Jaffa

JoppaYafoJaffa, IsraelIoppeJaphoKhurbet HadrahOld JaffaTreaty of Jaffa16,000history
Jaffa, in Hebrew Yafo and in Arabic Yafa and also called Japho or Joppa, the southern and oldest part of Tel Aviv–Yafo, is an ancient port city in Israel.wikipedia
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Tel Aviv

Tel-AvivTel Aviv, IsraelTel Aviv-Yafo
Jaffa, in Hebrew Yafo and in Arabic Yafa and also called Japho or Joppa, the southern and oldest part of Tel Aviv–Yafo, is an ancient port city in Israel.
The city was founded in 1909 by the Yishuv (Jewish residents) as a modern housing estate on the outskirts of the ancient port city of Jaffa, then part of the Jerusalem province of Ottoman Syria.

Jaffa orange

JaffaJaffa orangesoranges
Jaffa is famous for its association with the biblical stories of Jonah, Solomon and Saint Peter as well as the mythological story of Andromeda and Perseus, and later for its oranges.
Developed by Ottoman farmers in the mid-19th century, the variety takes its name from the city of Jaffa where it was first produced for export.

Jonah

Jonah and the WhaleYunusJonas
Jaffa is famous for its association with the biblical stories of Jonah, Solomon and Saint Peter as well as the mythological story of Andromeda and Perseus, and later for its oranges. Jaffa is mentioned four times in the Hebrew Bible, as a city opposite the territory given to the Hebrew Tribe of Dan, as port-of-entry for the cedars of Lebanon for Solomon's Temple, as the place whence the prophet Jonah embarked for Tarshish and again as port-of-entry for the cedars of Lebanon for the Second Temple of Jerusalem.
Jonah is the central character in the Book of Jonah, in which God commands him to go to the city of Nineveh to prophesy against it "for their great wickedness is come up before me," but Jonah instead attempts to flee from "the presence of the Lord" by going to Jaffa (sometimes transliterated as Joppa or Joppe), and sailing to Tarshish.

The Taking of Joppa

The Conquest of Joppa
The so-called story of the Taking of Joppa glorifies its conquest by Pharaoh Thutmose III, whose general, Djehuty hid Egyptian soldiers in sacks carried by pack animals and sent them camouflaged as tribute into the Canaanite city, where the soldiers emerged and conquered it.
The Taking of Joppa is an ancient Egyptian tale describing the conquest of the Canaanite town of Yapu (Joppa) by Thutmose III's general Djehuty.

Canaan

CanaanitesCanaaniteLand of Canaan
The so-called story of the Taking of Joppa glorifies its conquest by Pharaoh Thutmose III, whose general, Djehuty hid Egyptian soldiers in sacks carried by pack animals and sent them camouflaged as tribute into the Canaanite city, where the soldiers emerged and conquered it.
They also built cities that still stand such as Sidon, Acre or Akka, Baalbek, Beirut, Byblos, Latakia, Ashkelon, Tyre, Tartus, Hebron, Jericho, Haifa, Jaffa, Tangier, Tripoli, Palermo, Cagliari, Lisbon, Cadiz, Malaga, and Ibiza.

Andromeda (mythology)

AndromedaPerseus and AndromedaBoast of Cassiopeia
Jaffa is famous for its association with the biblical stories of Jonah, Solomon and Saint Peter as well as the mythological story of Andromeda and Perseus, and later for its oranges. The Hellenist tradition links the name to Iopeia, or Cassiopeia, mother of Andromeda.
At the port city of Jaffa (today part of Tel Aviv) an outcrop of rocks near the harbor has been associated with the place of Andromeda's chaining and rescue by the traveler Pausanias, the geographer Strabo and the historian of the Jews Josephus.

Dorcas

TabithaDouglas Dorcas SocietySt Dorcas
The New Testament account of Saint Peter bringing back to life the widow Dorcas (recorded in Acts of the Apostles, takes place in Jaffa, then called in Greek Ἰόππη (Latinized as Joppa).
Dorcas (Δορκάς, Dorkás; טביתא Ṭabītā) was a disciple who lived in Joppa, referenced in the Acts of the Apostles in the New Testament.

