Core Western Ganga Territory
The hand symbolizes Ahiṃsā, the wheel dharmachakra, the resolve to halt saṃsāra (transmigration).
Old Kannada inscription of c. 726 CE, discovered in Talakad, from the rule of King Shivamara I or Sripurusha
Kashivishvanatha temple at Pattadakal, Karnataka
Classification of Saṃsāri Jīvas (transmigrating souls) in Jainism
Ganga Dynasty emblem on a 10th-century copper plate
Jain Narayana temple at Pattadakal, Karnataka
Lord Neminatha, Akota Bronzes (7th century)
The Panchakuta Basadi, Kambadahalli was an important center of Jainism during the Ganga period.
A stanza from the 9th century Kannada classic Kavirajamarga, praising the people for their literary skills
Jain miniature painting of 24 tirthankaras, Jaipur, c. 1850
Gangas of Talakad (Western Gangas). Circa 1080-1138 AD
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Jain temple painting explaining Anekantavada with Blind men and an elephant
Footprint worship at Shravanabelagola
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A Jain monk in meditation, wearing the characteristic white robe and face covering
A mantapa (hall) at the Jain Panchakuta basadi of 9th–10th century at Kambadahalli
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Nishidhi stone, depicting the vow of sallekhana, 14th century, Karnataka
Gommateshwara at Shravanabelagola (982–983) C.E.
Interior and arcades
Praying at the feet of a statue of Bahubali
Kalleshwara Temple Complex, built in the 10th century by the Nolambas, a Western Ganga feudatory, at Aralaguppe in the Tumkur district
Kailasa temple, is one of the largest rock-cut ancient Hindu temples located in Ellora.
Jain worship may include ritual offerings and recitals.
Seeyamangalam Mahavira Rock Cut Temple
Shikhara of Indra Sabha at Ellora.
Celebrating Das Lakshana (Paryushana), Jain Center of America, New York City
Hero stone (870–906 A.D.) with old Kannada inscription at Kalleshvara temple in Aralaguppe
The birth of Mahavira, from the Kalpa Sūtra (c.1375–1400 CE)
The famous Atakur inscription (949 C.E.), a classical Kannada composition pertaining to the Western Ganga-Rashtrakuta victory over the Chola dynasty of Tanjore in the famous battle of Takkolam
Shikharji
Mahasthambha (pillar) and Chandragupta Basadi at Chandragiri Hill in Shravanabelagola
Idol of Suparśvanātha
Chandragiri hill temple complex at Shravanabelagola
A symbol to represent the Jain community was chosen in 1975 as part of the commemoration of the 2,500th anniversary of Mahavira’s nirvana.
Ceiling sculpture, Panchakuta Basadi, Kambadahalli
Rishabhdev, believed to have lived over 592.704×1018 years ago, is considered the traditional founder of Jainism.
Chavundaraya basadi on Chandragiri hill in Shravanabelagola temple complex
The ruins of Gori Jain temples in Nagarparkar, Pakistan, a pilgrimage site before 1947.
Old Kannada inscription at the base of Gomateshwara monolith in Shravanabelagola (981 CE.)
Ranakpur Jain Temple
The famous Begur inscription in old Kannada, dated to c. 908–938 CE, from the rule of Western Ganga dynasty King Ereyappa.
Dilwara Temples
Parshvanath Temple in Khajuraho
Girnar Jain temples
Jal Mandir, Pawapuri
Lodhurva Jain temple
Palitana temples
Saavira Kambada Basadi, Moodbidri, Karnataka
Jain temple, Antwerp, Belgium
Brahma Jinalaya, Lakkundi
Hutheesing Jain Temple

The Chalukyas were replaced by the Rashtrakutas of Manyakheta in 753 CE as the dominant power in the Deccan.

- Western Ganga dynasty

The Western Ganga kings showed benevolent tolerance to all faiths but are most famous for their patronage toward Jainism resulting in the construction of monuments in places such as Shravanabelagola and Kambadahalli.

- Western Ganga dynasty

The early kings of this dynasty were influenced by Hinduism and the later kings by Jainism.

- Rashtrakuta dynasty

Amoghavarsha I made peace with the Western Ganga dynasty by giving them his two daughters in marriage, and then defeated the invading Eastern Chalukyas at Vingavalli and assumed the title Viranarayana.

- Rashtrakuta dynasty

A monolithic, 18 m statue of Bahubali, Gommateshvara, built in 981 CE by the Ganga minister and commander Chavundaraya, is situated on a hilltop in Shravanabelagola in Karnataka.

- Jainism

In the second half of the first century CE, Hindu kings of the Rashtrakuta dynasty sponsored major Jain cave temples.

- Jainism
Core Western Ganga Territory

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Karnataka

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State in the southwestern region of India.

State in the southwestern region of India.

Mallikarjuna temple and Kashi Vishwanatha temple at Pattadakal, built successively by the kings of the Chalukya Empire and Rashtrakuta Empire, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Chief Minister Dr. Devaraj Urs announcing the new name of the Mysore state as 'Karnataka'
Jog Falls, formed by Sharavathi River, are the second-highest plunge waterfalls in India.
Political map of Indian state of Karnataka with the official names of its 31 districts.
emblem of Karnataka
Infosys, a Bengaluru-headquartered information-technology company,
A yakshagana artist
Vishnu image inside the Badami Cave Temple Complex number 3. The complex is an example of Indian rock-cut architecture.
Gomateswara (982–983) at Shravanabelagola is an important centre of Jain pilgrimage.
Halmidi inscription (450 CE) is the earliest attested inscription in the Kannada language.
Indian Institute of Science is one of the premier institutes of India.
Literacy rates of Karnataka districts
Anil Kumble, former captain of the Indian Test team and spin legend, is the highest wicket-taker for India in international cricket.
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bangalore.
The state bird, Indian roller
Bengal tigers at Bannerghatta National Park near Bangalore
Chennakesava Temple is a model example of the Hoysala architecture, later repaired in the 16th century with financial support and grants by the Vijayanagara Emperors.
Gol Gumbaz at Bijapur has the second largest pre-modern dome in the world after the Byzantine Hagia Sophia.
Mysore Palace in the evening, the official residence and seat of the Wodeyar dynasty, the rulers of Mysore of the Mysore Kingdom, the royal family of Mysore.

