Jackson, Mississippi

The entire Choctaw Nation's location and size compared to the U.S. state of Mississippi
Andrew Jackson, the 7th President of the United States and the city's namesake
"Raising the Stars and Stripes Over the Capitol of the State of Mississippi", engraving from Harper's Weekly, June 20, 1863, after the capture of Jackson by Union forces during the American Civil War
September 1863 map of the Siege of Jackson
Mississippi Old Capitol, downtown Jackson
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Map of Jackson in 1919
April 16, 1921 flood on Town Creek, a tributary of the Pearl River in Jackson. The photo is a view of East Capitol Street looking east from North Farish Street.
Standard Life Building, downtown Jackson
Old Greyhound Bus Station
Photograph of Jackson Mississippi taken from the International Space Station
Map of racial distribution in Jackson, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
1874 engraving in Scribner's Monthly of the Old Capitol, the seat of Mississippi's legislature from 1839 to 1903.
Jackson State University band "The Sonic Boom"
Millsaps College is one of several institutions in and around Jackson established before 1900.
Mississippi State Capitol
Thalia Mara Hall in Jackson, Mississippi
Lamar Life Building, downtown Jackson.
Veterans Memorial Stadium is the largest stadium facility in Jackson. Its parking lot often is used by employees of the University of Mississippi Medical Center nearby.

Capital and most populous city of the U.S. State of Mississippi.

- Jackson, Mississippi

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Lumumba in 2013

Chokwe Lumumba

American attorney and politician, affiliated with the Republic of New Afrika and serving as its second vice president.

American attorney and politician, affiliated with the Republic of New Afrika and serving as its second vice president.

Lumumba in 2013

In 1988 Lumumba returned to Jackson, Mississippi.

Terry High School (Mississippi)

Senior high school in Terry, Mississippi.

Senior high school in Terry, Mississippi.

It serves Terry and Byram as well as sections of Jackson.

Portrait by Ralph Eleaser Whiteside Earl, c. undefined 1835

Andrew Jackson

American lawyer, general, and statesman who served as the 7th president of the United States from 1829 to 1837.

American lawyer, general, and statesman who served as the 7th president of the United States from 1829 to 1837.

Portrait by Ralph Eleaser Whiteside Earl, c. undefined 1835
Young Jackson Refusing to Clean Major Coffin's Boots (1876 lithograph)
Notice of reward offered by Jackson for return of an enslaved man
General Andrew Jackson as pictured in Harper's Magazine, Vol 28, "War with the Creek Indians", page 605, 1864
In the Treaty of Fort Jackson, the Muscogee surrendered large parts of present-day Alabama and Georgia.
General Andrew Jackson by John Wesley Jarvis, c. undefined 1819
The Battle of New Orleans. General Andrew Jackson stands on the parapet of his defenses as his troops repulse attacking Highlanders, by painter Edward Percy Moran in 1910.
Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans, painted by Thomas Sully in 1845 from an earlier portrait he had completed from life in 1824
Trial of Robert Ambrister during the Seminole War. Ambrister was one of two British subjects executed by General Jackson. (1848)
Teracotta bust of General Jackson by William Rush, 1819
Jackson in 1824, painted by Thomas Sully
1828 election results
President Andrew Jackson
New York: Ritchie & Co. (1860)
Jackson's Indian Removal Act and subsequent treaties resulted in the forced removal of the major tribes of the Southeast from their traditional territories, many along the Trail of Tears.
Portrait of Jackson by Earl, 1830
William C. Rives, Jackson's Minister to France, successfully negotiated a reparations treaty with France in 1831.
1832 election results
1833 Democratic cartoon shows Jackson destroying the "Devil's Bank"
Richard Lawrence's attempt on Jackson's life, as depicted in an 1835 etching
USS Porpoise (1836), a brig ship laid down in 1835 and launched in May 1836; used in the U.S. Exploring Expedition
A New York newspaper blamed the Panic of 1837 on Andrew Jackson, depicted in spectacles and top hat.
Mezzotint after a Daguerreotype of Jackson by Mathew Brady, April 15, 1845
Tennessee Gentleman, portrait of Jackson, c. 1831, from the collection of The Hermitage
Andrew Jackson as Grand Master of Tennessee, 1822
Equestrian statue of Jackson, Jackson County Courthouse, Kansas City, Missouri, commissioned by Judge Harry S. Truman
Jackson portrait on obverse $20 bill
2-cent red stamp
2-cent green stamp
The tomb of Andrew and Rachel Jackson located at The Hermitage

