Jackson, Mississippi

The entire Choctaw Nation's location and size compared to the U.S. state of Mississippi
Andrew Jackson, the 7th President of the United States and the city's namesake
"Raising the Stars and Stripes Over the Capitol of the State of Mississippi", engraving from Harper's Weekly, June 20, 1863, after the capture of Jackson by Union forces during the American Civil War
September 1863 map of the Siege of Jackson
Mississippi Old Capitol, downtown Jackson
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Map of Jackson in 1919
April 16, 1921 flood on Town Creek, a tributary of the Pearl River in Jackson. The photo is a view of East Capitol Street looking east from North Farish Street.
Standard Life Building, downtown Jackson
Old Greyhound Bus Station
Photograph of Jackson Mississippi taken from the International Space Station
Map of racial distribution in Jackson, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
1874 engraving in Scribner's Monthly of the Old Capitol, the seat of Mississippi's legislature from 1839 to 1903.
Jackson State University band "The Sonic Boom"
Millsaps College is one of several institutions in and around Jackson established before 1900.
Mississippi State Capitol
Thalia Mara Hall in Jackson, Mississippi
Lamar Life Building, downtown Jackson.
Veterans Memorial Stadium is the largest stadium facility in Jackson. Its parking lot often is used by employees of the University of Mississippi Medical Center nearby.

Capital and most populous city of the U.S. State of Mississippi.

- Jackson, Mississippi

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Mississippi

State in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered to the north by Tennessee; to the east by Alabama; to the south by the Gulf of Mexico; to the southwest by Louisiana; and to the northwest by Arkansas.

State in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered to the north by Tennessee; to the east by Alabama; to the south by the Gulf of Mexico; to the southwest by Louisiana; and to the northwest by Arkansas.

Choctaw Village near the Chefuncte, by Francois Bernard, 1869, Peabody Museum—Harvard University. The women are preparing dye in order to color cane strips for making baskets.
Pushmataha, Choctaw Principal Chief
The Big House at D'Evereux Plantation. Built in 1840, the mansion is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Confederate lines, Vicksburg, May 19, 1863. Shows assault by US 1st Battalion, 13th Infantry
The legislature of the State of Mississippi in 1890
Child workers, Pass Christian, 1911, by Lewis Hine
Mexican American boy and African American man at the Knowlton Plantation, Perthshire, Mississippi, in 1939, by Marion Post Wolcott
Dancing at a juke joint near Clarksdale, Mississippi, in 1939, by Marion Post Wolcott
The previous flag of Mississippi, used until June 30, 2020, featured the Confederate battle flag
Bottomland hardwood swamp near Ashland
Map of the Mississippi Delta Region (outlined in green)
Map with all counties and their county seats
Köppen climate types of Mississippi, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Hurricanes Camille (left) and Katrina from satellite imagery, as they approached the Mississippi Gulf Coast
Leaving Tennessee on US Highway 61
Clark Creek Natural Area, Wilkinson County
A racial/ethnic map of the state of Mississippi. The purple counties have black majorities, the blue ones have white majorities. The darker the color, the larger the majority.
Mississippi population density map
Liberty Baptist Church, Amite County
A Mississippi U.S. quarter
Sharecropper's daughter, Lauderdale County, 1935
2014 Corolla built by Toyota Motor Manufacturing Mississippi on display at the Tupelo Automobile Museum
Five Governors of Mississippi in 1976, from left: Ross Barnett, James P. Coleman, William L. Waller, John Bell Williams, and Paul B. Johnson Jr.
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
The Vicksburg Bridge carries I-20 and U.S. 80 across the Mississippi River at Vicksburg.
The Ross Barnett Reservoir at sunset
The Mississippi State Capitol was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2016.

Jackson is both the state's capital and largest city.

Jackson metropolitan area, Mississippi

Metropolitan statistical area in the central region of the U.S. state of Mississippi that covers seven counties: Copiah, Hinds, Holmes, Madison, Rankin, Simpson, and Yazoo.

Metropolitan statistical area in the central region of the U.S. state of Mississippi that covers seven counties: Copiah, Hinds, Holmes, Madison, Rankin, Simpson, and Yazoo.

Andrew Jackson
Mississippi State Capitol
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Jackson is the principal city of the MSA.

Hinds County, Mississippi

County located in the U.S. state of Mississippi.

