Jah

Yah-iahGodLordYah(weh)
Jah or Yah (, Yah) is a short form of Yahweh (in consonantal spelling YHWH, called the Tetragrammaton), the proper name of God in the Hebrew Bible.wikipedia
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Rastafari

RastafarianRastaRastafarians
In an English-language context, the name Jah is now most commonly associated with the Rastafari.
Central is a monotheistic belief in a single God—referred to as Jah—who partially resides within each individual.

Names of God in Judaism

GodHashemnames of God
Jah or Yah (, Yah) is a short form of Yahweh (in consonantal spelling YHWH, called the Tetragrammaton), the proper name of God in the Hebrew Bible.
Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH and six others which can be categorized as titles are El ("God"), Eloah ("God"), Elohim ("Gods"), Shaddai (“Almighty"), Ehyeh (“I Will Be”), and Tzevaot ("[of] Hosts"). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God, but chumrah sometimes dictates special care such as the writing of "G-d" instead of "God" in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (undefined, lit. "9-6") instead of Yōd-Hē (undefined, lit. "10-5" but also "Jah") for the number fifteen in Hebrew.

Hallelujah

AllelujaHallelujaAlleluia
This short form of the name occurs 50 times in the text of the Hebrew Bible, of which 24 form part of the phrase "Hallelujah", which is actually a two-word phrase, not one word. The short form Jah/Yah, which appears in Exodus 15:2 and 17:16, Psalm 89:9, Song of Songs 8:6, is preserved also in theophoric names such as Elijah ("my god is Jah"), Malchijah ("my king is Jah"), and (Adonijah) "my lord is Jah", etc. as well as in the phrase Hallelujah. At Revelation 19:1-6, Jah—a contraction of the name Yahweh—is embedded in the phrase "hallelujah" (Tiberian halləlûyāh), a Hebrew expression that literally means "Praise Jah".
It is a transliteration of the Hebrew word הַלְלוּיָהּ (Modern Hebrew haleluya, Tiberian haləlûyāh), which is composed of two elements: הַלְלוּ (second-person imperative masculine plural form of the Hebrew verb hillel: an exhortation to "praise" addressed to several people ) and יָהּ (the name of God Jah or Yah).

Theophory in the Bible

List of names referring to Eltheophorynames
It is otherwise mostly limited to the phrase Hallelujah and theophoric names such as Elijah. The short form Jah/Yah, which appears in Exodus 15:2 and 17:16, Psalm 89:9, Song of Songs 8:6, is preserved also in theophoric names such as Elijah ("my god is Jah"), Malchijah ("my king is Jah"), and (Adonijah) "my lord is Jah", etc. as well as in the phrase Hallelujah.
Elijah (Elias) – Whose God is Jah, God Jah, The Strong Jah, God of Jah, My God is Jah. Reference to the meaning of both (Eli)-(Jah)

Adonijah

Adonijafourth son of King David
The short form Jah/Yah, which appears in Exodus 15:2 and 17:16, Psalm 89:9, Song of Songs 8:6, is preserved also in theophoric names such as Elijah ("my god is Jah"), Malchijah ("my king is Jah"), and (Adonijah) "my lord is Jah", etc. as well as in the phrase Hallelujah.
According to 2 Samuel, Adonijah (’Ǎḏōnîyāh, "Yah is my lord") was the fourth son of King David.

Haile Selassie

Haile Selassie IEmperor Haile SelassieRas Tafari Makonnen
Rastafari use the terms "Jah" or sometimes "Jah Jah" as a term for the Lord God of Israel and/or Haile Selassie, who some Rastafarians regard as the incarnation of The God of the Old Testament or as the reincarnation of Jesus Christ who is also known by the title Janhoy.
The Rastafari movement employs many of these appellations, also referring to him as Jah, Jah Jah, Jah Rastafari (the abbreviation of "His Imperial Majesty").

Tetragrammaton

YHWHGodYahweh
Jah or Yah (, Yah) is a short form of Yahweh (in consonantal spelling YHWH, called the Tetragrammaton), the proper name of God in the Hebrew Bible.
Short form Jah occurs 50 times: 43 times in the Psalms, one in Exodus 15:2; 17:16; Isaiah 12:2; 26:4, and twice in Isaiah 38:11.

