Jack Cole (artist)

Jack ColeJack Cole's Deadly Horror: The Chilling Archives of Horror Comics
Jack Ralph Cole (December 14, 1914 – August 13, 1958) was an American cartoonist best known for creating the comedic superhero Plastic Man, and his cartoons for Playboy magazine.wikipedia
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Plastic Man

Eel O'BrianKolonel KoolList of Plastic Man enemies
Jack Ralph Cole (December 14, 1914 – August 13, 1958) was an American cartoonist best known for creating the comedic superhero Plastic Man, and his cartoons for Playboy magazine.
Created by cartoonist Jack Cole, Plastic Man was one of the first superheroes to incorporate humor into mainstream action storytelling.

Playboy

Playboy MagazinePlayboy'' magazinePlayboy.com
Jack Ralph Cole (December 14, 1914 – August 13, 1958) was an American cartoonist best known for creating the comedic superhero Plastic Man, and his cartoons for Playboy magazine.
With a regular display of full-page color cartoons, it became a showcase for notable cartoonists, including Harvey Kurtzman, Jack Cole, Eldon Dedini, Jules Feiffer, Shel Silverstein, Erich Sokol, Roy Raymonde, Gahan Wilson, and Rowland B. Wilson.

Cartoonist

comics artistcomic book artistcartooning
Jack Ralph Cole (December 14, 1914 – August 13, 1958) was an American cartoonist best known for creating the comedic superhero Plastic Man, and his cartoons for Playboy magazine.
The debut of Playboy introduced full-page color cartoons by Jack Cole, Eldon Dedini, Roy Raymonde and others.

Harry "A" Chesler

Dynamic PublicationsHarry "A" Chesler ComicsHarry Chester Studios
After spending a year attempting to break in as a magazine/newspaper illustrator, Cole began drawing for the studio of the Harry "A" Chesler, one of the first comic-book "packagers" who supplied outsourced stories to publishers entering the new medium.
Chesler's studio, which began in either 1935 or 1936, provided early work to artists and writers including Jack Cole, Jack Binder, Otto Binder, Charles Biro, Mort Meskin, and many others.

List of Harvey Award winners

Jack Kirby Hall of FameHarvey AwardsBest Graphic Album of Previously Published Work
He was posthumously inducted into the comic book industry's Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1991 and the Will Eisner Award Hall of Fame in 1999.

Daredevil (Lev Gleason Publications)

DaredevilDaredevil ComicsReddevil
Lev Gleason Publications hired Cole in 1939 to edit Silver Streak Comics, where one of his first tasks was to revamp the newly created superhero Daredevil. After becoming an editor at Lev Gleason and revamping Jack Binder's original Golden Age Daredevil in 1940, Cole was hired at Quality Comics.
1940). Editor Jack Cole, who would create the classic Plastic Man a year later, revamped the character in the next issue and pitted him against Silver Streak's lead character, the villainous Claw, for a five-issue battle that made Daredevil a star.

Spirit (comics character)

The SpiritSpiritThe Spirit Section
He worked with Will Eisner, assisting on the writer-artist's signature hero The Spirit—a masked crime-fighter created for a weekly syndicated newspaper Sunday supplement and reprinted in Quality Comics.
Eisner was the editor, but also wrote and drew most entries—after the first few months, he had the uncredited assistance of writer Jules Feiffer and artists Jack Cole and Wally Wood, though Eisner's singular vision for the strip was a unifying factor.

Charles N. Landon

Landon School of Illustration and CartooningLandon School of Illustrating and Cartooning
Born in New Castle, Pennsylvania, Cole—the third of six children of a dry goods-store owner and amateur-entertainer father and a former elementary school-teacher mother—was untrained in art except for the Landon School of Illustration and Cartooning correspondence course.
Counted among Landon's most successful students were Carl Barks, Merrill Blosser, Gene Byrnes, Milton Caniff, Jack Cole, Roy Crane, V.T. Hamlin, Ethel Hays, Bill Holman and Chic Young.

Quality Comics

QualityComic Favorites, Inc.Earth-X
After becoming an editor at Lev Gleason and revamping Jack Binder's original Golden Age Daredevil in 1940, Cole was hired at Quality Comics.
Notable creators associated with the company included Jack Cole, Reed Crandall, Will Eisner, Lou Fine, Gill Fox, Paul Gustavson, Bob Powell, and Wally Wood.

Midnight (DC Comics)

Midnight
At the behest of Quality publisher Everett "Busy" Arnold, Cole later created his own satiric, Spirit-style hero, Midnight, for Smash Comics No.
A masked detective, he was created by writer-artist Jack Cole for Quality Comics during the 1930s to 1940s period fans and historians call the Golden Age of Comic Books.

List of Eisner Award winners

Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of FameWill Eisner Hall of FameWill Eisner Award Hall of Fame
He was posthumously inducted into the comic book industry's Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1991 and the Will Eisner Award Hall of Fame in 1999.

New Castle, Pennsylvania

New CastleNew Castle, PALawrence County Composite
Born in New Castle, Pennsylvania, Cole—the third of six children of a dry goods-store owner and amateur-entertainer father and a former elementary school-teacher mother—was untrained in art except for the Landon School of Illustration and Cartooning correspondence course.