County located in the U.S. state of Mississippi.

Public School Districts in Hinds County

Its county seats are Raymond and Jackson, the state capital.

A highway sign designating the border between Nicholas and Greenbrier counties in West Virginia along a secondary road

Madison County, Mississippi

County located in the U.S. state of Mississippi.

County located in the U.S. state of Mississippi.

A highway sign designating the border between Nicholas and Greenbrier counties in West Virginia along a secondary road

Madison County is part of the Jackson, MS Metropolitan Statistical Area.

A highway sign designating the border between Nicholas and Greenbrier counties in West Virginia along a secondary road

Rankin County, Mississippi

County located in the U.S. state of Mississippi.

County located in the U.S. state of Mississippi.

A highway sign designating the border between Nicholas and Greenbrier counties in West Virginia along a secondary road

Rankin County is part of the Jackson Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Evers at the White House in 1961

Medgar Evers

American civil rights activist and the NAACP's first field secretary in Mississippi who was assassinated by a white supremacist.

American civil rights activist and the NAACP's first field secretary in Mississippi who was assassinated by a white supremacist.

Evers at the White House in 1961
The rifle used by De La Beckwith to assassinate Evers
The Evers house at 2332 Margaret Walker Alexander Drive, now the Medgar and Myrlie Evers Home National Monument, where Medgar Evers was fatally shot after getting out of his car.
Medgar Evers's grave in Arlington National Cemetery in 2007
A statue of Evers at the Medgar Evers Boulevard Library in Jackson, Mississippi

Evers was murdered in 1963 at his home in Jackson, Mississippi, now the Medgar and Myrlie Evers Home National Monument, by Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the White Citizens' Council in Jackson.

The 1963 March on Washington participants and leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial

Civil rights movement

Political movement and campaign from 1954 to 1968 in the United States to abolish institutional racial segregation, discrimination, and disenfranchisement throughout the United States.

Political movement and campaign from 1954 to 1968 in the United States to abolish institutional racial segregation, discrimination, and disenfranchisement throughout the United States.

The 1963 March on Washington participants and leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial
The mob-style lynching of Will James, Cairo, Illinois, 1909
Lynching victim Will Brown, who was mutilated and burned during the Omaha, Nebraska race riot of 1919. Postcards and photographs of lynchings were popular souvenirs in the U.S.
KKK night rally near Chicago, in the 1920s
Colored Sailors room in World War I
A white gang looking for blacks during the Chicago race riot of 1919
White tenants seeking to prevent blacks from moving into the housing project erected this sign, Detroit, 1942.
In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice Earl Warren ruled unanimously that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional.
School integration, Barnard School, Washington, D.C., 1955
Emmett Till’s mother Mamie (middle) at her son's funeral in 1955. He was killed by white men after a white woman accused him of offending her in her family's grocery store.
Rosa Parks being fingerprinted after being arrested for not giving up her seat on a bus to a white person
White parents rally against integrating Little Rock's schools
Student sit-in at Woolworth in Durham, North Carolina on February 10, 1960
A mob beats Freedom Riders in Birmingham. This picture was reclaimed by the FBI from a local journalist who also was beaten and whose camera was smashed.
James Meredith walking to class accompanied by a U.S. Marshal and a Justice Department official
U.S. Army trucks loaded with Federal law enforcement personnel on the University of Mississippi campus 1962
Recreation of Martin Luther King Jr.'s cell in Birmingham Jail at the National Civil Rights Museum
Wreckage at the Gaston Motel following the bomb explosion on May 11, 1963
Congress of Racial Equality march in Washington D.C. on September 22, 1963, in memory of the children killed in the Birmingham bombings
Alabama governor George Wallace tried to block desegregation at the University of Alabama and is confronted by U.S. Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach in 1963.
The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom at the National Mall
Leaders of the March on Washington posing before the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963
Bayard Rustin (left) and Cleveland Robinson (right), organizers of the March, on August 7, 1963
Martin Luther King Jr. at a civil rights march on Washington, D.C.
Malcolm X meets with Martin Luther King Jr., March 26, 1964
"We Cater to White Trade Only" sign on a restaurant window in Lancaster, Ohio, in 1938. In 1964, Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested and spent a night in jail for attempting to eat at a white-only restaurant in St. Augustine, Florida.
White segregationists (foreground) trying to prevent black people from swimming at a "White only" beach in St. Augustine during the 1964 Monson Motor Lodge protests
Missing persons poster created by the FBI in 1964 shows the photographs of Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael Schwerner
Lyndon B. Johnson signs the historic Civil Rights Act of 1964
President Lyndon B. Johnson (center) meets with civil rights leaders Martin Luther King Jr., Whitney Young, and James Farmer, January 1964
Police attack non-violent marchers on "Bloody Sunday", the first day of the Selma to Montgomery marches.
Police arrest a man during the Watts riots in Los Angeles, August 1965
A 3,000-person shantytown called Resurrection City was established in 1968 on the National Mall as part of the Poor People's Campaign.
Mississippi State Penitentiary
Fannie Lou Hamer of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (and other Mississippi-based organizations) is an example of local grassroots leadership in the movement.
Armed Lumbee Indians aggressively confronting Klansmen in the Battle of Hayes Pond
Jewish civil rights activist Joseph L. Rauh Jr. marching with Martin Luther King Jr. in 1963
Gold medalist Tommie Smith (center) and bronze medalist John Carlos (right) showing the raised fist on the podium after the 200 m race at the 1968 Summer Olympics; both wear Olympic Project for Human Rights badges. Peter Norman (silver medalist, left) from Australia also wears an OPHR badge in solidarity with Smith and Carlos.
Mural of Malcolm X in Belfast
Ku Klux Klan demonstration in St. Augustine, Florida in 1964
Attorney General Robert Kennedy speaking before a hostile Civil Rights crowd protesting low minority hiring in his Justice Department June 14, 1963

