Jackson, Mississippi

The entire Choctaw Nation's location and size compared to the U.S. state of Mississippi
Andrew Jackson, the 7th President of the United States and the city's namesake
"Raising the Stars and Stripes Over the Capitol of the State of Mississippi", engraving from Harper's Weekly, June 20, 1863, after the capture of Jackson by Union forces during the American Civil War
September 1863 map of the Siege of Jackson
Mississippi Old Capitol, downtown Jackson
centre
Map of Jackson in 1919
April 16, 1921 flood on Town Creek, a tributary of the Pearl River in Jackson. The photo is a view of East Capitol Street looking east from North Farish Street.
Standard Life Building, downtown Jackson
Old Greyhound Bus Station
Photograph of Jackson Mississippi taken from the International Space Station
Map of racial distribution in Jackson, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
1874 engraving in Scribner's Monthly of the Old Capitol, the seat of Mississippi's legislature from 1839 to 1903.
Jackson State University band "The Sonic Boom"
Millsaps College is one of several institutions in and around Jackson established before 1900.
Mississippi State Capitol
Thalia Mara Hall in Jackson, Mississippi
Lamar Life Building, downtown Jackson.
Veterans Memorial Stadium is the largest stadium facility in Jackson. Its parking lot often is used by employees of the University of Mississippi Medical Center nearby.

Capital and most populous city of the U.S. State of Mississippi.

- Jackson, Mississippi

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Meredith in 2007

James Meredith

American civil rights activist, writer, political adviser, and Air Force veteran who became, in 1962, the first African-American student admitted to the racially segregated University of Mississippi after the intervention of the federal government ( an event that was a flashpoint in the civil rights movement).

American civil rights activist, writer, political adviser, and Air Force veteran who became, in 1962, the first African-American student admitted to the racially segregated University of Mississippi after the intervention of the federal government ( an event that was a flashpoint in the civil rights movement).

Meredith in 2007
Meredith in 1962
U.S. Army trucks loaded with steel-helmeted federal agents roll across the University of Mississippi campus on October 3, 1962.
Meredith and Judy Alsobrooks in 1982
Meredith in 2010

In 1966, Meredith planned a solo 220-mile March Against Fear from Memphis, Tennessee, to Jackson, Mississippi; he wanted to highlight continuing racism in the South and encourage voter registration after passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Map of the United States with Mississippi highlighted

List of municipalities in Mississippi

State in the Southern United States.

State in the Southern United States.

Map of the United States with Mississippi highlighted
alt=Downtown Jackson, Mississippi|Downtown Jackson, the capital and largest city by population in Mississippi
alt=Gulfport, Mississippi|Gulfport, the second largest city by population in Mississippi
alt=Southaven Towne Center Mall|Southaven, suburb of Memphis, Tennessee and third largest city in Mississippi by population
alt=Hattiesburg, Mississippi|Hattiesburg, Mississippi's fourth largest city by population
alt=Biloxi, Mississippi|Biloxi, Mississippi's fifth largest city by population
alt=Downtown Meridian, Mississippi|Downtown Meridian, the sixth largest city in Mississippi by population

, the largest municipality by population in Mississippi is Jackson, with 173,514 residents, and the smallest is Satartia, with 55 residents.

I-55 splits from I-40 here in West Memphis and heads north toward Jonesboro and the Missouri border.

Interstate 55

Major Interstate Highway in the central United States.

Major Interstate Highway in the central United States.

I-55 splits from I-40 here in West Memphis and heads north toward Jonesboro and the Missouri border.
I-44/I-55/I-64/I-70 on one highway sign in downtown St. Louis
Northern terminus at US 41 (Lake Shore Drive) in Chicago

The major cities that I-55 connects to are (from south to north) New Orleans, Louisiana; Jackson, Mississippi; Memphis, Tennessee; St. Louis, Missouri; and Chicago, Illinois.

University of Mississippi Medical Center

University Medical Center, circa 1950

University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) is the health sciences campus of the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) and is located in Jackson, Mississippi, United States.

Theodore G. Bilbo

American politician who twice served as governor of Mississippi (1916–20, 1928–32) and later was elected a U.S. Senator (1935–47).

American politician who twice served as governor of Mississippi (1916–20, 1928–32) and later was elected a U.S. Senator (1935–47).

