Jacques Derrida

DerridaDerrida, JacquesDerrida, J.DerridanJacques Derrida's workthe poststructuralist philosopherthere is nothing outside the text
Jacques Derrida (born Jackie Élie Derrida; July 15, 1930 – October 9, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction, which he discussed in numerous texts, and developed in the context of phenomenology.wikipedia
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Deconstruction

deconstructdeconstructivedeconstructionist
Jacques Derrida (born Jackie Élie Derrida; July 15, 1930 – October 9, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction, which he discussed in numerous texts, and developed in the context of phenomenology.
Originated by the philosopher Jacques Derrida, deconstruction is an approach to understanding the relationship between text and meaning.

Deconstructivism

deconstructivistdeconstructionDeconstructivist architecture
He also influenced architecture (in the form of deconstructivism), music, art, and art criticism.
Its name comes from the idea of "Deconstruction", a form of semiotic analysis developed by the French philosopher Jacques Derrida.

Of Grammatology

De la grammatologie
Others cite Of Grammatology, Writing and Difference, and Margins of Philosophy.
Of Grammatology (De la grammatologie) is a 1967 book by French philosopher Jacques Derrida that has been called a foundational text for deconstructive criticism.

Writing and Difference

L'écriture et la différence
Others cite Of Grammatology, Writing and Difference, and Margins of Philosophy.
Writing and Difference (L'écriture et la différence) is a book by French philosopher Jacques Derrida, collecting some of the early lectures and essays that established his international fame.

Phenomenology (philosophy)

phenomenologyphenomenologicalphenomenologist
Jacques Derrida (born Jackie Élie Derrida; July 15, 1930 – October 9, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction, which he discussed in numerous texts, and developed in the context of phenomenology.
Husserl's conception of phenomenology has been criticized and developed not only by himself but also by students such as Edith Stein and Roman Ingarden, by hermeneutic philosophers such as Martin Heidegger, by existentialists such as Nicolai Hartmann, Gabriel Marcel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jean-Paul Sartre, and by other philosophers such as Max Scheler, Paul Ricoeur, Jean-Luc Marion, Michel Henry, Emmanuel Levinas, Jacques Derrida, and sociologists Alfred Schütz and Eric Voegelin.

Louis Althusser

AlthusserAlthusser, LouisAlthusserian
On his first day at ENS, Derrida met Louis Althusser, with whom he became friends.
According to his own memoirs, his Algerian childhood was prosperous; historian Martin Jay said that Althusser, along with Albert Camus and Jacques Derrida, was "a product of the French colonial culture in Northern Africa."

Post-structuralism

post-structuralistpoststructuralistpoststructuralism
He is one of the major figures associated with post-structuralism and postmodern philosophy.
Writers whose works are often characterised as post-structuralist include: Roland Barthes, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Judith Butler, Jean Baudrillard, Julia Kristeva, and Jürgen Habermas, as well as others from the Frankfurt Schools, although many theorists who have been called "post-structuralist" have rejected the label.

École normale supérieure (Paris)

École Normale SupérieureÉcole NormaleENS
At that time he prepared for his entrance exam to the prestigious École Normale Supérieure (ENS); after failing the exam on his first try, he passed it on the second, and was admitted in 1952.
The school has achieved particular recognition in the fields of mathematics and physics as one of France's foremost scientific training grounds, along with notability in the human sciences as the spiritual birthplace of authors such as Julien Gracq, Jean Giraudoux, Assia Djebar, and Charles Péguy, philosophers such as Henri Bergson, Jean-Paul Sartre, Louis Althusser, Simone Weil, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Alain Badiou, social scientists such as Émile Durkheim, Raymond Aron, and Pierre Bourdieu, and "French theorists" such as Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.

Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences

Structure, Sign, and PlaybricolageStructure, Sign and Play
With "Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences", his contribution to a 1966 colloquium on structuralism at Johns Hopkins University, his work began to gain international prominence.
Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences (La structure, le signe et le jeu dans le discours des sciences humaines) was a lecture presented at Johns Hopkins University on 21 October 1966 by philosopher Jacques Derrida.

Lycée Louis-le-Grand

Louis-le-GrandCollège Louis-le-GrandCollège de Clermont
In the late 1940s, he attended the, in Algiers; in 1949 he moved to Paris, attending the Lycée Louis-le-Grand, where his professor of philosophy was Étienne Borne.
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.

Paul de Man

de Man, Paulde ManPaul M. de Man
At the same colloquium Derrida would meet Jacques Lacan and Paul de Man, the latter an important interlocutor in the years to come.
Along with Jacques Derrida, he was part of an influential critical movement that went beyond traditional interpretation of literary texts to reflect on the epistemological difficulties inherent in any textual, literary, or critical activity.

Gaston Bachelard

BachelardBachelard amphitheatreBachelard, Gaston
Following the war, from 1960 to 1964, Derrida taught philosophy at the Sorbonne, where he was an assistant of Suzanne Bachelard (daughter of Gaston), Georges Canguilhem, Paul Ricœur (who in these years coined the term school of suspicion) and Jean Wahl.
To the latter he introduced the concepts of epistemological obstacle and epistemological break (obstacle épistémologique and rupture épistémologique). He influenced many subsequent French philosophers, among them Michel Foucault, Louis Althusser, Dominique Lecourt and Jacques Derrida, as well as the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu.

Speech and Phenomena

La voix et le phénomène: introduction au problème du signe dans la phénoménologie de Husserl
Some critics consider Speech and Phenomena (1967) to be his most important work.
Speech and Phenomena: And Other Essays on Husserl's Theory of Signs, or Voice and Phenomenon: Introduction to the Problem of the Sign in Husserl's Phenomenology, (La Voix et le Phénomène) is a book about the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl by French philosopher Jacques Derrida, published in 1967 alongside Derrida's Of Grammatology and Writing and Difference.

Continental philosophy

Continentalcontinental philosophercontinental philosophers
His work retains major academic influence throughout continental Europe, South America and all other countries where "continental philosophy" has been predominant, particularly in debates around ontology, epistemology (especially concerning social sciences), ethics, aesthetics, hermeneutics, and the philosophy of language.
A final characteristic trait of continental philosophy is an emphasis on metaphilosophy. In the wake of the development and success of the natural sciences, continental philosophers have often sought to redefine the method and nature of philosophy. In some cases (such as German idealism or phenomenology), this manifests as a renovation of the traditional view that philosophy is the first, foundational, a priori science. In other cases (such as hermeneutics, critical theory, or structuralism), it is held that philosophy investigates a domain that is irreducibly cultural or practical. And some continental philosophers (such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, the later Heidegger, or Derrida) doubt whether any conception of philosophy can coherently achieve its stated goals.

Hermeneutics

hermeneutichermeneuticalhermeneutically
His work retains major academic influence throughout continental Europe, South America and all other countries where "continental philosophy" has been predominant, particularly in debates around ontology, epistemology (especially concerning social sciences), ethics, aesthetics, hermeneutics, and the philosophy of language.
19th- and 20th-century hermeneutics emerged as a theory of understanding (Verstehen) through the work of Friedrich Schleiermacher (Romantic hermeneutics and methodological hermeneutics), August Böckh (methodological hermeneutics), Wilhelm Dilthey (epistemological hermeneutics), Martin Heidegger (ontological hermeneutics, hermeneutic phenomenology, and transcendental hermeneutic phenomenology), Hans-Georg Gadamer (ontological hermeneutics), Leo Strauss (Straussian hermeneutics), Paul Ricœur (hermeneutic phenomenology), Walter Benjamin (Marxist hermeneutics), Ernst Bloch (Marxist hermeneutics), Jacques Derrida (radical hermeneutics, namely deconstruction), Richard Kearney (diacritical hermeneutics), Fredric Jameson (Marxist hermeneutics), and John Thompson (critical hermeneutics).