Pep Comics

Pep
Other characters created or worked on by the prolific tyro include MLJ's The Comet in Pep Comics—who in short order became the first superhero to be killed—and his replacement, the Hangman.
"The Comet" by Jack Cole ran for the first 17 issues alongside The Shield.

Crack Comics

Beezy BumbleTor, Magic Master
In addition, Cole continued to draw one and two-page filler pieces, sometimes under the pseudonym Ralph Johns, and a memorable autobiographical appearance in "Inki," which appeared in Crack Comics #34.
Notable contributors to Crack Comics included Alfred Andriola, George Brenner, Gill Fox, Jack Cole, Paul Gustavson, Klaus Nordling, and Art Pinajian.

Will Eisner

EisnerEisner, WillW. Eisner
He worked with Will Eisner, assisting on the writer-artist's signature hero The Spirit—a masked crime-fighter created for a weekly syndicated newspaper Sunday supplement and reprinted in Quality Comics.
The primary wartime artists were the uncredited Lou Fine and Jack Cole, with future Kid Colt, Outlaw artist Jack Keller drawing backgrounds.

Everett M. "Busy" Arnold

Busy" ArnoldEverett "Busy" ArnoldBusy Arnold
At the behest of Quality publisher Everett "Busy" Arnold, Cole later created his own satiric, Spirit-style hero, Midnight, for Smash Comics No.
By then, in February 1940, Arnold moved his offices from New York City to the Gurley Building in Stamford, Connecticut, with staffers by now including editor Ed Cronin, Gill Fox, Plastic Man creator Jack Cole, Tony DiPreta, and Zoltan Szenics.

Lou Fine

During Eisner's World War II military service, Cole and Lou Fine were the primary Spirit ghost artists; their stories were reprinted in DC Comics' hardcover collections The Spirit Archives Vols.
Fine, along with Plastic Man creator Jack Cole, was a ghost-artist on Will Eisner's celebrated Sunday-supplement newspaper comic book The Spirit during Eisner's World War II military service, Fine inking over Cole's pencil work.

Art Spiegelman

SpiegelmanAce HoleArt Spieglman
Cole biographer Art Spiegelman said, "Cole's goddesses were estrogen soufflés who mesmerized the ineffectual saps who lusted after them." In 2003, writer-artist Art Spiegelman and artist Chip Kidd collaborated on a Cole biography, Spiegelman and Kidd, a portion of which had been published in The New Yorker magazine in 1999.
An essay he had published there on Jack Cole, the creator of Plastic Man, called "Forms Stretched to their Limits" was to form the basis for a book in 2001 about Cole called Jack Cole and Plastic Man: Forms Stretched to their Limits.

Police Comics

Cole created Plastic Man for a backup feature in Quality's Police Comics #1 (Aug.
Firebrand, the initial lead feature, was soon eclipsed by Jack Cole's popular Plastic Man, who took the cover and the lead from issues #5-102.

Chip Kidd

In 2003, writer-artist Art Spiegelman and artist Chip Kidd collaborated on a Cole biography, Spiegelman and Kidd, a portion of which had been published in The New Yorker magazine in 1999.
Kidd also supervised graphic novels at Pantheon, and in 2003 he collaborated with Art Spiegelman on a biography of cartoonist Jack Cole, Jack Cole and Plastic Man: Forms Stretched to Their Limits.

Fredric Wertham

WerthamDr. Fredric WerthamFrederic Wertham
2 (May 1947), became a centerpiece of psychiatrist Dr. Fredric Wertham's crusade against violent comic books.
Comics, especially the crime/horror titles pioneered by EC Comics, were not lacking in gruesome images; Wertham reproduced these extensively, pointing out what he saw as recurring morbid themes such as "injury to the eye" (as depicted in Plastic Man creator Jack Cole's "Murder, Morphine and Me", which he illustrated and probably wrote for publisher Magazine Village's True Crime Comics #2 (May 1947); it involved dope-dealing protagonist Mary Kennedy nearly getting stabbed in the eye "by a junkie with a hypodermic needle" in her dream sequence ).

Field Newspaper Syndicate

News America SyndicateChicago Sun-Times SyndicateField Syndicate
In 1958, Cole created his own daily newspaper comic strip, Betsy and Me, which he sold to the Chicago Sun-Times Syndicate.

Superhero

superheroessuperheroinesuper hero
Jack Ralph Cole (December 14, 1914 – August 13, 1958) was an American cartoonist best known for creating the comedic superhero Plastic Man, and his cartoons for Playboy magazine. Lev Gleason Publications hired Cole in 1939 to edit Silver Streak Comics, where one of his first tasks was to revamp the newly created superhero Daredevil.

Pennsylvania

PACommonwealth of PennsylvaniaPa.
Born in New Castle, Pennsylvania, Cole—the third of six children of a dry goods-store owner and amateur-entertainer father and a former elementary school-teacher mother—was untrained in art except for the Landon School of Illustration and Cartooning correspondence course.

Dry goods

dry-goodssundriesdry
Born in New Castle, Pennsylvania, Cole—the third of six children of a dry goods-store owner and amateur-entertainer father and a former elementary school-teacher mother—was untrained in art except for the Landon School of Illustration and Cartooning correspondence course.