Djehuty (general)

DjehutyGeneral Djehuty
The so-called story of the Taking of Joppa glorifies its conquest by Pharaoh Thutmose III, whose general, Djehuty hid Egyptian soldiers in sacks carried by pack animals and sent them camouflaged as tribute into the Canaanite city, where the soldiers emerged and conquered it.
His undisturbed burial was found in 1824 at Saqqara and he is the main personality in the Egyptian story of The Taking of Joppa (today Jaffa).

First Jewish–Roman War

First Jewish-Roman WarGreat Jewish RevoltJewish Revolt
During the First Jewish–Roman War, Jaffa was captured and burned by Cestius Gallus.
Despite initial advances and the conquest of Jaffa, the Syrian Legion was ambushed and defeated by Jewish rebels at the Battle of Beth Horon with 6,000 Romans massacred and the Legion's aquila lost.

Gush Dan

Tel Aviv Metropolitan AreaTel Aviv areaTel Aviv-Yafo
Jaffa is mentioned in the Book of Joshua as the territorial border of the Tribe of Dan, hence the modern term "Gush Dan" for the center of the coastal plain.
The region they attempted to settle included the area as far north as Joppa and as far south as Shephelah in the area of Timnah.

Tribe of Dan

DanDaniteCamp of Dan
Jaffa is mentioned in the Book of Joshua as the territorial border of the Tribe of Dan, hence the modern term "Gush Dan" for the center of the coastal plain. Jaffa is mentioned four times in the Hebrew Bible, as a city opposite the territory given to the Hebrew Tribe of Dan, as port-of-entry for the cedars of Lebanon for Solomon's Temple, as the place whence the prophet Jonah embarked for Tarshish and again as port-of-entry for the cedars of Lebanon for the Second Temple of Jerusalem.
To the north the territory of Dan abutted Joppa, the modern Jaffa.

Cassiopeia (mother of Andromeda)

CassiopeiaCassiopeCassiopea
The Hellenist tradition links the name to Iopeia, or Cassiopeia, mother of Andromeda.
While according to Stephanus, she was called Iope, the daughter of Aeolus, from whom the town of Joppa (Now the Jaffa neighborhood in Tel Aviv) derived its name.

Tarshish

Tar-TarnishTharsis
Jaffa is mentioned four times in the Hebrew Bible, as a city opposite the territory given to the Hebrew Tribe of Dan, as port-of-entry for the cedars of Lebanon for Solomon's Temple, as the place whence the prophet Jonah embarked for Tarshish and again as port-of-entry for the cedars of Lebanon for the Second Temple of Jerusalem.
* Jonah 1:3, 4:2 mentions Tarshish as a distant place: "But Jonah rose to flee to Tarshish from the presence of the Lord. He went down to Joppa and found a ship going to Tarshish."

Ramla

RamleRamlehRamlah
Under Islamic rule, it served as a port of Ramla, then the provincial capital.
Ramla lies along the route of the Via Maris, connecting old Cairo (Fustat) with Damascus, at its intersection with the road connecting the port of Jaffa with Jerusalem.

County of Jaffa and Ascalon

Count of JaffaCount of Jaffa and AscalonCounty of Jaffa
Jaffa was captured in June 1099 during the First Crusade, and was the centre of the County of Jaffa and Ascalon, one of the vassals of the Kingdom of Jerusalem.
Jaffa was fortified by Godfrey of Bouillon after the First Crusade in 1100, and was unsuccessfully claimed by Daimbert of Pisa, the first Patriarch.

Battle of Arsuf

defeated
The city surrendered to King Richard the Lionheart on 10 September 1191, three days after the Battle of Arsuf.
The battle took place just outside of Arsuf (Arsur), where Saladin attacked Richard's army as it was moving from Acre to Jaffa.

