Jackson Pollock

PollockJackson PollackJack [sic] PollockJacksonJean Fils MerlinNumber 1'' (painting)Paul Jackson PollockPollackPollock, Jacksonsquashed
Paul Jackson Pollock (January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956) was an American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement.wikipedia
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Abstract expressionism

abstract expressionistAbstract Expressionistsabstract
Paul Jackson Pollock (January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956) was an American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement.
Jackson Pollock's dripping paint onto a canvas laid on the floor is a technique that has its roots in the work of André Masson, Max Ernst, and David Alfaro Siqueiros.

Lee Krasner

Lee Krasner-Pollock
In 1945, he married the artist Lee Krasner, who became an important influence on his career and on his legacy.
Lenore "Lee" Krasner (October 27, 1908 – June 19, 1984) was an American abstract expressionist painter, with a strong speciality in collage, who was married to Jackson Pollock.

Art Students League of New York

Art Students LeagueArt Students' LeagueThe Art Students League of New York
In 1930, following his older brother Charles Pollock, he moved to New York City, where they both studied under Thomas Hart Benton at the Art Students League.
The League's popularity persisted into the 1920s and 1930s under the hand of instructors like painter Thomas Hart Benton, who counted among his students there the young Jackson Pollock and other avant-garde artists who would rise to prominence in the 1940s.

Charles Pollock

Charlie
In 1930, following his older brother Charles Pollock, he moved to New York City, where they both studied under Thomas Hart Benton at the Art Students League.
Charles Cecil Pollock (25 December 1902 in Denver, Colorado - 8 May 1988 in Paris) was an American abstract painter and the eldest brother of artist Jackson Pollock.

Federal Art Project

Federal Arts ProjectWPA Federal Art ProjectFederal Art Projects
From 1938 to 1942 Pollock worked for the WPA Federal Art Project.
As a result, the Federal Art Project supported such iconic artists as Jackson Pollock before their work could earn them income.

Mural (1943)

MuralMural'' (1943)
He received the commission to create the 8 by Mural (1943) for the entry to her new townhouse.
Mural is a large painting by American artist Jackson Pollock.

Clement Greenberg

GreenbergianClement Greenberg’sClement Greenburg
After seeing the big mural, the art critic Clement Greenberg wrote: "I took one look at it and I thought, 'Now that's great art,' and I knew Jackson was the greatest painter this country had produced."
He is best remembered for his association with the art movement Abstract Expressionism and the painter Jackson Pollock.

Sidney Janis

Sidney Janis Gallery
During this period, Pollock had moved to the Sidney Janis Gallery, a more commercial gallery; the demand for his work from collectors was great.
As the critic Clement Greenberg explained in a 1958 tribute to the dealer, Janis' exhibition practices had helped to establish the legitimacy of the Americans, for his policy "not only implied, it declared, that Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Phillip Guston, Mark Rothko, and Robert Motherwell were to be judged by the same standards as Matisse and Picasso, without condescension, without making allowances."

Drip painting

dripdrippingDripping (art)
He later used paint pouring as one of several techniques on canvases of the early 1940s, such as Male and Female and Composition with Pouring I. After his move to Springs, he began painting with his canvases laid out on the studio floor and he developed what was later called his "drip" technique.
Drip painting was however to find particular expression in the work of the mid-twentieth-century artists Janet Sobel and Jackson Pollock.

Ruth Kligman

Pollock and Krasner's relationship began to crumble by 1956, owing to Pollock's continuing alcoholism and infidelity involving Ruth Kligman.
She was also romantically involved with two prominent American artists of the mid-20th century, Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning.

Action painting

gestural abstractionaction paintergestural painting
Pollock's technique of pouring and dripping paint is thought to be one of the origins of the term action painting.
While abstract expressionists such as Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline and Willem de Kooning had long been outspoken in their view of a painting as an arena within which to come to terms with the act of creation, earlier critics sympathetic to their cause, like Clement Greenberg, focused on their works' "objectness."

Green River Cemetery

The couple are buried in Green River Cemetery in Springs with a large boulder marking his grave and a smaller one marking hers.
However, after Jackson Pollock was buried on a hill there in 1956, it became famous as the artists' and writers' cemetery.