On May 24, 1961, the freedom riders continued their rides into Jackson, Mississippi, where they were arrested for "breaching the peace" by using "white only" facilities.

Memphis, Tennessee

City in the U.S. state of Tennessee.

City in the U.S. state of Tennessee.

Memphis in the mid-1850s
Attack on Irving Block by General Forrest in 1864
Historic aerial view of Memphis, 1870
Woodcut representing the waterfront of Memphis, c. 1879
Cotton merchants on Union Avenue (1937)
The American Queen docked at Beale Street Landing along the riverfront
Map of racial distribution in Memphis, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
Asian-American tombstones in Elmwood Cemetery
A Memphis Police Department vehicle
Memphis products treemap, 2020
Peabody Hotel
National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis (2012)
Memphis Brooks Museum of Art
Mud Island Mississippi River Park
Stax Museum and Satellite Record Shop
Memphis National Cemetery
FedExForum during a Grizzlies game
Early nursing class in Memphis
Three bridges over the Mississippi
FedEx aircraft at Memphis International Airport
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

I-55 connects Memphis to St. Louis and Chicago to the north, and Jackson, Mississippi and New Orleans to the south.

University of Mississippi

The University of Mississippi was the first college in the Southeast to hire a female faculty member: Sarah McGehee Isom in 1885.
James Meredith accompanied by federal officials on campus
The university owns Rowan Oak, former home of Nobel Prize-winning writer William Faulkner and a National Historic Landmark.
Barnard Observatory (1859) was designed to house the world's largest telescope.
Research ponds at the University of Mississippi Field Station
Panoramic view of the Trent Lott Leadership Institute
The class of 1861
Robert Q. Marston, Director of the National Institutes of Health, served as medical school dean.
William Faulkner, novelist who won the 1949 Nobel Prize in Literature
One of the earliest photographs of the Ole Miss band, "The Pride of the South" (1925)
Starship Technologies robots on campus. A traditional dorm can be seen in the foreground: larger modern dorms can be seen in the background.
alt=Ventress Hall|Ventress Hall (1889)
Kennon Observatory (1939)
Bryant Hall (1911)<ref name="catalog.olemiss.edu"/>
alt=Ole Miss Student Union|Ole Miss Student Union (2019)

The University of Mississippi, commonly known as Ole Miss, is a public research university adjacent to Oxford, Mississippi with a medical center in Jackson.

Raymond, Mississippi

City in Hinds County, Mississippi, United States.

City in Hinds County, Mississippi, United States.

Cooper's Well, circa 1900
Cooper's Well Resort, circa 1900
Raymond Courthouse
Raymond water tower
Cain Cochran Hall on the Raymond Campus of Hinds Community College

Raymond is one of two county seats of Hinds County (along with Jackson) and is the home of the main campus of Hinds Community College.