Jainism

JainJainsJainaJain religionGujarati JainJain faithJainasJain familyJain monkJainist
Jainism, traditionally known as Jain Dharma, is an ancient Indian religion.wikipedia
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Indian religions

Dharmic religionsIndian religionreligion
Jainism, traditionally known as Jain Dharma, is an ancient Indian religion.
Indian religions, sometimes also termed Dharmic religions, are the religions that originated in the Indian subcontinent; namely Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism.

Tirthankara

TirthankarTirthankarasTirthankars
Jainism is a transtheistic religion, and Jains trace their spiritual ideas and history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviours and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who according to Jain tradition lived millions of years ago, the twenty-third being Parshvanatha in 900 BCE, and the twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra around 500 BCE.
In Jainism, a tirthankara (Sanskrit: ; English: literally a 'ford-maker') is a saviour and spiritual teacher of the dharma (righteous path).

Rishabhanatha

RishabhaAdinathAdinatha
Jainism is a transtheistic religion, and Jains trace their spiritual ideas and history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviours and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who according to Jain tradition lived millions of years ago, the twenty-third being Parshvanatha in 900 BCE, and the twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra around 500 BCE. Out of the 24 Tirthankaras, Jain devotional worship is predominantly addressed to four: Mahāvīra, Parshvanatha, Neminatha and Rishabhanatha.
Rishabhanatha (also ', Rishabhadeva, or ') is the first Tirthankara (ford maker and propagator of Dharma) of Jainism and the founder of Ikshvaku dynasty.

Mahavira

MahavirMahāvīraMahaveer
Jainism is a transtheistic religion, and Jains trace their spiritual ideas and history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviours and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who according to Jain tradition lived millions of years ago, the twenty-third being Parshvanatha in 900 BCE, and the twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra around 500 BCE.
Mahavira, also known as Vardhamana, was the twenty-fourth tirthankara (ford-maker and propagator of dharma) in Jainism who revived and reorganized the religion.

Parshvanatha

ParshvaParshvanathParshwanath
Jainism is a transtheistic religion, and Jains trace their spiritual ideas and history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviours and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who according to Jain tradition lived millions of years ago, the twenty-third being Parshvanatha in 900 BCE, and the twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra around 500 BCE. Out of the 24 Tirthankaras, Jain devotional worship is predominantly addressed to four: Mahāvīra, Parshvanatha, Neminatha and Rishabhanatha.
Parshvanatha, also known as Parshva and Paras, was the 23rd of 24 tirthankaras (ford-makers or propagators of dharma) of Jainism.

Anekantavada

SyādvādaanekantaSyadvada
The main religious premises of Jainism are ahiṃsā (non-violence), anekāntavāda (many-sidedness), aparigraha (non-attachment) and asceticism.
(अनेकान्तवाद, "many-sidedness") refers to the Jain doctrine about metaphysical truths that emerged in ancient India.

Jain cosmology

cosmologypresent cosmic ageAvsarpini
Jains believe that Jainism is an eternal dharma with the tirthankaras guiding every cycle of the Jain cosmology.
Jain cosmology is the description of the shape and functioning of the Universe (loka) and its constituents (such as living beings, matter, space, time etc.) according to Jainism.

Asceticism

asceticasceticsascetical
The main religious premises of Jainism are ahiṃsā (non-violence), anekāntavāda (many-sidedness), aparigraha (non-attachment) and asceticism.
Asceticism has been historically observed in many religious traditions, including Buddhism, Jainism, Hinduism, Christianity, and Judaism.

Aparigraha

absence of desiresAparigraha''' (virtue)less greedy
The main religious premises of Jainism are ahiṃsā (non-violence), anekāntavāda (many-sidedness), aparigraha (non-attachment) and asceticism.
In Hinduism and Jainism, aparigraha is the virtue of non-possessiveness, non-grasping or non-greediness.

Jainism in India

JainismJainsIndia
Jainism has between four and five million followers, with most Jains residing in India.
Jainism is India's sixth-largest religion and is practiced throughout India.

Śvētāmbara

SvetambaraShvetambaraShwetambar
Jainism has two major ancient sub-traditions, Digambaras and Śvētāmbaras; several smaller sub-traditions emerged in the 2nd millennium CE.
The Śvētāmbara (श्वेतांबर or श्वेतपट śvētapaṭa; also spelled Svetambar, Shvetambara or Swetambar) is one of the two main branches of Jainism, the other being the Digambara.