Marguerite Aucouturier

In June 1957, he married the psychoanalyst Marguerite Aucouturier in Boston.
Marguerite Derrida (née Aucouturier) is a French psychoanalyst and the wife of philosopher Jacques Derrida from 1957 until his death in 2004.

Structuralism

structuraliststructuralstructuralists
With "Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences", his contribution to a 1966 colloquium on structuralism at Johns Hopkins University, his work began to gain international prominence.
However, by the late 1960s, many of structuralism's basic tenets came under attack from a new wave of predominantly French intellectuals such as the philosopher and historian Michel Foucault, the philosopher Jacques Derrida, the Marxist philosopher Louis Althusser, and the literary critic Roland Barthes.

Postmodern philosophy

postmodernpostmodernismpostmodern theory
He is one of the major figures associated with post-structuralism and postmodern philosophy.
Jacques Derrida, who is generally identified as a postmodernist, stated that "every referent, all reality has the structure of a differential trace".

Pierre Alféri

Pierre
His wife, Marguerite, gave birth to their first child, Pierre, in 1963.
Alféri is the son of the French philosopher Jacques Derrida and psychoanalyst Marguerite Aucouturier.

Collège international de philosophie

International College of Philosophy
With François Châtelet and others he in 1983 co-founded the Collège international de philosophie (CIPH), an institution intended to provide a location for philosophical research which could not be carried out elsewhere in the academia.
It was co-founded in 1983 by Jacques Derrida, François Châtelet, Jean-Pierre Faye and Dominique Lecourt in an attempt to re-think the teaching of philosophy in France, and to liberate it from any institutional authority (most of all from the University).

School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences

École des hautes études en sciences socialesEHESSÉcole pratique des Hautes Études
Derrida became full professor (directeur d'études) at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris from 1984 (he had been elected at the end of 1983).
The institution is concentrated on scholarly research and some of its faculty (known as "directeurs d'études") have achieved international recognition in different areas: economics, Thomas Piketty and Nobel Prize Jean Tirole; historians such as Fernand Braudel and Lucien Febvre; anthropologists such as Claude Levi-Strauss, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro and Marcel Mauss, sociologists such as Pierre Bourdieu, Edgar Morin and Alain Touraine; philosophers such as Jacques Derrida, and interdisciplinary scholars such as Marcel Mauss and Raymond Aron.

El Biar

Derrida was born on July 15, 1930, in a summer home in El Biar (Algiers), Algeria, into a Sephardic Jewish family (originally from Toledo) that became French in 1870 when the Crémieux Decree granted full French citizenship to the indigenous Arabic-speaking Jews of Algeria.
Jacques Derrida, philosopher

Safaa Fathy

Late in his life, Derrida participated in making two biographical documentaries, D'ailleurs, Derrida (Derrida's Elsewhere) by Safaa Fathy (1999), and Derrida by Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering Kofman (2002).
She is best known for her film Derrida's Elsewhere, a documentary which focuses on the life and concepts of controversial philosopher Jacques Derrida.

Ghost Dance (film)

Ghost DanceGhost Dance'' (film)
In 1983 Derrida collaborated with Ken McMullen on the film Ghost Dance.
The film focuses on philosopher Jacques Derrida who considers ghosts to be the memory of something which has never been present.

Paul Ricœur

Paul RicoeurRicoeurRicoeur, Paul
Following the war, from 1960 to 1964, Derrida taught philosophy at the Sorbonne, where he was an assistant of Suzanne Bachelard (daughter of Gaston), Georges Canguilhem, Paul Ricœur (who in these years coined the term school of suspicion) and Jean Wahl.
Jacques Derrida was an assistant to Ricœur during that time (early 1960s).