A report on Jakarta

Replica of the Padrão of Sunda Kalapa (1522), a stone pillar with a cross of the Order of Christ commemorating a treaty between the Portuguese Empire and the Hindu Sunda Kingdom, at Jakarta History Museum.
The 5th-century Tugu inscription discovered in Tugu district, North Jakarta
Batavia around 1780
The City Hall of Batavia (Stadhuis van Batavia), the seat of the Governor-General of the VOC in the late 18th century by Johannes Rach c. 1770. The building now houses the Jakarta History Museum, Jakarta Old Town.
One of the most monumental projects launched by Sukarno was the demolition of government buildings in Merdeka Square to make way for the National Monument.
Aerial view of North Jakarta
Ancol beach
Facade of the Museum Bank Indonesia in Kota Tua
Wisma 46 in post-modernist architecture, the fourth tallest building in Jakarta
view of Monas, Jakarta's landmark
Bundaran HI, a 1960s landmark of Jakarta located at the west end of Menteng District.
Boat ride at Indonesian archipelago lake in Taman Mini Indonesia Indah
Ancol Gondola
Chinese in Jakarta praying during Chinese New Year in Glodok, Jakarta
The Indonesian Stock Exchange (Bursa Efek Indonesia) building in Jakarta, one of the oldest in Asia.
Bank Indonesia head office
Gandaria City Mall in South Jakarta
Jakarta Old City Post Office at Fatahillah Square, Central Jakarta
Most visitors to Jakarta are domestic tourists, and Taman Mini Indonesia Indah is aimed at supporting national identity and patriotism.
The main TV tower of TVRI at its headquarters in Jakarta
Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia campus at Semanggi
University of Indonesia campus
Tanjidor music of Betawi culture demonstrate European influence
Gado-gado is a popular Indonesian salad dish.
Football match at Gelora Bung Karno Stadium
Asian Games 2018 opening ceremony in Gelora Bung Karno Stadium, 2018
Jakarta Merdeka Palace
Map of the administrative cities (Kota administratif) in Jakarta province. The Thousand Islands Regency (to the north) is not shown. Each administrative city is further divided into districts (Kecamatan).
Batavia map of Meester Cornelis (now Jatinegara)
The Secretariat of ASEAN at Jl. Sisingamangaraja No.70A, South Jakarta, Indonesia
Jakarta Street in Tripoli, Libya
Al-Azhar Great Mosque, It was Jakarta's largest mosque when it was built until it was surpassed by the Istiqlal Mosque.
The Jakarta Cathedral, one of the oldest churches in Jakarta.
Kim Tek Ie, the oldest Taoist and Buddhist temple in Jakarta.
Aditya Jaya Hindu temple, Rawamangun, East Jakarta.
Ondel-Ondel, often used as a symbol of Betawi culture
Chinese paifang in Mangga Dua, Central Jakarta
The Golden Snail IMAX theatre at Taman Mini Indonesia Indah
Jakarta Fair of 2007
Japanese community celebrating Ennichisai in Blok M, South Jakarta
Traditional Betawi dance, Tari Yapong

Capital and largest city of Indonesia.

- Jakarta

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Jakarta History Museum was housed on the original town hall of 17th-century Batavia, the capital of Dutch East Indies and center of the Asian spice trade.

Kota Tua Jakarta

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Jakarta History Museum was housed on the original town hall of 17th-century Batavia, the capital of Dutch East Indies and center of the Asian spice trade.
A map of Batavia in 1740. The area of Batavia within the city walls and moat as well as the Sunda Kelapa harbor to the left (north) of the map make up Jakarta Old Town.
Declining city, in late 19th-century the walled Old Batavia has been reduced to kampung settlements and ruined old buildings.
A street in Old Batavia in 1890, depicting 17th century housing before the development of a business district.
East facade of Cipta Niaga Building, formerly a bank office, has been left roofless and slowly deteriorates; the wooden interior exposed to the element.
Wayang Museum in Jakarta.
Jembatan Kota Intan drawbridge.
Cafe Batavia.
Post Office in Jakarta Old Town.