Senator Theodore G. Bilbo
Bilbo towards the end of his life

During this term Bilbo caused controversy by attempting to move the University of Mississippi from Oxford to Jackson.

Louisiana Indians Walking Along a Bayou Alfred Boisseau – 1847

Choctaw

Now Alabama and Mississippi.

Now Alabama and Mississippi.

Louisiana Indians Walking Along a Bayou Alfred Boisseau – 1847
The Willoughby Disk, a Mississippian ceremonial stone palette from Moundville Archaeological Park, housed onsite in the Jones Archaeological Museum. Photo by Jeffrey Reed.
Watercolor painting of Choctaw men, painted for war and holding scalps, and children, by Alexandre de Batz, c. mid–18th century
Choctaw Village near the Chefuncte, by Francois Bernard, 1869. (Peabody Museum – Harvard University.) The women are preparing dye to color cane strips for making baskets.
The complete Choctaw Nation shaded in blue in relation to the U.S. state of Mississippi.
Pushmataha, (c. 1764-1824)
In 1830 Mosholatubbee sought to be elected to the Congress of the United States. 1834, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Kutteeotubbee was a noted warrior. 1834, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Choctaw Eagle Dance, 1835–37, by George Catlin; Smithsonian American Art Museum
Choctaw chief Greenwood LeFlore's plantation home, Malmaison, was built in 1852 near Greenwood, Mississippi, and was described as a "palace in the wilderness."
Kindred Spirits sculpture in Midleton, County Cork, Ireland.
Jackson McCurtain, Lieutenant Colonel of the First Choctaw Battalion, CSA, late principal chief
Choctaw girls in 1868. Smithsonian Institution.
Peter Pitchlynn was the Choctaw Principal Chief from 1864–1866, and a Choctaw Delegate to Washington, DC for nearly two decades following. He is buried in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Painting, 1834, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Faunceway Baptiste, a Choctaw man of mixed-race ancestry. 1868, Smithsonian Institution.
Choctaw Nation senate in 1898. Oklahoma Historical Society.
From left to right, Chief Wesley Johnson, T. B. Sullivan, Culberson Davis, James E. Arnold, and Emil John.
Louisiana Choctaws in front of their cabin in 1909
Choctaws in training in World War I for coded radio & telephone transmissions
Wounded Choctaw soldier in World War I, U.S. National Red Cross Hospital No. 5, Auteuil, France
Group of Mississippi Choctaw males in the late 50s or early 60s. Photograph by Bob Ferguson.
Phillip Martin and family in the late 1950s or early 1960s
Norma Howard (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma), award-winning watercolor painter, with Choctaw stickball sticks made by her son.
Image from video of Senate Indian Affairs Committee Hearing on 'Lobbying Practices Involving Indian Tribes' on September 29, 2004
Tullockchishko (Drinks the Juice of the Stones) was the greatest of Choctaw stickball players, 1834.
A Mississippian era engraved shell discovered at Eddyville, Kentucky
Modern geographic distribution of the Choctaw language.
Mississippi Choctaw group wearing traditional garb, c. 1908.

Martin died in Jackson, Mississippi, on February 4, 2010.

Southern terminus of US 51 at US 61, LaPlace

U.S. Route 51

Major south-north United States highway that extends 1277 mi from the western suburbs of New Orleans, Louisiana, to within 150 ft of the Wisconsin–Michigan state line.

Major south-north United States highway that extends 1277 mi from the western suburbs of New Orleans, Louisiana, to within 150 ft of the Wisconsin–Michigan state line.

Southern terminus of US 51 at US 61, LaPlace
US 51 between Mounds and Cairo, during the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927
Northern terminus of US 51 at US 2 in Hurley, WI

Northwest of Crystal Springs, it runs concurrently with I-55 and then splits at the interchange with I-20 in Jackson.

Citizens' Councils logo

Citizens' Councils

Associated network of white supremacist, segregationist organizations in the United States, concentrated in the South and created as part of a white backlash against the US Supreme Court's landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling.

Associated network of white supremacist, segregationist organizations in the United States, concentrated in the South and created as part of a white backlash against the US Supreme Court's landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling.

Citizens' Councils logo
Clipping from Citizens' Council newspaper, June 1961
Joe D. Waggonner Jr.

