A report on Jainism

The hand symbolizes Ahiṃsā, the wheel dharmachakra, the resolve to halt saṃsāra (transmigration).
Classification of Saṃsāri Jīvas (transmigrating souls) in Jainism
Lord Neminatha, Akota Bronzes (7th century)
Jain miniature painting of 24 tirthankaras, Jaipur, c. 1850
Jain temple painting explaining Anekantavada with Blind men and an elephant
A Jain monk in meditation, wearing the characteristic white robe and face covering
Nishidhi stone, depicting the vow of sallekhana, 14th century, Karnataka
Praying at the feet of a statue of Bahubali
Jain worship may include ritual offerings and recitals.
Celebrating Das Lakshana (Paryushana), Jain Center of America, New York City
The birth of Mahavira, from the Kalpa Sūtra (c.1375–1400 CE)
Shikharji
Idol of Suparśvanātha
A symbol to represent the Jain community was chosen in 1975 as part of the commemoration of the 2,500th anniversary of Mahavira’s nirvana.
Rishabhdev, believed to have lived over 592.704×1018 years ago, is considered the traditional founder of Jainism.
The ruins of Gori Jain temples in Nagarparkar, Pakistan, a pilgrimage site before 1947.
Ranakpur Jain Temple
Dilwara Temples
Parshvanath Temple in Khajuraho
Girnar Jain temples
Jal Mandir, Pawapuri
Lodhurva Jain temple
Palitana temples
Saavira Kambada Basadi, Moodbidri, Karnataka
Jain temple, Antwerp, Belgium
Brahma Jinalaya, Lakkundi
Hutheesing Jain Temple

Ancient Indian religion.

- Jainism
The hand symbolizes Ahiṃsā, the wheel dharmachakra, the resolve to halt saṃsāra (transmigration).

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Relief representing ahimsa

Ahimsa in Jainism

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Relief representing ahimsa
Painting in a Jain temple with the statement "ahinsā paramo dharma" (non-injury is the highest virtue/religion)
Violence (Himsa) gouache on paper, 17th century, Gujarat depicts animals of prey with their victims. The princely couple symbolises love, which is another occasion of violence.
Sculpture depicting the statement "ahimsā paramo dharma" (Photo:Ahinsa Sthal, Delhi)

Ahimsā (', alternatively spelled 'ahinsā', Sanskrit: अहिंसा IAST: ', Pāli: ) in Jainism is a fundamental principle forming the cornerstone of its ethics and doctrine.

Jain Śrāvaka praying at Gommateshwara statue

Śrāvaka (Jainism)

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Jain Śrāvaka praying at Gommateshwara statue
A Jain Śrāvika worshiping

In Jainism, the word Śrāvaka or Sāvaga (from Jain Prakrit) is used to refer the Jain laity (householder).

Chart showing the classification of dravya and astikaya

Jain cosmology

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Chart showing the classification of dravya and astikaya
Structure of Universe according to the Jain scriptures.
Fourteen Rajlok or Triloka. Shape of Universe as per Jain cosmology in form of a cosmic man. Miniature from 17th century, Saṁgrahaṇīratna by Śrīcandra, in Prakrit with a Gujarati commentary. Jain Śvetāmbara cosmological text with commentary and illustrations.
Depiction of Mount Meru at Jambudweep, Hastinapur
Work of Art showing maps and diagrams as per Jain Cosmography from 17th century CE Manuscript of 12th century Jain text Sankhitta Sangheyan
17th century cloth painting depicting seven levels of Jain hell and various tortures suffered in them. Left panel depicts the demi-god and his animal vehicle presiding over the each hell.
Division of time as envisaged by Jains
'Trilok Teerth Dham' modelled after the three lok

Jain cosmology is the description of the shape and functioning of the Universe (loka) and its constituents (such as living beings, matter, space, time etc.) according to Jainism.

Rangoli decorations, made using coloured fine powder or sand, are popular during Diwali.

Diwali

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Rangoli decorations, made using coloured fine powder or sand, are popular during Diwali.
William Simpson labelled his chromolithograph of 1867 CE as "Dewali, feast of lamps". It showed streets lit up at dusk, with a girl and her mother lighting a street corner lamp.
Diwali is celebrated in the honour of Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth.
A picture of Lakshmi and Ganesha worship during Diwali
Diwali celebrations include puja (prayers) to Lakshmi and Ganesha. Lakshmi is of the Vaishnavism tradition, while Ganesha of the Shaivism tradition of Hinduism.
Dhanteras starts off the Diwali celebrations with the lighting of Diya or Panati lamp rows, house cleaning and floor rangoli
A sparkling fire cracker, commonly known as 'Kit Kat' in India
Lighting candle and clay lamp in their house and at temples during Diwali night
A child playing with sparklers during Diwali

Diwali (Deepawali (IAST: dīpāwalī) or Divali; related to Jain Diwali, Bandi Chhor Divas, Tihar, Swanti, Sohrai and Bandna) is a festival of lights and one of the major festivals celebrated by Hindus, Jains, Sikhs, and some Buddhist.