Kota Tua Jakarta ("Jakarta Old Town"), officially known as Kota Tua, is a neighborhood comprising the original downtown area of Jakarta, Indonesia.

A Sundanese couple wearing neo-traditional wedding attire

Sundanese people

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Indigenous ethnic group native to the western region of Java island in Indonesia.

Indigenous ethnic group native to the western region of Java island in Indonesia.

A Sundanese couple wearing neo-traditional wedding attire
Jaipongan Mojang Priangan, a Sundanese traditional dance performance.
Batutulis inscription in Bogor, describes the deeds of Sunda King, Sri Baduga Maharaja, popularly known as Prabu Siliwangi.
Sundanese boys playing Angklung in Garut, c. 1910–1930.
Map showing the location of the Sundanese in Java.
Sundanese scripts.
Cangkuang temple, the 8th century Hindu temple near Garut testify the Sundanese Hindu past.
Akad nikah, Sundanese Islamic wedding vows in front of penghulu and witnesses.
A Hindu shrine dedicated to King Siliwangi in the Hindu temple Pura Parahyangan Agung Jagatkarta, Bogor, West Java.
Elderly Sundanese woman near a rice paddy, at Garut, West Java.
Wayang Golek, traditional Sundanese puppetry.
SambaSunda music performance, featuring traditional Sundanese music instruments such as kecapi, suling, and kendang.
Traditional Sundanese house with Capit Gunting shape in Papandak, Garut.
A typical modest Sundanese meal consists of steamed rice, fried salted fish, sayur asem (vegetable with tamarind based soup), lalab sambal (raw vegetables salad with chili paste) and karedok (vegetable salad with peanuts paste).
A Sundanese Leuit (rice barn), initially Sundanese are rice farmers.
A depiction of King Siliwangi or Sri Baduga Maharaja, in Keraton Kasepuhan Cirebon.

The western third of the island of Java, namely the provinces of West Java, Banten, and Jakarta, as well as the westernmost part of Central Java, is called by the Sundanese people Tatar Sunda or Pasundan (meaning Sundanese land).

Bogor

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City in the West Java province, Indonesia.

City in the West Java province, Indonesia.

The Kingdom of Sunda had its capital in Pakuan Pajajaran
A Dutch map showing the location of the Pakuan Pajajaran relatively to Buitenzorg
A 1600-year-old stone inscription (prasasti) of the Tarumanagara kingdom era
The Great Post Road passing Buitenzorg in the 19th century
Bogor Palace in 1910s when it was still the residence of the Governor-General
Baedeker map of the town, ca 1914
Coat of Arms of Buitenzorg (now Bogor) during Dutch colonial era, granted in 1932
Aerial picture of Bogor during the 1930s
R. A. A. Muharram Wiranatakusuma, president of the Pasundan State with his secretary in Bogor (1948)
Ciliwung River on the outskirts of Bogor
Bogor and Mount Salak
A Hindu shrine dedicated to King Siliwangi, in the Hindu temple Pura Parahyangan Agung Jagatkarta, the second largest temple in Indonesia. Pakuan Pajajaran (Bogor) is the capital region of the Sunda Galuh Kingdom, the last Hindu kingdom in the archipelago along with Majapahit.
School girls in Muslim dress in the Bogor Botanical Garden
Buildings in downtown Bogor
Guppy fishes are exported in large quantities from Bogor.
Bogor railway station
Veterinary schools and laboratories existed in Buitenzorg (Bogor) from the period of Dutch colonization. Photo 1907.
Lily pond in the Bogor Botanical Garden
The former residence of the Governor-General, now the summer palace of the President of Indonesia
Bogor Cathedral Photo 1920

Located around 60 km south of the national capital of Jakarta, Bogor is the 6th largest city in the Jakarta metropolitan area and the 14th overall nationwide.

Bekasi

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Bekasi commercial centers
Tokyo Metro 05 series EMU set 112 at Bekasi Station
Patriot Chandrabhaga Stadium
The city's People's Representative Council building

Bekasi is a landlocked city in West Java, Indonesia, located on the eastern border of Jakarta.