After he left the editorship of the Shreveport Journal in 1971, George W. Shannon relocated to Jackson, Mississippi, to work on The Citizen, a monthly magazine of the Citizens' Council.

African Americans

Ethnic group consisting of Americans with partial or total ancestry from sub-Saharan Africa.

Ethnic group consisting of Americans with partial or total ancestry from sub-Saharan Africa.

Slaves processing tobacco in 17th-century Virginia, illustration from 1670
The first slave auction at New Amsterdam in 1655, illustration from 1895 by Howard Pyle
Reproduction of a handbill advertising a slave auction in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1769
Crispus Attucks, the first "martyr" of the American Revolution. He was of Native American and African-American descent.
Frederick Douglass, ca 1850
Slaves Waiting for Sale: Richmond, Virginia, 1853. Note the new clothes. The domestic slave trade broke up many families, and individuals lost their connection to families and clans.
Harriet Tubman, around 1869
A group of White men pose for a 1919 photograph as they stand over the Black victim Will Brown who had been lynched and had his body mutilated and burned during the Omaha race riot of 1919 in Omaha, Nebraska. Postcards and photographs of lynchings were popular souvenirs in the U.S.
Rosa Parks being fingerprinted after being arrested for not giving up her seat on a bus to a White person
March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963, shows civil rights leaders and union leaders
Black Lives Matter protest in response to the fatal shooting of Philando Castile in July 2016
Proportion of African Americans in each U.S. state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico as of the 2020 United States Census
U.S. Census map indicating U.S. counties with fewer than 25 Black or African-American inhabitants
Graph showing the percentage of the African-American population living in the American South, 1790–2010. Note the major declines between 1910 and 1940 and 1940–1970, and the reverse trend post-1970. Nonetheless, the absolute majority of the African-American population has always lived in the American South.
Former slave reading, 1870
Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson is director of New York City's Hayden Planetarium
The US homeownership rate according to race
This graph shows the real median US household income by race: 1967 to 2011, in 2011 dollars.
"Lift Every Voice and Sing" being sung by the family of Barack Obama, Smokey Robinson and others in the White House in 2014
Genetic clustering of 128 African Americans, by Zakharaia et al. (2009). Each vertical bar represents an individual. The color scheme of the bar plot matches that in the PCA plot.
Al Sharpton led the Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks protest on August 28, 2020.
Although the ban on interracial marriage ended in California in 1948, entertainer Sammy Davis Jr. faced a backlash for his involvement with a White woman in 1957
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. remains the most prominent political leader in the American civil rights movement and perhaps the most influential African-American political figure in general.
BET founder Robert L. Johnson with former U.S. President George W. Bush
A traditional soul food dinner consisting of fried chicken with macaroni and cheese, collard greens, breaded fried okra and cornbread
Mount Zion United Methodist Church is the oldest African-American congregation in Washington, D.C.
Masjid Malcolm Shabazz in Harlem, New York City
This parade float displayed the word "Afro-Americans" in 1911.
Michelle Obama was the First Lady of the United States; she and her husband, President Barack Obama, are the first African Americans to hold these positions.
Racially segregated Negro section of keypunch operators at the US Census Bureau

Other large cities with African-American majorities include Jackson, Mississippi (79.4%), Miami Gardens, Florida (76.3%), Baltimore, Maryland (63%), Birmingham, Alabama (62.5%), Memphis, Tennessee (61%), New Orleans, Louisiana (60%), Montgomery, Alabama (56.6%), Flint, Michigan (56.6%), Savannah, Georgia (55.0%), Augusta, Georgia (54.7%), Atlanta, Georgia (54%, see African Americans in Atlanta), Cleveland, Ohio (53.3%), Newark, New Jersey (52.35%), Washington, D.C. (50.7%), Richmond, Virginia (50.6%), Mobile, Alabama (50.6%), Baton Rouge, Louisiana (50.4%), and Shreveport, Louisiana (50.4%).

Mississippi Braves

Alex Wood pitching for the Mississippi Braves
M-Braves current home, Trustmark Park
Greenville Braves logo. The franchise moved from Greenville to Pearl at the end of the 2004 season.
thumb|Trustmark Park, home of the Mississippi Braves

The Mississippi Braves, or M-Braves as they are referred to locally, are a Minor League Baseball team based in Pearl, Mississippi, a suburb of Jackson.