A report on JainismSanskrit and Mahavira

The hand symbolizes Ahiṃsā, the wheel dharmachakra, the resolve to halt saṃsāra (transmigration).
Rigveda (padapatha) manuscript in Devanagari, early 19th century. The red horizontal and vertical lines mark low and high pitch changes for chanting.
Statue of Mahavira meditating in the lotus position at Shri Mahavirji, Rajasthan, India.
Classification of Saṃsāri Jīvas (transmigrating souls) in Jainism
A 17th-century birch bark manuscript of Pāṇini's grammar treatise from Kashmir
Mahavira in Padmasana meditation posture
Lord Neminatha, Akota Bronzes (7th century)
An early use of the word for "Sanskrit" in Late Brahmi script (also called Gupta script): Gupta ashoka sam.jpgGupta ashoka skrr.jpgGupta ashoka t.svg Saṃ-skṛ-ta 
Mandsaur stone inscription of Yashodharman-Vishnuvardhana, 532 CE.
Ancient kingdoms and cities of India at the time of Mahavira
Jain miniature painting of 24 tirthankaras, Jaipur, c. 1850
Sanskrit's link to the Prakrit languages and other Indo-European languages
Mahavira in Padmasana meditation posture
Jain temple painting explaining Anekantavada with Blind men and an elephant
The Spitzer Manuscript is dated to about the 2nd century CE (above: folio 383 fragment). Discovered in the Kizil Caves, near the northern branch of the Central Asian Silk Route in northwest China, it is the oldest Sanskrit philosophical manuscript known so far.
The birth of Mahavira, from the Kalpa Sūtra (c.1375–1400 CE)
A Jain monk in meditation, wearing the characteristic white robe and face covering
A 5th-century Sanskrit inscription discovered in Java, Indonesia—one of the earliest in southeast Asia after the Mulavarman inscription discovered in Kutai, eastern Borneo. The Ciaruteun inscription combines two writing scripts and compares the king to the Hindu god Vishnu. It provides a terminus ad quem to the presence of Hinduism in the Indonesian islands. The oldest southeast Asian Sanskrit inscription—called the Vo Canh inscription—so far discovered is near Nha Trang, Vietnam, and it is dated to the late 2nd century to early 3rd century CE.
Lord Mahavira's Jal Mandir (water temple) in Pawapuri, Bihar, India
Nishidhi stone, depicting the vow of sallekhana, 14th century, Karnataka
Sanskrit language's historical presence has been attested in many countries. The evidence includes manuscript pages and inscriptions discovered in South Asia, Southeast Asia and Central Asia. These have been dated between 300 and 1800 CE.
The "Charan Paduka" or foot impression of Mahavira at Jal Mandir
Praying at the feet of a statue of Bahubali
One of the oldest surviving Sanskrit manuscript pages in Gupta script (c. 828 CE), discovered in Nepal
Folio from the Kalpa Sūtra, 15th century
Jain worship may include ritual offerings and recitals.
One of the oldest Hindu Sanskrit inscriptions, the broken pieces of this early-1st-century BCE Hathibada Brahmi Inscription were discovered in Rajasthan. It is a dedication to deities Vāsudeva-Samkarshana (Krishna-Balarama) and mentions a stone temple.
The swastika and five vows
Celebrating Das Lakshana (Paryushana), Jain Center of America, New York City
in the form of a terracotta plaque
Mahavira worship in a manuscript c.1825
The birth of Mahavira, from the Kalpa Sūtra (c.1375–1400 CE)
Sanskrit in modern Indian and other Brahmi scripts: May Śiva bless those who take delight in the language of the gods. (Kālidāsa)
Mahavira iconography is distinguished by a lion stamped (or carved) beneath his feet; a Shrivatsa is on his chest.
Shikharji
One of the earliest known Sanskrit inscriptions in Tamil Grantha script at a rock-cut Hindu Trimurti temple (Mandakapattu, c. 615 CE)
Mahavira temple, Tirumalai
Idol of Suparśvanātha
The ancient Yūpa inscription (one of the earliest and oldest Sanskrit texts written in ancient Indonesia) dating back to the 4th century CE written by Brahmins under the rule of King Mulavarman of the Kutai Martadipura Kingdom located in eastern Borneo
alt=See caption|Rock-cut sculpture of Mahavira in Samanar Hills, Madurai, Tamil Nadu
A symbol to represent the Jain community was chosen in 1975 as part of the commemoration of the 2,500th anniversary of Mahavira’s nirvana.
Sanskrit festival at Pramati Hillview Academy, Mysore, India
Rock-cut sculpture of Mahavira in Kalugumalai Jain Beds, 8th century
Rishabhdev, believed to have lived over 592.704×1018 years ago, is considered the traditional founder of Jainism.
alt=See caption|Tallest known image of the seated Mahavira, Patnaganj
The ruins of Gori Jain temples in Nagarparkar, Pakistan, a pilgrimage site before 1947.
alt=See caption|Four-sided sculpture of Mahavira in Kankali Tila, Mathura
Ranakpur Jain Temple
alt=Two nude statues|Tirthankaras Rishabhanatha (left) and Mahavira, 11th century (British Museum)
Dilwara Temples
alt=Mahavira, seated|Temple relief of Mahavira, 14th century (Seattle Asian Art Museum)
Parshvanath Temple in Khajuraho
alt=See caption|Relief of Mahavira in Thirakoil, Tamil Nadu
Girnar Jain temples
16-foot, 2-inch stone statue of Mahavira in Ahinsa Sthal, Mehrauli, New Delhi{{sfn|Titze|1998|p=266}}|alt=Large outdoor statue of Mahavira, with a seated worshipper for scale
Jal Mandir, Pawapuri
alt=See caption|Mahavira statue in Cave 32 of the Ellora Caves
Lodhurva Jain temple
Mahavira inside Ambapuram cave temple, 7th century
Palitana temples
alt=Dharmachakra temple|Dharmachakra temple in Gajpanth
Saavira Kambada Basadi, Moodbidri, Karnataka
alt=Shri Mahavirji|Shri Mahavirji
Jain temple, Antwerp, Belgium
Jain Center of Greater Phoenix
Brahma Jinalaya, Lakkundi
Jain temple, Potters Bar
Hutheesing Jain Temple
Mahavir Swami at Manilaxmi Tirth, Gujarat

Mahavira (Sanskrit: महावीर) also known as Vardhamana, was the 24th Tirthankara (supreme preacher) of Jainism.

- Mahavira

Jainism traces its spiritual ideas and history through the succession of twenty-four Tirthankaras (supreme preachers of Dharma), with the first in the current time cycle being Rishabhadeva, whom the tradition holds to have lived millions of years ago; the twenty-third tirthankara Parshvanatha, whom historians date to 9th century BCE; and the twenty-fourth tirthankara, Mahavira around 600 BCE.

- Jainism

Sanskrit is the sacred language of Hinduism, the language of classical Hindu philosophy, and of historical texts of Buddhism and Jainism.

- Sanskrit

Dravya means substances or entity in Sanskrit.

- Jainism

The Indian tradition states that the Buddha and the Mahavira preferred the Prakrit language so that everyone could understand it.

- Sanskrit
The hand symbolizes Ahiṃsā, the wheel dharmachakra, the resolve to halt saṃsāra (transmigration).

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