An updated Köppen–Geiger climate map

Köppen climate classification

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One of the most widely used climate classification systems.

One of the most widely used climate classification systems.

An updated Köppen–Geiger climate map
Tropical climate distribution
Dry climate distribution
Temperate climate distribution
Continental climate distribution
The snowy city of Sapporo
Polar climate distribution
North America
Europe
Russia
Central Asia
East Asia
South America
Africa
Western Asia
South Asia
Southeast Asia
Melanesia/Oceania
Australia
New Zealand
Tropical climate distribution

Jakarta, Indonesia (Am)

A Javanese bride and groom wearing their traditional garb

Javanese people

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The Javan or Javanese (Javanese:, Wong Jawa (in Ngoko register); , Tiyang Jawi (in Krama register)) are indigenous ethnic group native to the central and eastern hemisphere of Java island, Indonesia.

The Javan or Javanese (Javanese:, Wong Jawa (in Ngoko register); , Tiyang Jawi (in Krama register)) are indigenous ethnic group native to the central and eastern hemisphere of Java island, Indonesia.

A Javanese bride and groom wearing their traditional garb
Javanese adapted many aspects of Indian culture, such as the Ramayana epic.
Sultan Amangkurat II of Mataram (upper right) watching warlord Untung Surapati fighting Captain Tack of the Dutch East India Company (VOC). ca 1684 AD.
A Javanese courtly ceremony at Keraton Surakarta in 1932.
Javanese cultural expressions, such as wayang and gamelan are often used to promote the excellence of Javanese culture.
Gamelan is one of Javanese cultural expression that demonstrate refinement.
Javanese abugida.
Javanese priyayi (aristocrat) and servants, c. undefined 1865.
Javanese temple.
Traditional Javanese house.
Example of Javanese cuisine. Clockwise: fried tempeh, mlinjo crackers, gudeg with rice wrapped in teak leaf, green chili sambal and sliced lime.
Nasi tumpeng, the quintessentially Javanese rice dish, symbolises the volcano.
A Javanese sailor.
Inhabitants of Jave la Grande (Great Java island), from Nicholas Vallard's manuscript sea atlas (1547). The people are armed with spear and shortsword with curving hilt, a feature of Indonesian weapon (golok?). The man riding a horse seems to be a leader or noble. The servant behind him carried a parasol. Several men is wearing turbans, which may indicate that they are Muslims, but the women did not cover their head like Muslims do (it needs to be noted that, this custom of Muslim women not wearing a veil in Indonesia is quite common until after World War 2). In the background are several raised wooden huts, also a feature of Indonesian building. It is unknown whether these huts are for dwelling or serve as a temporary shelter for people working on the orchard.
Javanese migrant workers in Suriname, circa 1940
A decorative kris with a figure of Semar as the handle. The bilah has thirteen luk
Varieties of Javanese keris
Weapons of Java: Machetes, maces, bow and arrows, blowpipe, sling
Weapon of Java: Keris
Short swords, shields, and a matchlock gun (istinggar)
Javanese weapons and standards
Various keris and pole weapons of Java.
Javanese woodworkers making traditional masks during the Dutch East Indies era
The carpenters' tools of the Javanese people
Javanese agricultural tools
A drawing of Javanese manufacturing tools, handicrafts, and musical instruments
Javanese musical instruments, many of which require the skills of blacksmith and carpenters
Javanese masks
Javanese temple.

In 1619 the Dutch established their trading headquarter in Batavia.

The territory of Tarumanagara

Tarumanagara

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Early Sundanese Indianised kingdom, located in western Java, whose 5th-century ruler, Purnawarman, produced the earliest known inscriptions in Java, which are estimated to date from around 450 CE.

Early Sundanese Indianised kingdom, located in western Java, whose 5th-century ruler, Purnawarman, produced the earliest known inscriptions in Java, which are estimated to date from around 450 CE.