The decline of Satavahana power led to the rise of the earliest native kingdoms, the Kadambas and the Western Gangas, marking the region's emergence as an independent political entity.

These dynasties were followed by imperial Kannada empires such as the Badami Chalukyas, the Rashtrakuta Empire of Manyakheta and the Western Chalukya Empire, which ruled over large parts of the Deccan and had their capitals in what is now Karnataka.

The Jain philosophy and literature have contributed immensely to the religious and cultural landscape of Karnataka.

Extent of Badami Chalukya Empire, 636 CE, 740 CE.

Chalukya dynasty

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Classical Indian dynasty that ruled large parts of southern and central India between the 6th and the 12th centuries.

Classical Indian dynasty that ruled large parts of southern and central India between the 6th and the 12th centuries.

Extent of Badami Chalukya Empire, 636 CE, 740 CE.
Old Kannada inscription of Chalukya King Mangalesha dated 578 CE at Badami cave temple no.3
Old Kannada inscription on victory pillar, Virupaksha Temple, Pattadakal, 733–745 CE
Coinage of the Chalukyas of Badami. Uncertain ruler. Circa 597-757 CE. Boar and Temple type.
Bhutanatha temple complex, at Badami
Virupaksha temple in Dravidian style at Pattadakal, built 740 CE
Poetry on stone at the Meguti temple (Aihole inscription) dated 634 CE, in Sanskrit language and old Kannada script, with a Kannada language endorsement of about the same date at the bottom.
Vaishnava Cave temple No. 3 at Badami, 578 CE
Bahubali at Jain Cave temple No. 4 at Badami, 6th century
Vishnu image in Cave temple No. 3
Bhutanatha group of temples facing the Badami tank
The Parvati Temple, located about 140 km southeast to the Badami
Aihole – Durga Temple Front View
Aihole – Meguti Jain Temple
Mallikarjuna temple in dravidian style and Kashi Vishwanatha temple in nagara style at Pattadakal, built 740 CE
Dancing Shiva in cave no. 1 in Badami
Papanatha temple at Pattadakal – fusion of southern and northern Indian styles, 680 CE

In the western Deccan, the rise of the Rashtrakutas in the middle of the 8th century eclipsed the Chalukyas of Badami before being revived by their descendants, the Western Chalukyas, in the late 10th century.

Kannada literature, which had enjoyed royal support in the 9th century Rashtrakuta court found eager patronage from the Western Chalukyas in the Jain and Veerashaiva traditions.

His queens were princess from the Alupa Dynasty of South Canara and the Western Ganga Dynasty of Talakad, clans with whom the Chalukyas maintained close family and marital relationships.

Shravanabelagola

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Town located near Channarayapatna of Hassan district in the Indian state of Karnataka and is 144 km from Bengaluru.

Town located near Channarayapatna of Hassan district in the Indian state of Karnataka and is 144 km from Bengaluru.

The pond in the middle of the town, after which it is named, Beḷagoḷa “White Pond”
Statue of Emperor Bharata Chakravartin, after whom India was named Bharatvarsha.
Kannada inscription at Odegal Basadi
Odegal basadi on Vindhyagiri hill
Akkana Basadi
Mahamastakabhisheka of Gommateshwara statue
The tableau of Karnataka depicting Mahamastabhisheka of Lord Gommateshwara, during the Republic Day Parade in 2005

The Gommateshwara Bahubali statue at Shravanabelagola is one of the most important tirthas (pilgrimage destinations) in Jainism, one that reached a peak in architectural and sculptural activity under the patronage of Western Ganga dynasty of Talakad.

Chandragupta Basadi, which was dedicated to Chandragupta Maurya, was originally built there by Ashoka in the third century BC. Chandragiri also has memorials to numerous monks and Śrāvakas who have meditated there since the fifth century AD, including the last king of the Rashtrakuta dynasty of Manyakheta.

Nishidhi, a 14th-century memorial stone depicting the observance of the vow of Sallekhana with old Kannada inscription. Found at Tavanandi forest, Karnataka, India.

Sallekhana

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Nishidhi, a 14th-century memorial stone depicting the observance of the vow of Sallekhana with old Kannada inscription. Found at Tavanandi forest, Karnataka, India.
An inscription (No.130) in memory of Vinayadevasena who observed Sallekhana. 7th-century Kannada script. Found at Shravanbelgola, Karnataka, India.
Doddahundi nishidhi inscription was raised in honor of Western Ganga King Nitimarga I in 869 CE who observed Sallekhana.
The chamber for the ascetics to observe Sallekhana at Udayagiri hills, Odisha, India

Sallekhana (IAST: ), also known as samlehna, santhara, samadhi-marana or sanyasana-marana, is a supplementary vow to the ethical code of conduct of Jainism.

853 – 869)) of the Western Ganga Dynasty.

An inscription on the pillar in front of Gandhavarna Basadi commemorates Indraraja, the grandson of the Rashtrakuta King Krishna III, who died in 982 after observing the vow.