Jack Johnson (boxer)

Jack JohnsonJohnsonFight of the CenturyBlack Jack JohnsonEtta Duryea JohnsonJack "Galveston Giant" JohnsonJack (John Arthur) JohnsonJack Johnson in Havana, CubaJeffries-Johnson fightJohn A. Johnson
John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer who, at the height of the Jim Crow era, became the first African American world heavyweight boxing champion (1908–1915).wikipedia
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List of lineal boxing world champions

Lineallineal flyweightWorld Light Heavyweight
John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer who, at the height of the Jim Crow era, became the first African American world heavyweight boxing champion (1908–1915).

James J. Jeffries

Jim JeffriesJames JeffriesJeffries
Among the period's most dominant champions, Johnson remains a boxing legend, with his 1910 fight against James J. Jeffries dubbed the "fight of the century".
He is perhaps most famous for being America's "Great White Hope", since the nation expected him to come out of his retirement to beat the African-American boxer Jack Johnson, who was at the time the Heavyweight Champion.

World Colored Heavyweight Championship

World Colored Heavyweight ChampionWorld Colored Heavyweight Champcolored heavyweight champ
Johnson won his first title on February 3, 1903, beating Denver Ed Martin on points in a 20-round match for the World Colored Heavyweight Championship.
This was the only recognized heavyweight championship available to blacks prior to Jack Johnson winning the world heavyweight title in 1908.

Tommy Burns (boxer)

Tommy BurnsBurnsTommy Burnes
Johnson held the title until it was vacated when he won the world heavyweight title from Tommy Burns in Sydney, Australia on Boxing Day 1908. Johnson's victory over the reigning world champion, Canadian Tommy Burns, at the Sydney Stadium in Australia, came after following Burns around the world for two years and taunting him in the press for a match.
Burns famously challenged all comers as Heavyweight Champion, leading to a celebrated bout with the American Jack Johnson.

Harry Wills

Only Harry Wills at 3,103 days and Peter Jackson at 3,041 days held the title longer.
Of all the black contenders between the heavyweight championship reigns of Jack Johnson and Joe Louis, Wills came closest to securing a title shot.

Mann Act

White-Slave Traffic ActWhite Slave Traffic Act of 1910The Mann Act
Johnson was arrested on charges of violating the Mann Act—forbidding one to transport a woman across state lines for "immoral purposes"—a racially motivated charge that embroiled him in controversy for his relationships, including marriages, with white women.
Some attribute enactment of the law to the case of world champion heavyweight boxer Jack Johnson.

Professional boxing

professional boxerprizefighterboxer
Prizefighting was illegal in Texas at the time and they were both arrested.
On December 26, 1908, heavyweight Jack Johnson became the first black heavyweight champion and a highly controversial figure in that racially charged era.

Ed Martin (boxer)

Denver Ed MartinEd Martin
Childs had twice won the black heavyweight title and continued to claim himself the true black champ despite having lost his title in a bout with George Byers and then, after retaking the title from Byers, losing it again to Denver Ed Martin.
Ed "Denver Ed" Martin (born September 10, 1881) was an African American boxer who was the World Colored Heavyweight Champion from 24 February 1902, when he beat Frank Childs, until 5 February 1903, when he lost his title to Jack Johnson, the only colored heavyweight champion (and first African American) to win the world's heavyweight championship.

Sam McVey

Sam McVea
While colored champ, he defeated ex-colored champs Denver Ed Martin and Frank Childs again and beat future colored heavyweight champs Sam McVey three times and Sam Langford once.
McVey ranked alongside Jack Johnson, Joe Jeanette, Sam Langford, and Harry Wills as the top black heavyweights of their generation.

Sam Langford

Sam Langford, the colored American fighting machine
While colored champ, he defeated ex-colored champs Denver Ed Martin and Frank Childs again and beat future colored heavyweight champs Sam McVey three times and Sam Langford once.
He was denied a shot at many World Championships, due to the color bar and by the refusal of Jack Johnson, the first African-American World Heavyweight Champion, to fight him in a rematch.

The Johnson–Jeffries Fight

The Johnson-Jeffries FightJeffries-Johnson World's Championship Boxing Contest
The Johnson-Jeffries Fight film received more public attention in the United States than any other film to date and for the next five years, until the release of The Birth of a Nation.
The Johnson–Jeffries Fight is a 1910 American film report on the heavyweight championship boxing fight between Jack Johnson and James J. Jeffries in Reno, Nevada.

Frank Childs

Johnson beat former black heavyweight champ Frank Childs on October 21, 1902.
His fight before that had been with white heavyweight contender Joe Choynski (the mentor of future colored heavyweight and world heavyweight title-holder Jack Johnson), who won by knockout (K.O.) in the third of a three-round fight.