The territory of Tarumanagara
Ciaruteun inscription discovered by Tjiaroeteun river near Buitenzorg, photographed before 1900.
Citarum river in West Java, etymologically connected to Taruma kingdom.
1600-year-old stone inscription from the era of Purnawarman, king of Tarumanagara, founded in Tugu sub-district of Jakarta.
Fragment of Hindu god Vishnu discovered in Batujaya archaeological site, West Java.
The fine brickwork on the base of Batujaya Buddhist stupa in Karawang, dated from late Tarumanagara period (5th-7th century) to early Srivijaya influence (7th-10th century).
Two Vishnu statues from Cibuaya, Karawang, West Java. Tarumanagara c. 7th-8th century. The tubular crown bears similarities with Cambodian Khmer art.
Buddhist clay votive tablets discovered at Batujaya stupa.

At least seven stone inscriptions connected to this kingdom were discovered in Western Java area, near Bogor and Jakarta.

Tangerang

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City in the province of Banten, Indonesia.

City in the province of Banten, Indonesia.

Map of Tangerang's fort dated 1709
A traditional Cina Benteng wedding ceremony.
Tangcity Mall
Soekarno–Hatta Airport Rail Link EA203 at the Batuceper railway station.
Soekarno-Hatta International Airport, Terminal 1
The main road in Alam Sutera

Located on the western border of Jakarta, it is the third largest urban centre in the Greater Jakarta metropolitan area after Jakarta and Bekasi; the sixth largest city proper in the nation; and the largest city in Banten province.

Royal Dutch East Indies Army bomber planes fly over Batavia Koningsplein in the 1930s.

Merdeka Square, Jakarta

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Royal Dutch East Indies Army bomber planes fly over Batavia Koningsplein in the 1930s.
Sukarno speaking at the Rapat Akbar on 19 September 1945.
Plan of Merdeka Square in 1965
The bust memorial of Chairil Anwar, Indonesian poet, northern park of Merdeka Square.
The view of Merdeka Square and Jakarta skyline from Istiqlal Mosque, Jakarta.
Architectural model of Merdeka Square, displayed in National Monument
Map of Merdeka Square, Jakarta, and surrounding important buildings.
Gambir Station on east side of the square.
Kartini statue
The Monas reflecting pool
Prince Diponegoro Monument
Visitors enjoying the park
Rapat Akbar 19 September 1945 monument
Garuda garden vase
Football play at Merdeka Square
Flower garden
Merdeka Palace

Merdeka Square (Indonesian: Medan Merdeka or Lapangan Merdeka) is a large square located in the center of Jakarta, Indonesia.

Anti-PKI propaganda literature

Indonesian mass killings of 1965–66

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The Indonesian mass killings of 1965–66, also known as the Indonesian genocide, Indonesian Communist Purge, or Indonesian politicide (Pembunuhan Massal Indonesia & Pembersihan G.30.S/PKI), were large-scale killings and civil unrest that occurred in Indonesia over several months, targeting Communist Party of Indonesia (PKI) party members, communist sympathisers, Gerwani women, ethnic Javanese Abangan, ethnic Chinese, atheists, alleged "unbelievers" and alleged leftists, often at the instigation of the armed forces and government, which were supported by Western NATO countries, such as the United States and the United Kingdom.

The Indonesian mass killings of 1965–66, also known as the Indonesian genocide, Indonesian Communist Purge, or Indonesian politicide (Pembunuhan Massal Indonesia & Pembersihan G.30.S/PKI), were large-scale killings and civil unrest that occurred in Indonesia over several months, targeting Communist Party of Indonesia (PKI) party members, communist sympathisers, Gerwani women, ethnic Javanese Abangan, ethnic Chinese, atheists, alleged "unbelievers" and alleged leftists, often at the instigation of the armed forces and government, which were supported by Western NATO countries, such as the United States and the United Kingdom.

Anti-PKI propaganda literature
Major General Suharto (at right, foreground) attends a funeral for generals assassinated on 5 October 1965
A certificate of gratitude from the Regent of Sleman for financial donations to the elimination of the PKI

They started in the capital, Jakarta, and spread to Central and East Java, and later Bali.