A report on Jainism

The hand symbolizes Ahiṃsā, the wheel dharmachakra, the resolve to halt saṃsāra (transmigration).
Classification of Saṃsāri Jīvas (transmigrating souls) in Jainism
Lord Neminatha, Akota Bronzes (7th century)
Jain miniature painting of 24 tirthankaras, Jaipur, c. 1850
Jain temple painting explaining Anekantavada with Blind men and an elephant
A Jain monk in meditation, wearing the characteristic white robe and face covering
Nishidhi stone, depicting the vow of sallekhana, 14th century, Karnataka
Praying at the feet of a statue of Bahubali
Jain worship may include ritual offerings and recitals.
Celebrating Das Lakshana (Paryushana), Jain Center of America, New York City
The birth of Mahavira, from the Kalpa Sūtra (c.1375–1400 CE)
Shikharji
Idol of Suparśvanātha
A symbol to represent the Jain community was chosen in 1975 as part of the commemoration of the 2,500th anniversary of Mahavira’s nirvana.
Rishabhdev, believed to have lived over 592.704×1018 years ago, is considered the traditional founder of Jainism.
The ruins of Gori Jain temples in Nagarparkar, Pakistan, a pilgrimage site before 1947.
Ranakpur Jain Temple
Dilwara Temples
Parshvanath Temple in Khajuraho
Girnar Jain temples
Jal Mandir, Pawapuri
Lodhurva Jain temple
Palitana temples
Saavira Kambada Basadi, Moodbidri, Karnataka
Jain temple, Antwerp, Belgium
Brahma Jinalaya, Lakkundi
Hutheesing Jain Temple

Ancient Indian religion.

- Jainism
The hand symbolizes Ahiṃsā, the wheel dharmachakra, the resolve to halt saṃsāra (transmigration).

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The Om syllable is considered a mantra in its own right in the Vedanta school of Hinduism.

Mantra

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Sacred utterance, a numinous sound, a syllable, word or phonemes, or group of words in Sanskrit, Pali and other languages believed by practitioners to have religious, magical or spiritual powers.

Sacred utterance, a numinous sound, a syllable, word or phonemes, or group of words in Sanskrit, Pali and other languages believed by practitioners to have religious, magical or spiritual powers.

The Om syllable is considered a mantra in its own right in the Vedanta school of Hinduism.
Om Mani Padme Hum, a Buddhist Mantra written in Tibetan Script with Mandala Style
Mantras written on a rock near Namche Bazaar Nepal
Mantra of the Hare Krishna bhakti school of Hinduism
Om mani padme hum on the Gangpori (photo 1938–1939 German expedition to Tibet.
Hare Krishna devotees in Amsterdam carrying a poster with the Hare Krishna Mantra
A personification of the Gayatri Mantra
Japanese Mandala of the Mantra of Light, an important mantra of the Shingon and Kegon sects
A Japanese depiction of the Amida Triad as Seed Syllables (in Siddham Script). Visualizing deities in the form of seed mantras is a common Vajrayana meditation. In Shingon, one of the most common practices is Ajikan (阿字觀), meditating on the mantric syllable A.
The mantra of Padmasambhava (Om Āḥ Hūṁ Vajra Guru Padma Siddhi Hūṁ), in Lanydza (Ranjana) and Tibetan script.

The use, structure, function, importance, and types of mantras vary according to the school and philosophy of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism.

Non-possession

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Philosophy that holds that no one or anything possesses anything.

Philosophy that holds that no one or anything possesses anything.

ln Jainism, aparigraha is the virtue of non-possessiveness, non-grasping or non-greediness.

Broad classification of Karmas as per Jain philosophy

Karma in Jainism

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Broad classification of Karmas as per Jain philosophy
The soul travels to any one of the four states of existence after the death depending on its karmas
The common representation of the mango tree and men analogy of the lesyas.
Representation of a soul undergoing reincarnation.
Karma as moral action and reaction: goodness sown is reaped as goodness.

Karma is the basic principle within an overarching psycho-cosmology in Jainism.

