J-pop

Japanese popPopJpopJapanese popular musicJapanese pop musicJapanesepop singerchaku-utapop musicpop star
J-pop (ジェイポップ, jeipoppu; often stylized as J-POP; an abbreviation for Japanese pop), natively also known simply as pops, is a musical genre that entered the musical mainstream of Japan in the 1990s.wikipedia
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Kayōkyoku

kayokyokukayōclassic Japanese pop and folk music
Eventually, J-pop replaced kayōkyoku ("Lyric Singing Music", a term for Japanese pop music from the 1920s to the 1980s) in the Japanese music scene.
Kayōkyoku is a Japanese pop music genre, which became a base of modern J-pop.

Yellow Magic Orchestra

YMORescue / Rydeen 79/07The City of Light / Tokyo Town Pages
J-pop was further defined by new wave groups in the late 1970s, particularly electronic synth-pop band Yellow Magic Orchestra and pop rock band Southern All Stars. After Happy End disbanded in 1973, Haruomi Hosono, a former member, began a solo career and later formed Yellow Magic Orchestra.
They are credited with playing a key role in the development of several electronic genres, including synthpop, J-pop, electro, and techno, while exploring subversive sociopolitical themes throughout their career.

Japanese rock

J-rockJapanese rock bandrock
Modern J-pop has its roots in traditional Japanese music, but significantly in 1960s pop and rock music, such as The Beatles and The Beach Boys, which led to Japanese rock bands such as Happy End fusing rock with Japanese music in the early 1970s.
Japanese rock music has received recognition worldwide, being widely known in Asia, and has survived through decades competing with its contemporary local style J-pop.

City pop

Popular styles of Japanese pop music included technopop during the 1970s–1980s, city pop in the 1980s, and Shibuya-kei in the 1990s.
It was originally termed as an offshoot of Japan's Western-influenced "new music", but came to include a wide range of styles associated with the country's nascent economic boom, such as AOR, soft rock, R&B, funk, and boogie.

Pizzicato Five

Pizzicato 5Twiggy Twiggy
At first, the term J-pop was used only for Western-style musicians in Japan, such as Pizzicato Five and Flipper's Guitar, just after Japanese radio station J-Wave was established.
Pizzicato Five (formerly typeset as Pizzicato V and sometimes abbreviated to P5) was a Japanese pop band formed in Tokyo in 1979 by multi-instrumentalists Yasuharu Konishi and Keitarō Takanami.

Japanese idol

idolidolsidol group
Ito Music City, a Japanese record store, adopted expanded classifications including Group Sounds, idol of the 1970s–1980s, enka, folk and established musicians of the 1970s–1980s, in addition to the main J-pop genres.
Most idol singers work across genres of Japanese pop music, usually in the genre that is most popular at the moment, but they also have their own subculture of music.

Enka

Enka styleEuro-enkaIwamuro Folk Song
Ito Music City, a Japanese record store, adopted expanded classifications including Group Sounds, idol of the 1970s–1980s, enka, folk and established musicians of the 1970s–1980s, in addition to the main J-pop genres.
The genre called enka is also said to be an expedient classification for record labels as well as J-pop.

J-Wave

J*Wave JapanJ-Wave FMJ-WAVE Inc.
At first, the term J-pop was used only for Western-style musicians in Japan, such as Pizzicato Five and Flipper's Guitar, just after Japanese radio station J-Wave was established.
J-WAVE coined the term "J-pop", which is only vaguely defined.

Shibuya-kei

Popular styles of Japanese pop music included technopop during the 1970s–1980s, city pop in the 1980s, and Shibuya-kei in the 1990s.
Flipper's Guitar, a duo led by Kenji Ozawa and Keigo Oyamada (Cornelius), formed the bedrock of the genre and influenced all of its groups, but the most prominent Shibuya-kei band was Pizzicato Five, who fused mainstream J-pop with a mix of jazz, soul, and lounge influences.

Music of Japan

AnisonJ-RockJapanese
Modern J-pop has its roots in traditional Japanese music, but significantly in 1960s pop and rock music, such as The Beatles and The Beach Boys, which led to Japanese rock bands such as Happy End fusing rock with Japanese music in the early 1970s. In 1990, the Japanese subsidiary of Tower Records defined J-pop as all Japanese music belonging to the Recording Industry Association of Japan except Japanese independent music (which they term "J-indie"); their stores began to use additional classifications, such as J-club, J-punk, J-hip-hop, J-reggae, J-anime, and Visual kei by 2008, after independent musicians started to release works via major labels.
Kayōkyoku became associated entirely with traditional Japanese structures, while more Western-style music was called Japanese pop ( or simply 'JPop').

Haruomi Hosono

Hosono HaruomiPhilharmonyHarry Hosono
After Happy End disbanded in 1973, Haruomi Hosono, a former member, began a solo career and later formed Yellow Magic Orchestra.
who is considered to be one of the most influential musicians in Japanese pop music history, credited with shaping the sound of Japanese pop for decades as well as pop music outside of Japan.