Image of Neminatha at a Jain temple in Bateshwar, Uttar Pradesh

Neminatha

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Image of Neminatha at a Jain temple in Bateshwar, Uttar Pradesh
The birth of Aristanemi, Kalpa Sūtra
Depiction of wedding procession of Neminatha. His legend states that he renounced after hearing animal cries while they were being sacrificed to prepare his wedding feast.
Neminatha temple complex on Girnar hills near Junagadh, Gujarat.
Kalpa Sūtra recto Neminatha's blowing Krishna's conch verso text
The largest statue of Neminath with height of 16 meters at Tirumalai built in 12th century
Girnar Jain Temple
Neminatha, Nasik Caves, 6th century
Akota Bronzes, MET museum, 7th century
Pandavleni
Neminath Sculpture, National Museum, New Delhi, 11th Century
Image at Maharaja Chhatrasal Museum, 12th century
Neminath idol, Government Museum, Mathura, 12th Century
Depiction of Neminatha on Naag as bed, chakra on foot finger and conch played by nose at Parshvanath temple, Tijara
Brahma Jinalaya
Kulpakji
Arahanthgiri Jain Math
Chavundaraya Basadi in Shravanabelagola
Bhand Dewal
Kamal Basadi

Neminatha, also known as Nemi and Arishtanemi, is the twenty-second tirthankara (ford-maker) in Jainism.

A depiction of liberated souls at moksha.

Moksha

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A depiction of liberated souls at moksha.
Gajendra Moksha (pictured) is a symbolic tale in Vaishnavism. The elephant Gajendra enters a lake where a crocodile (Huhu) clutches his leg and becomes his suffering. Despite his pain, Gajendra constantly remembers Vishnu, who then liberates him. Gajendra symbolically represents human beings, Huhu represents sins, and the lake is saṃsāra.
Mokṣha is a key concept in Yoga, where it is a state of “awakening”, liberation and freedom in this life.

Moksha (मोक्ष, ), also called vimoksha, vimukti and mukti, is a term in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism for various forms of emancipation, enlightenment, liberation, and release.

The Prakrit word "dha-ṃ-ma"/𑀥𑀁𑀫 (Sanskrit: Dharma धर्म) in the Brahmi script, as inscribed by Emperor Ashoka in his Edicts of Ashoka (3rd century BCE).

Dharma

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The Prakrit word "dha-ṃ-ma"/𑀥𑀁𑀫 (Sanskrit: Dharma धर्म) in the Brahmi script, as inscribed by Emperor Ashoka in his Edicts of Ashoka (3rd century BCE).
The Kandahar Bilingual Rock Inscription is from Indian Emperor Asoka in 258 BC, and found in Afghanistan. The inscription renders the word dharma in Sanskrit as eusebeia in Greek, suggesting dharma in ancient India meant spiritual maturity, devotion, piety, duty towards and reverence for human community.
Sikhism
The wheel in the centre of India's flag symbolises dharma.

Dharma (dharma, ; dhamma) is a key concept with multiple meanings in Indian religions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and others.

Das Lakshana (Paryushana) celebrations, Jain Center of America, New York City

Paryushana

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Das Lakshana (Paryushana) celebrations, Jain Center of America, New York City
Das Lakshana (Paryushana) celebrations, Jain Center of America, New York City
Das Lakshana (Paryushana) celebrations, Jain Center of America, New York City
Das Lakshana (Paryushana) celebrations, Jain Center of America, New York City

Paryushana is the most important annual holy event for Jains and is usually celebrated in August or September in Hindu calendar Bhadrapad Month's Shukla Paksha.

Nishidhi, a 14th-century memorial stone depicting the observance of the vow of Sallekhana with old Kannada inscription. Found at Tavanandi forest, Karnataka, India.

Sallekhana

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Nishidhi, a 14th-century memorial stone depicting the observance of the vow of Sallekhana with old Kannada inscription. Found at Tavanandi forest, Karnataka, India.
An inscription (No.130) in memory of Vinayadevasena who observed Sallekhana. 7th-century Kannada script. Found at Shravanbelgola, Karnataka, India.
Doddahundi nishidhi inscription was raised in honor of Western Ganga King Nitimarga I in 869 CE who observed Sallekhana.
The chamber for the ascetics to observe Sallekhana at Udayagiri hills, Odisha, India

Sallekhana (IAST: ), also known as samlehna, santhara, samadhi-marana or sanyasana-marana, is a supplementary vow to the ethical code of conduct of Jainism.

Mahāvīra did not use the word anekāntavada, but his teachings contain the seeds of the concept (painting from Rajasthan, ca. 1900)

Anekantavada

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Mahāvīra did not use the word anekāntavada, but his teachings contain the seeds of the concept (painting from Rajasthan, ca. 1900)
Seven blind men and an elephant parable
Gandhi used the Jain concept of Anekantavada to explain his views.

(अनेकान्तवाद, "many-sidedness") is the Jain doctrine about metaphysical truths that emerged in ancient India.