Tyre, Lebanon

TyreTyrianTyrians
After Canaanite and Philistine dominion, King David and his son King Solomon conquered Jaffa and used its port to bring the cedars used in the construction of the First Temple from Tyre.
Many stones were taken to neighbouring cities like Sidon, Acre, Beirut, and Jaffa as building materials.

Cornelius the Centurion

CorneliusCenturion CorneliusConversion of Cornelius
relates that, while Peter was in Jaffa, he had a vision of a large sheet filled with "clean" and "unclean" animals being lowered from heaven, together with a message from the Holy Spirit telling him to accompany several messengers to Cornelius in Caesarea Maritima.
The angel then instructs Cornelius to send the men of his household to Joppa, where they will find Simon Peter, who is residing with a tanner by the name of Simon (ff).

Muhammad Abu Nabbut

Muhammad Abu-NabbutMuhammed Aby Nabbut
The governor who was appointed after these devastating events, Muhammad Abu-Nabbut, commenced wide-ranging building and restoration work in Jaffa, including the Mahmoudiya Mosque and Sabil Abu Nabbut.
Muhammad (Mehmet) Abu Nabbut Agha was the governor of Jaffa and Gaza in the early 19th century on behalf of the Ottoman Empire, from 1807 to 1818, as well as the governor of Thessaloniki from 1819 to 1827 during the Greek War of Independence.

Kingdom of Jerusalem

JerusalemKing of JerusalemCrusader
One of its counts, John of Ibelin, wrote the principal book of the Assizes of the Kingdom of Jerusalem.
Godfrey did indeed increase the boundaries of the kingdom, by capturing Jaffa, Haifa, Tiberias, and other cities, and reducing many others to tributary status.

Peasants' revolt in Palestine

1834 Arab revolt in PalestinePeasants' Revolt1834 peasants' revolt
During the 1834 Peasants' revolt in Palestine, Jaffa was besieged for forty days by "mountaineers" in revolt against Ibrahim Pasha of Egypt.
Encouraged by rural sheikh Qasim al-Ahmad, the urban notables of Nablus, Hebron and the Jerusalem-Jaffa area did not carry out Ibrahim Pasha's orders to conscript, disarm and tax the local peasantry.

Mahmoudiya Mosque

Great Mosque
The governor who was appointed after these devastating events, Muhammad Abu-Nabbut, commenced wide-ranging building and restoration work in Jaffa, including the Mahmoudiya Mosque and Sabil Abu Nabbut.
The Mahmoudiya Mosque is the largest and most significant mosque in Jaffa, now part of the larger city of Tel Aviv.

Siege of Jaffa

Jaffa1799 campaignattack on Jaffa
On 7 March 1799 Napoleon captured the town in what became known as the Siege of Jaffa, ransacked it, and killed scores of local inhabitants as a reaction to his envoys being brutally killed when delivering an ultimatum of surrender.
The Siege of Jaffa was fought from 3 to 7 March 1799 between France and the Ottoman Empire.

Hasmonean dynasty

HasmoneanHasmoneansHasmonean Kingdom
It later became a port city of the Seleucid Empire until it was taken over by the Maccabees and ruled by the Hasmonean dynasty.
Jonathan and Simeon led a force of 10,000 men against Apollonius' forces in Jaffa, which was unprepared for the rapid attack and opened the gates in surrender to the Jewish forces.

1921 Jaffa riots

Jaffa riots19211921 Palestine riots
The Jaffa riots in 1921, (known in Hebrew as Meoraot Tarpa) began with a May Day parade that turned violent.
The Jaffa riots (commonly known in מאורעות תרפ"א) was a series of violent riots in Mandatory Palestine on May 1–7, 1921, which began as a fight between two Jewish groups but developed into an attack by Arabs on Jews during which many were killed. The rioting began in Jaffa and spread to other parts of the country. The riot resulted in the deaths of 47 Jews and 48 Arabs. Another 146 Jews and 73 Arabs were wounded.