Yahweh

GodYahGod of Israel
Jah or Yah (, Yah) is a short form of Yahweh (in consonantal spelling YHWH, called the Tetragrammaton), the proper name of God in the Hebrew Bible. At Revelation 19:1-6, Jah—a contraction of the name Yahweh—is embedded in the phrase "hallelujah" (Tiberian halləlûyāh), a Hebrew expression that literally means "Praise Jah".
Jah, a short form of the name

Reggae

reggae musicisland vibeJamaican reggae
Jah is referenced in many reggae songs.
There are many artists who utilize religious themes in their music — whether it be discussing a specific religious topic, or simply giving praise to God (Jah).

Bad Brains

Livepioneering hardcore bandThe Bad Brains
Hardcore punk/reggae band Bad Brains' first album contains the songs "Jah Calling" and "I Luv I Jah".
At first it was unclear if H.R. was no longer a member of Bad Brains, but when asked if he would work with him again, guitarist Dr. Know replied, "Only Jah know."

God in Judaism

GodGod of IsraelGod of the Jews
Jah or Yah (, Yah) is a short form of Yahweh (in consonantal spelling YHWH, called the Tetragrammaton), the proper name of God in the Hebrew Bible.

Hebrew Bible

biblicalBibleHebrew
Jah or Yah (, Yah) is a short form of Yahweh (in consonantal spelling YHWH, called the Tetragrammaton), the proper name of God in the Hebrew Bible.

Elijah

Prophet ElijahEliasSaint Elijah
It is otherwise mostly limited to the phrase Hallelujah and theophoric names such as Elijah. The short form Jah/Yah, which appears in Exodus 15:2 and 17:16, Psalm 89:9, Song of Songs 8:6, is preserved also in theophoric names such as Elijah ("my god is Jah"), Malchijah ("my king is Jah"), and (Adonijah) "my lord is Jah", etc. as well as in the phrase Hallelujah.

King James Version

King James BibleKJVKing James
In the King James Version (1611) there is only a single instance of JAH (capitalised), in Psalm 68:4. In the King James Version of the Christian Bible, the Hebrew יהּ is transliterated as "JAH" (capitalised) in only one instance: "Sing unto God, sing praises to his name: extol him that rideth upon the heavens by his name JAH, and rejoice before him".

Psalm 68

68Psalm 67 (Hebrew numbering 68)Psalm 68:1–2
In the King James Version (1611) there is only a single instance of JAH (capitalised), in Psalm 68:4.

An American Translation

The New Testament: an American Translation
An American Translation (1939) follows KJV in using Yah in this verse.

J

jotSee belowthe widespread adoption of the letter 'J
The conventional English pronunciation of Jah is, even though the letter J here transliterates the palatal approximant (Hebrew י Yodh).

Palatal approximant

jyod/j/
The conventional English pronunciation of Jah is, even though the letter J here transliterates the palatal approximant (Hebrew י Yodh).

Yodh

Yudyodي
The conventional English pronunciation of Jah is, even though the letter J here transliterates the palatal approximant (Hebrew י Yodh).

Romanization of Hebrew

translit.transliteratedtr.
The spelling Yah is designed to make the pronunciation explicit in an English-language context (see also romanization of Hebrew).

Malchijah

Malchiah
The short form Jah/Yah, which appears in Exodus 15:2 and 17:16, Psalm 89:9, Song of Songs 8:6, is preserved also in theophoric names such as Elijah ("my god is Jah"), Malchijah ("my king is Jah"), and (Adonijah) "my lord is Jah", etc. as well as in the phrase Hallelujah.

Ethiopian aristocratic and court titles

RasDejazmachLij
Rastafari use the terms "Jah" or sometimes "Jah Jah" as a term for the Lord God of Israel and/or Haile Selassie, who some Rastafarians regard as the incarnation of The God of the Old Testament or as the reincarnation of Jesus Christ who is also known by the title Janhoy.

Tiberian Hebrew

TiberianT.H.Tib.
At Revelation 19:1-6, Jah—a contraction of the name Yahweh—is embedded in the phrase "hallelujah" (Tiberian halləlûyāh), a Hebrew expression that literally means "Praise Jah".

Bible

biblicalScripturethe Bible
In the King James Version of the Christian Bible, the Hebrew יהּ is transliterated as "JAH" (capitalised) in only one instance: "Sing unto God, sing praises to his name: extol him that rideth upon the heavens by his name JAH, and rejoice before him".

Reformation

Protestantthe ReformationProtestants
With the rise of the Reformation, reconstructions of the Tetragrammaton became popular.