Numerous counties and cities are named after him, including the cities of Jacksonville in Florida and North Carolina; the cities of Jackson in Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee; the city of Andrew in Iowa; Jackson County in Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, and Oregon; and Jackson Parish in Louisiana.

Photograph by Mathew Brady of Sherman at Washington, D.C., in May 1865. The black ribbon of mourning on his left arm is for President Abraham Lincoln.

William Tecumseh Sherman

American soldier, businessman, educator, and author.

American soldier, businessman, educator, and author.

Photograph by Mathew Brady of Sherman at Washington, D.C., in May 1865. The black ribbon of mourning on his left arm is for President Abraham Lincoln.
Sherman's childhood home in Lancaster
Young Sherman in military uniform
California Registered Historic Landmark plaque at the location in Jackson Square, San Francisco, of the branch of the Bank of Lucas, Turner & Co. that Sherman directed from 1853 to 1857
Two cannons on display in front of the Military Science building at Louisiana State University, which were used at the Battle of Fort Sumter and procured by Sherman for the university after the U.S. Civil War.
Portrait by Mathew Brady, c. undefined 1864
Oil portrait of Sherman by George P. A. Healy, 1866
Engraving depicting Admiral Porter's flotilla of gunships and transports arriving below Vicksburg on April 16, 1863. General Sherman is rowing out to the flagship, the USS Benton, in a yawl.
Map of the Battles for Chattanooga, 1863
Map of Sherman's campaigns in Georgia and the Carolinas, 1864–1865
Sherman on horseback at Federal Fort No. 7, after the Atlanta Campaign, September 1864
Green–Meldrim House, which served as Sherman's headquarters after his capture of Savannah in December 1864
The Burning of Columbia, South Carolina (1865) by William Waud for Harper's Weekly
From left to right, Sherman, Grant, Lincoln, and Porter meet on board the River Queen on March 27, 1865, near City Point, Virginia. The 1868 oil painting The Peacemakers by G. P. A. Healy is in the White House collection.
Sherman with Howard, Logan, Hazen, Davis, Slocum, and Mower, photographed by Mathew Brady, May 1865
Portrait by Mathew Brady or Levin C. Handy, between 1865 and 1880
Photograph by G. N. Barnard of Sherman's troops destroying a railroad in Atlanta, 1864
An 1868 engraving by Alexander Hay Ritchie depicting the March to the Sea
Map of Sherman's advance from Atlanta to Goldsboro
Cover of sheet music for a song celebrating the March to the Sea (1865)
Sherman (third from left) and other Indian Peace Commissioners in council with native chiefs and headmen, at the signing of the Treaty of Fort Laramie in 1868
Portrait of Sherman in the frontispiece of the second edition of his Memoirs (1886). The engraving is based on a photograph taken ca. 1885 by Napoleon Sarony.
Shoulder strap insignia, introduced by Sherman in 1872 for his use as General of the Army
Sherman in his later years, in civilian evening clothes
Sherman's death mask
William Tecumseh Sherman monument by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, 1902, located at Grand Army Plaza in Manhattan, New York, incorporates a statue of Nike titled Victory

During the siege of Vicksburg, Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston had gathered a force of 30,000 men in Jackson, Mississippi, with the intention of relieving the garrison under the command of John C. Pemberton that was trapped inside Vicksburg.

I-55 splits from I-40 here in West Memphis and heads north toward Jonesboro and the Missouri border.

Interstate 55

Major Interstate Highway in the central United States.

Major Interstate Highway in the central United States.