Jess Willard

Dempsey/WillardJess
On April 5, 1915, Johnson lost his title to Jess Willard, a working cowboy from Kansas who started boxing when he was twenty-seven years old.
Jess Myron Willard (December 29, 1881 – December 15, 1968) was a world heavyweight boxing champion known as the Pottawatomie Giant who knocked out Jack Johnson in April 1915 for the heavyweight title.

Fight of the Century (disambiguation)

Fight of the Century
Among the period's most dominant champions, Johnson remains a boxing legend, with his 1910 fight against James J. Jeffries dubbed the "fight of the century".

Boxing

boxerboxersprofessional boxer
John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer who, at the height of the Jim Crow era, became the first African American world heavyweight boxing champion (1908–1915).
Notable counter punchers include Muhammad Ali, Joe Calzaghe, Vitali Klitschko, Evander Holyfield, Max Schmeling, Chris Byrd, Jim Corbett, Jack Johnson, Bernard Hopkins, Laszlo Papp, Jerry Quarry, Anselmo Moreno, James Toney, Marvin Hagler, Juan Manuel Márquez, Humberto Soto, Floyd Mayweather Jr., Roger Mayweather, Pernell Whitaker, Sergio Gabriel Martinez and Guillermo Rigondeaux.

Sydney Stadium

Rushcutters Bay Stadium
Johnson's victory over the reigning world champion, Canadian Tommy Burns, at the Sydney Stadium in Australia, came after following Burns around the world for two years and taunting him in the press for a match.
It also hosted the biggest sporting event in Australia's history up till then, where over 20,000 crammed in the stadium on 26 December 1908 to see Tommy Burns fight the African-American Jack Johnson.

Joe Choynski

On February 25, 1901, Johnson fought Joe Choynski in Galveston.
Choynski was never given an opportunity to fight for the heavyweight title, but enjoyed some stunning successes against famed heavyweights James J. Jeffries and Jack Johnson before they became champions.

Graceland Cemetery

GracelandGraceland Cemetery, Chicago
He is buried at Graceland Cemetery in Chicago.

Reno, Nevada

RenoReno, NVNevada (Reno)
The fight took place on July 4, 1910, in front of 20,000 people, at a ring built just for the occasion in downtown Reno, Nevada.
The "Fight of the Century" between Jack Johnson and James J. Jeffries was held in Reno in 1910.

Jim Crow laws

Jim CrowJim Crow eraJim Crow law
John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer who, at the height of the Jim Crow era, became the first African American world heavyweight boxing champion (1908–1915).
The boxers Jack Johnson and Joe Louis (both of whom became world heavyweight boxing champions) and track and field athlete Jesse Owens (who won four gold medals at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin) earned fame during this era.

Owney Madden

Owney "The Killer" MaddenOwen "Owney the Killer" MaddenOwen Madden
In 1920, Johnson opened a night club in Harlem; he sold it three years later to a gangster, Owney Madden, who renamed it the Cotton Club.
Madden purchased the Club Deluxe from former Heavyweight Boxing Champion Jack Johnson and reopened it a year later.

Stanley Ketchel

Stanley Ketchell
In 1909, he beat Tony Ross, Al Kaufman, and the middleweight champion Stanley Ketchel.
Ketchel's 1909 battle with Jack Johnson has been called by many a modern-day "David and Goliath".

Cotton Club

The Cotton Clubfamed Harlem clubHarlem Cotton Club
In 1920, Johnson opened a night club in Harlem; he sold it three years later to a gangster, Owney Madden, who renamed it the Cotton Club.
In 1920, heavyweight boxing champion Jack Johnson rented the upper floor of the building on the corner of 142nd Street and Lenox Avenue in the heart of Harlem and opened an intimate supper club called the Club Deluxe.

Bob Fitzsimmons

Robert FitzsimmonsBob "Ruby Robert" FitzsimmonsBob Fitzsimmon
However, Johnson did fight former champion Bob Fitzsimmons in July 1907, and knocked him out in two rounds.
In 1907 at age 44, Fitzsimmons fought much younger Jack Johnson, during the time period in which reigning champion James J. Jeffries refused to fight Johnson.

Lead Belly

Huddie LedbetterLeadbellyHuddie "Lead Belly" Ledbetter
Folksinger and blues singer Lead Belly referenced Johnson in a song about the Titanic: ''"Jack Johnson wanna get on board, Captain said I ain't hauling no coal. Fare thee, Titanic, fare thee well. When Jack Johnson heard that mighty shock, mighta seen the man do the Eagle rock. Fare thee, Titanic, fare thee well''" (The Eagle Rock was a popular dance at the time).
He also wrote songs about people in the news, such as Franklin D. Roosevelt, Adolf Hitler, Jean Harlow, Jack Johnson, the Scottsboro Boys and Howard Hughes.