Śrāvaka (Jainism)

ŚrāvakaśrāvakasAnuvrata
Jain mendicants are found in all Jain sub-traditions except Kanji Panth sub-tradition, with laypersons (śrāvakas) supporting the mendicants' spiritual pursuits with resources.
In Jainism, the word Śrāvaka or Sāvaga (from Jain Prakrit) is used to refer the Jain laity (householder).

Ahimsa in Jainism

ahimsaahiṃsānon-violence
The main religious premises of Jainism are ahiṃsā (non-violence), anekāntavāda (many-sidedness), aparigraha (non-attachment) and asceticism.
Ahinsā (', alternatively spelled 'ahinsa', Sanskrit: अहिंसा IAST: ', Pāli: ) in Jainism is a fundamental principle forming the cornerstone of its ethics and doctrine.

Transtheism

transtheistictranscendent theismTranstheism''' (attribution)
Jainism is a transtheistic religion, and Jains trace their spiritual ideas and history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviours and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who according to Jain tradition lived millions of years ago, the twenty-third being Parshvanatha in 900 BCE, and the twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra around 500 BCE.
Zimmer applies the term to Jainism, which is theistic in the limited sense that gods exist but are irrelevant as they are transcended by moksha (that is, a system which is not non-theistic, but in which the gods are not the highest spiritual instance).

Jainism in the United Kingdom

United KingdomInstitute of JainologyJain Centre Leicester
Outside India, some of the largest Jain communities are present in Canada, Europe, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Suriname, Fiji, and the United States.
Adherents of Jainism first arrived in the United Kingdom (UK) in the 19th century.

Paryushana

ParyushanParyusanaDas Lakshana
Major Jain festivals include Paryushana and Daslakshana, Ashtanika, Mahavir Janma Kalyanak, and Dipawali.
Paryushana is the most important annual holy event for Jains and is usually celebrated in August or September in Hindi calendar Bhadrapad Month's Shukla Paksha.

Jainism in the United States

Jainism in AmericaAmerican JainismAmerican Jain unity
Outside India, some of the largest Jain communities are present in Canada, Europe, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Suriname, Fiji, and the United States.
Adherents of Jainism first arrived in the United States in the 20th century.

Mahavir Jayanti

Mahaveer Janam KalyanakMahavir Janma KalyanakMahavir Janma Kalyanaka
Major Jain festivals include Paryushana and Daslakshana, Ashtanika, Mahavir Janma Kalyanak, and Dipawali.
Mahaveer Janma Kalyanak, is one of the most important religious festivals for Jains.

Karma in Jainism

karmakarmasJainism
Causing injury to any being in any form creates bad karma which affects one's rebirth, future well being and suffering.
Karma is the basic principle within an overarching psycho-cosmology in Jainism.

Jainism in Canada

CanadaJainJains
Outside India, some of the largest Jain communities are present in Canada, Europe, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Suriname, Fiji, and the United States.
Adherents of Jainism first settled in Canada in small numbers in the late 19th century.

Diwali (Jainism)

DiwaliDipawaliDipawali (Jainism)
Major Jain festivals include Paryushana and Daslakshana, Ashtanika, Mahavir Janma Kalyanak, and Dipawali.
Diwali has a very special significance in Jainism.

Jain vegetarianism

Jain (Satvika)Jain foodJains
The practice of non-violence towards all living beings has led to Jain culture being vegetarian.
Jain vegetarianism is practiced by the followers of Jain culture and philosophy.

Padmanabh Jaini

Professor Padmanabh S Jaini
According to Padmanabh Jaini, Sāmāyika is a practice of "brief periods in meditation" in Jainism that is a part of siksavrata (ritual restraint).
Padmanabh Shrivarma Jaini is an Indian born scholar of Jainism and Buddhism, currently living in Berkeley, California, United States.

Historical Vedic religion

BrahmanismVedicVedic religion
The idea of reverence for non-violence (ahiṃsā) is founded in Hindu and Buddhist canonical texts, and it may have origins in more ancient Brahmanical Vedic thoughts.
Both of these traditions impacted Indic religions such as Buddhism and Jainism, and in particular Hinduism.

Neminatha

NeminathArishtanemiNeminātha
Out of the 24 Tirthankaras, Jain devotional worship is predominantly addressed to four: Mahāvīra, Parshvanatha, Neminatha and Rishabhanatha.
Neminatha is the twenty-second Tirthankara (ford-maker) in Jainism.