An image of Ambika in Cave 34 of the Ellora Caves

Ambika (Jainism)

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An image of Ambika in Cave 34 of the Ellora Caves
Ambika as Gullikayi ji in front of Gommateshwara statue
Goddess Ambika sitting on lion and mango tree branch in right arm and her son in left, Royal Ontario Museum, 8th-9th century
Ambika sculpture from Kushan Empire
Ambika with Sarvana, LACMA, 6th century
Image depicting Goddess Ambika in LACMA, 6th-7th century
Carving of Ambikadevi Kalugumalai Jain Beds, 8th century
Image depicting Goddess Ambika from Karnataka, India, c. 900 CE, Norton Simon Museum
Sculpture of Goddess Ambika, 1034 AD, British Museum
Goddess Ambika in Museum Rietberg, 11th century
Sculpture of Gomedh and Ambika at Maharaja Chhatrasal Museum, 11th century
Sarvanubhuti and Kushmandini with Jinas, 11 century, Art Gallery of New South Wales
Goddess Ambika idol, Victoria and Albert Museum, 1150-1200 AD
Goddess Ambika - Medieval Period (Government Museum, Mathura)
Modern iconography, Shri Munisuvrata-Nemi-Parshva Jinalaya
Goddess Ambika at Manmodi Caves

In Jainism, Ambika (अम्बिका, ଅମ୍ବିକା "Mother") or Ambika Devi (अम्बिका देवी "the Goddess-Mother") is the Yakshini "dedicated attendant deity" or "protector goddess" of the 22nd Tirthankara, Neminatha.

Green colour in the Jain flag stands for brahmacharya

Brahmacharya

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Concept within Indian religions that literally means to stay in conduct within one's own Self.

Concept within Indian religions that literally means to stay in conduct within one's own Self.

Green colour in the Jain flag stands for brahmacharya

In Yoga, Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism it generally refers to a lifestyle characterized by sexual continence or complete abstinence.

Kevala jnana

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Kevala gyana (केवल ज्ञान) or Keval gyan means omniscience in Jainism and is roughly translated as complete understanding or supreme wisdom.

The 65 ft high Gommateshwara statue at Shravanabelagola, Karnataka, India, was built in 983 A.D.

Bahubali

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The 65 ft high Gommateshwara statue at Shravanabelagola, Karnataka, India, was built in 983 A.D.
Sculpture depicting Bahubali's meditation in Kayotsarga posture with vines enveloped around his body (Photo: Badami caves)
Bahubali monolith of Karkala
Bahubali monolith of Dharmastala
Bahubali monolith of Venur
Bahubali monolith of Gommatagiri, Mysore
28 ft-high monolith of Bahubali at Kumbhoj
Poem by Boppanna
Bahubali, Metropolitan Museum of Art (6th CE)
Indra Sabha, Ellora Caves (9th CE)
Bahubali monolith at Halebidu (12th CE)
Miniature version of the Gommateshwara statue at Shravanabelagola
Bahubali statue at YSR state Archaeology Museum, Hyderabad, 12th century
{{convert|31|ft|m|adj=on|abbr=out}} statue of Bahubali at Bada Gaon
Gomateshwara at Kalugumalai Jain Beds, 8th century
Bahubali at Andimalai Caves, 10th century
Bahubali at Aretipur
Depiction of Bharata-Bahubali fight

Bahubali (One With Strong Arms), a much revered figure among Jains, was the son of Rishabdev (the first tirthankara of Jainism) and the brother of Bharata Chakravartin.

Shravanabelagola

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Town located near Channarayapatna of Hassan district in the Indian state of Karnataka and is 144 km from Bengaluru.

Town located near Channarayapatna of Hassan district in the Indian state of Karnataka and is 144 km from Bengaluru.

The pond in the middle of the town, after which it is named, Beḷagoḷa “White Pond”
Statue of Emperor Bharata Chakravartin, after whom India was named Bharatvarsha.
Kannada inscription at Odegal Basadi
Odegal basadi on Vindhyagiri hill
Akkana Basadi
Mahamastakabhisheka of Gommateshwara statue
The tableau of Karnataka depicting Mahamastabhisheka of Lord Gommateshwara, during the Republic Day Parade in 2005

The Gommateshwara Bahubali statue at Shravanabelagola is one of the most important tirthas (pilgrimage destinations) in Jainism, one that reached a peak in architectural and sculptural activity under the patronage of Western Ganga dynasty of Talakad.

Bihar

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State in eastern India.

State in eastern India.

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(Sitting L to R): Rajendra Prasad and Anugrah Narayan Sinha during Mahatma Gandhi's 1917 Champaran Satyagraha
Kathak classical dance form, from Bhojpur region
Patna river port on national inland waterways-1 at Gai Ghat
Front view of administrative building of IIT Patna
NIT Patna main building

Mahavira, the 24th and last Tirthankara of Jainism, was born in Vaishali around the 6th century BC. Śrāddha ritual performed in Pitru Paksha period considered as fruitful in the holy city of Gaya, which is seen as a special place to perform the rite, and hosts a fair during the Pitri Paksha period.

Panch Kalyanaka

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Panch Kalyanaka (pan̄ca kalyāṇaka, "Five Auspicious Events") are the five chief auspicious events that occur in the life of tirthankara in Jainism.