Ringo Sheena

Ringo ShiinaShiina RingoSheena Ringo
Although Japanese pop music changed from music based on Japanese pentatonic scale and distortional tetrachord to the more occidental music over time, music that drew from the traditional Japanese singing style remained popular (such as that of Ringo Shiina).
Sheena's name often appeared on the books, movies, TV dramas and songs, such as the Japanese movie All About Lily Chou-Chou (with The Beatles, Björk, and UA), Maximum the Hormone's song "Sheena basu tei de matsu.", Kreva's single "Idome", the Japanese movie Linda Linda Linda, the TV drama Furuhata Ninzaburō final series, the book by Taro Aso who is the 92nd Prime Minister of Japan Totetsumonai Nihon (as a singer representative of Jpop with Hikaru Utada).

Group Sounds

Group Sounds (Japan)
When the Group Sounds genre, which was inspired by Western rock, became popular, Japanese pop music adopted the major second, which was used in the final sounds of The Beatles' song "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and The Rolling Stones' song "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".

Happy End (band)

Happy EndApryl Fool
Modern J-pop has its roots in traditional Japanese music, but significantly in 1960s pop and rock music, such as The Beatles and The Beach Boys, which led to Japanese rock bands such as Happy End fusing rock with Japanese music in the early 1970s.
Their music has been cited as one of the origins of modern "J-pop", with each member continuing to contribute to its development after the group's break up.

TM Network

TMNTakashi Utsunomiya
Some Japanese musicians, such as Boøwy, TM Network, and Buck-Tick, were influenced by New Romanticism.
They are regarded as a prototype of J-pop, because Tetsuya Komuro became a famous producer of dance-oriented J-pop singers in 1990s.

Pepper Keibu

In 1976, female duo Pink Lady made their debut with the single "Pepper Keibu".

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
J-pop (ジェイポップ, jeipoppu; often stylized as J-POP; an abbreviation for Japanese pop), natively also known simply as pops, is a musical genre that entered the musical mainstream of Japan in the 1990s.
Popular music in post-war Japan has been heavily influenced by American and European trends, which has led to the evolution of J-pop, or Japanese popular music.

Wink (Japanese band)

WinkSachiko Suzuki
The late 1980s also saw the rise of the female duo Wink.
Wink was a J-pop female duo in the late 1980s and early-to-mid-1990s composed of Sachiko Suzuki and Shōko Aida .

Pop music

Poppop songpop group
Modern J-pop has its roots in traditional Japanese music, but significantly in 1960s pop and rock music, such as The Beatles and The Beach Boys, which led to Japanese rock bands such as Happy End fusing rock with Japanese music in the early 1970s. Popular styles of Japanese pop music included technopop during the 1970s–1980s, city pop in the 1980s, and Shibuya-kei in the 1990s.

Deen (band)

Deen
The period between around 1990 and 1993 was dominated by artists from the Being agency, including B'z, Tube, B.B.Queens, T-Bolan, Zard, Wands, Maki Ohguro, Deen, and Field of View.
Deen is a Japanese popular music band that formed in 1992.

Japanese reggae

J-reggaeJapansplash
In 1990, the Japanese subsidiary of Tower Records defined J-pop as all Japanese music belonging to the Recording Industry Association of Japan except Japanese independent music (which they term "J-indie"); their stores began to use additional classifications, such as J-club, J-punk, J-hip-hop, J-reggae, J-anime, and Visual kei by 2008, after independent musicians started to release works via major labels.

TRF (band)

TRFYU-KIDJ Koo
The period between 1994 and 1997 was dominated by dance and techno acts from the "Komuro family", such as TRF, Ryoko Shinohara, Yuki Uchida, Namie Amuro, Hitomi, Globe, Tomomi Kahala, and Ami Suzuki.
TRF (an abbreviation of Tetsuya Komuro Rave Factory) are a Japanese pop band.

B.B.Queens

B.B. QueensB.B.クイーンズ
The period between around 1990 and 1993 was dominated by artists from the Being agency, including B'z, Tube, B.B.Queens, T-Bolan, Zard, Wands, Maki Ohguro, Deen, and Field of View.
B.B.Queens (B.B.クイーンズ) were a 1990s J-Pop band whose debut single "Odoru Pompokolin" was the #1 song in 1990 on the Oricon charts, won the 32nd Japan Record Awards, was listed as the 3rd song on the JASRAC lists for 1991, and certified as a Million Record.

Wands (band)

Wands
The period between around 1990 and 1993 was dominated by artists from the Being agency, including B'z, Tube, B.B.Queens, T-Bolan, Zard, Wands, Maki Ohguro, Deen, and Field of View.
"Certainly more than everybody in the world"), which became one of standard "J-pop" songs.

Japanese hip hop

hip hopJ-Hip-hopJapanese hip-hop
In 1990, the Japanese subsidiary of Tower Records defined J-pop as all Japanese music belonging to the Recording Industry Association of Japan except Japanese independent music (which they term "J-indie"); their stores began to use additional classifications, such as J-club, J-punk, J-hip-hop, J-reggae, J-anime, and Visual kei by 2008, after independent musicians started to release works via major labels.