Janet Sobel

[2]
One definitive influence on Pollock was the work of the Ukrainian American artist Janet Sobel (1894–1968) (born Jennie Lechovsky).
Even with an artistic career as brief as hers, Sobel is the first artist to use the drip painting technique which directly influenced Jackson Pollock.

Hans Namuth

In 1950, Hans Namuth, a young photographer, wanted to take pictures (both stills and moving) of Pollock at work.
Namuth specialized in portraiture, photographing many artists, including abstract expressionist Jackson Pollock.

Glen Rounds

In the early 1930s, Pollock spent a summer touring the Western United States together with Glen Rounds, a fellow art student, and Benton, their teacher.
During this formative period, he spent a summer touring the Western United States together with Jackson Pollock, a fellow art student, and Thomas Hart Benton, their teacher at the Art Students League.

Springs, New York

SpringsAccabonacSprings, East Hampton
In November, they moved out of the city to the Springs area of East Hampton on the south shore of Long Island.
Artists such as Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and John Ferren worked there.

All-over painting

all-overall overall-over" gestural canvases
In his essay "American-Type Painting," Greenberg noted those works were the first of all-over painting he had seen, and said, "Pollock admitted that these pictures had made an impression on him".
This concept is most popularly thought of as emerging in relation to the so-called "drip" paintings of Jackson Pollock and the "automatic writing" or "abstract calligraphy" of Mark Tobey in the 1950s, though the applicability of the term all-over painting would be wider than that.

Betty Parsons

Betty Parsons GalleryBetty ParsonBetty Parsons Art Gallery
These paintings have been referred to as his 'Black pourings' and when he exhibited them at the Betty Parsons Gallery in New York, none of them sold.
At a time when the market for avant-garde American art was minuscule, Parsons was the only dealer willing to represent artists like Jackson Pollock after Peggy Guggenheim closed her Art of This Century gallery and returned to Europe in 1947.

Thomas Hart Benton (painter)

Thomas Hart BentonThomas BentonBenton
In 1930, following his older brother Charles Pollock, he moved to New York City, where they both studied under Thomas Hart Benton at the Art Students League.
His most famous student, Jackson Pollock, whom he mentored in the Art Students League, founded the Abstract Expressionist movement.

Tony Smith (sculptor)

Tony SmithSmith, Tony
He did not paint at all in 1956, but was making sculptures at Tony Smith's home: constructions of wire, gauze, and plaster.
During the 1940s and 1950s Smith became close friends with Barnett Newman, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Clyfford Still.

Helen Frankenthaler

FrankenthalerFrankenthaler, HelenHelen (Frankenthaler)
Pollock's staining into raw canvas was adapted by the Color Field painters Helen Frankenthaler and Morris Louis.
Born in Manhattan, she was influenced by Greenberg, Hans Hofmann, and Jackson Pollock's paintings.

Canvas

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Pollock's work after 1951 was darker in color, including a collection painted in black on unprimed canvases.
Many artists have painted onto unprimed canvas, such as Jackson Pollock, Kenneth Noland, Francis Bacon, Helen Frankenthaler, Dan Christensen, Larry Zox, Ronnie Landfield, Color Field painters, Lyrical Abstractionists and others.

Color field

Color Field paintingcolour fieldcolor fields
Pollock's staining into raw canvas was adapted by the Color Field painters Helen Frankenthaler and Morris Louis.
Jackson Pollock, Adolph Gottlieb, Hans Hofmann, Barnett Newman, Clyfford Still, Mark Rothko, Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt and Arshile Gorky (in his last works) were among the prominent abstract expressionist painters that Greenberg identified as being connected to Color Field painting in the 1950s and 1960s.

Robert Coates (critic)

Robert CoatesRobert M. CoatesCoates, Robert M.
The critic Robert Coates once derided a number of Pollock's works as "mere unorganized explosions of random energy, and therefore meaningless."
He used the term "abstract expressionism" in 1946 in reference to the works of Hans Hofmann, Arshile Gorky, Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning and others.

East Hampton (town), New York

East HamptonEast Hampton, New YorkTown of East Hampton
In November, they moved out of the city to the Springs area of East Hampton on the south shore of Long Island.
East Hampton's reputation as an artists colony began with painter Jackson Pollock, who resided in Springs, New York in the 1940s and 1950s, with Lee Krasner, at what is now known as the Pollock-Krasner House and Studio.