I-55 splits from I-40 here in West Memphis and heads north toward Jonesboro and the Missouri border.
I-44/I-55/I-64/I-70 on one highway sign in downtown St. Louis
Northern terminus at US 41 (Lake Shore Drive) in Chicago

The major cities that I-55 connects to are (from south to north) New Orleans, Louisiana; Jackson, Mississippi; Memphis, Tennessee; St. Louis, Missouri; and Chicago, Illinois.

Meridian, Mississippi

Seventh largest city in the U.S. state of Mississippi, with a population of 41,148 at the 2010 census and an estimated population in 2018 of 36,347.

Seventh largest city in the U.S. state of Mississippi, with a population of 41,148 at the 2010 census and an estimated population in 2018 of 36,347.

A monument in Rose Hill Cemetery honoring Lewis A. Ragsdale, one of the founders of Meridian.
Union Army General William Tecumseh Sherman fought and won the Battle of Meridian in 1864.
Downtown Meridian in the early 1900s (photo taken near intersection of 22nd Ave and 4th St looking north)
Meridian Union Station in the early 1900s
Looking into downtown Meridian from the 22nd Avenue Bridge in 2008. The Hotel Meridian was later demolished.
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Meridian City Hall after restoration efforts
Meridian City Council ward map
Meridian Museum of Art
The Riley Center, renovated in 2006
Hamasa Shrine Temple Theater
Dentzel Carousel in Highland Park
Upper lake at Bonita Lakes park
Okatibbee Lake
Meridian's Union Station
Highways in Meridian
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Meridian Community College has served the city since 1937
The headquarters of Meridian's only daily newspaper, The Meridian Star

Along major highways, the city is 93 mi east of Jackson, Mississippi; 154 mi southwest of Birmingham, Alabama; 202 mi northeast of New Orleans, Louisiana; and 231 mi southeast of Memphis, Tennessee.

Biloxi, Mississippi

City in and one of two county seats of Harrison County, Mississippi, United States .

City in and one of two county seats of Harrison County, Mississippi, United States .

Old Biloxi (site B) and New Biloxi (site A), French map, beginning of 18th century
Looking West down Howard Avenue at Lameuse Street, 1906
Child laborers picking shrimp in Biloxi, 1911. Photo by Lewis Hine.
Beauvoir, the post-war home of Confederate States President Jefferson Davis
Jefferson Davis Presidential Library and Museum at Beauvoir
Location of Biloxi, east of Gulfport (center), on Gulf of Mexico
Biloxi casinos
Biloxi City Hall
Hurricane Katrina pushed houses inland along the Mississippi Gulf Coast, including at Biloxi.
Casino barges floated ashore in Biloxi during Hurricane Katrina's storm surge.
U.S. Navy personnel perform a search and rescue mission in Biloxi after Hurricane Katrina.
Biloxi beach during cleanup of storm debris
Front view of Beauvoir in Biloxi, 7 months after Hurricane Katrina

Prior to Hurricane Katrina, Biloxi was the third-largest city in Mississippi, behind Jackson and Gulfport.

Richland, Mississippi

City in Rankin County, Mississippi.

City in Rankin County, Mississippi.

It is a suburb of Jackson Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Eudora Welty in 1962

Eudora Welty

American short story writer, novelist and photographer, who wrote about the American South.

American short story writer, novelist and photographer, who wrote about the American South.

Eudora Welty in 1962
The Eudora Welty House
Welty is presented the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Jimmy Carter in 1980
Welty's headstone at Greenwood Cemetery in Jackson, Mississippi

Her house in Jackson, Mississippi, has been designated as a National Historic Landmark and is open to the public as a house museum.

Cathedral of St. Peter

Roman Catholic Diocese of Jackson

Diocese in the ecclesiastical province of Mobile, in the southern United States of America.

Diocese in the ecclesiastical province of Mobile, in the southern United States of America.

Cathedral of St. Peter
Former diocese Coat of Arms

By the mid-20th century, the capitol of the state of Mississippi, Jackson, had grown to perhaps be a more appropriate center for the administration of the diocese.