284; there were some complaints that he unlawfully held a portion of Novák after his lord and relative, Ivan Kőszegi seized it from Conrad Győr.

Joachim Gutkeled

Joachim
In this capacity, he participated in private initiative Hungarian incursions into Austria and Moravia, Ottokar's realms in February 1273, along with Matthew Csák, Denis Péc, Joachim and Amadeus Gutkeled.
Joachim participated in private initiative Hungarian incursions into Austria and Moravia in February 1273, along with Denis Péc, Matthew Csák, Ivan Kőszegi, and his distant relative Amadeus Gutkeled.

Denis Péc

DenisDénes
In this capacity, he participated in private initiative Hungarian incursions into Austria and Moravia, Ottokar's realms in February 1273, along with Matthew Csák, Denis Péc, Joachim and Amadeus Gutkeled.
But instead, he further based his military reputation; as ispán of Oklics (present-day Konšćica-Okić, Croatia), he participated in private initiative Hungarian incursions into Austria and Moravia in February 1273, along with Matthew Csák, Ivan Kőszegi, Joachim and Amadeus Gutkeled.

Matthew II Csák

Matthew CsákMatthew IIMatthew of the Csák clan
In this capacity, he participated in private initiative Hungarian incursions into Austria and Moravia, Ottokar's realms in February 1273, along with Matthew Csák, Denis Péc, Joachim and Amadeus Gutkeled.
However, he was appointed palatine for a second term two years later, replacing Ivan Kőszegi, the late Henry the Great's son.

Peter I Csák

Peter CsákPeter IPeter
Ivan lost influence for a brief time after the Battle of Föveny in late September 1274, when Peter Csák defeated the united forces of the Kőszegis and the Gutkeleds.
Following this Ladislaus IV and Peter launched a campaign against Ivan Kőszegi, Henry's son and plundered his province.

Geregye (genus)

Geregyegens'' GeregyeGeregyes
The Kőszegis entered alliance with the Gutkeleds and the Geregyes, forming one of the two main baronial groups (the other one was dominated by the Csák and Monoszló clans).

Timothy, Bishop of Zagreb

Timothy
As a result, Timothy, Bishop of Zagreb excommunicated them in March 1281.
Taking advantage of the chaotic situation, which characterized the young Ladislaus' reign, the three brothers of the Kőszegi family, Nicholas, Ivan and Henry plundered the estates of the Diocese of Zagreb at various times in early 1281.

Charles I of Hungary

Charles ICharles RobertCharles I Robert
Ivan Kőszegi was among the group of those powerful lords, who urged Charles II of Naples to send his grandson, the 12-year-old Charles Robert, to Hungary in order to become king.
Among them, Matthew Csák dominated the northwestern parts of Hungary (which now form the western territories of present-day Slovakia), Amadeus Aba controlled the northeastern lands, Ivan Kőszegi ruled Transdanubia, and Ladislaus Kán governed Transylvania.

Conrad Győr

Conrad IConrad
The advancing Kőszegi troops gradually also displaced another local strongman Conrad Győr from the region, who had once possessed huge landholdings in Moson County.
His estate of Novák was seized by Ivan Kőszegi, a notorious lord, and unlawfully owned the property until his death.