Jakob Böhme

BehmenistBehmenismBehmenistsJacob BöhmeBoehmeBöhmeJacob BoehmeJakob BohmeJakob BoehmeBehemenist
Jakob Böhme (24 April 1575 – 17 November 1624) was a German philosopher, Christian mystic, and Lutheran Protestant theologian.wikipedia
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Doctrine of signatures

Signatura Rerum
In 1621 Böhme wrote "De Signatura Rerum".
The writings of Jakob Böhme (1575–1624) spread the doctrine of signatures.

John Pordage

Rev Dr John Pordage
Dr. John Pordage, a commentator on Böhme, wrote that Böhme "whensoever he attributes evil to eternal nature considers it in its fallen state, as it became infected by the fall of Lucifer... ." Evil is seen as "the disorder, rebellion, perversion of making spirit nature's servant", which is to say a perversion of initial Divine order.
He founded the 17th century English Behmenist group which would later become known as the Philadelphian Society when it was led by his disciple and successor, Jane Leade.

Martin Moller

MollerMartin Möller
Böhme joined the "Conventicle of God's Real Servants" - a parochial study group organized by Martin Möller.
He came to Görlitz in 1600, where Jakob Böhme was in his congregation.

Christian mysticism

Christian mysticmysticmysticism
Jakob Böhme (24 April 1575 – 17 November 1624) was a German philosopher, Christian mystic, and Lutheran Protestant theologian.
This sentimental, anti-intellectual form of pietism is seen in the thought and teaching of Zinzendorf, founder of the Moravians; but more intellectually rigorous forms of pietism are seen in the teachings of John Wesley, which were themselves influenced by Zinzendorf, and in the teachings of American preachers Jonathan Edwards, who restored to pietism Gerson's focus on obedience and borrowed from early church teachers Origen and Gregory of Nyssa the notion that humans yearn for God, and John Woolman, who combined a mystical view of the world with a deep concern for social issues; like Wesley, Woolman was influenced by Jakob Böhme, William Law and The Imitation of Christ.

Vision (spirituality)

visionvisionsreligious vision
Böhme had a number of mystical experiences throughout his youth, culminating in a vision in 1600 as one day he focused his attention onto the exquisite beauty of a beam of sunlight reflected in a pewter dish.

Radical Pietism

Radical PietistRadical PietisticRadical Pietists
He has in turn greatly influenced many anti-authoritarian and mystical movements, such as Radical Pietism (including the Ephrata Cloister and Society of the Woman in the Wilderness), the Religious Society of Friends, the Philadelphians, the Gichtelians, the Harmony Society, the Zoarite Separatists, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and Christian theosophy.
Many of the Radical Pietists were influenced by the writings of Jakob Böhme, Gottfried Arnold, and Philipp Jakob Spener, among others.

Görlitz

GoerlitzGörlitz, GermanyGorlitz
Böhme was born on 24 April 1575 at Alt Seidenberg (now Stary Zawidów, Poland), a village near Görlitz in Upper Lusatia, a territory of the Kingdom of Bohemia.

Harmony Society

HarmonistRappitesHarmonites
He has in turn greatly influenced many anti-authoritarian and mystical movements, such as Radical Pietism (including the Ephrata Cloister and Society of the Woman in the Wilderness), the Religious Society of Friends, the Philadelphians, the Gichtelians, the Harmony Society, the Zoarite Separatists, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and Christian theosophy.
Rapp became inspired by the philosophies of Jakob Böhme, Philipp Jakob Spener, Johann Heinrich Jung, and Emanuel Swedenborg, among others, and later wrote Thoughts on the Destiny of Man, published in German in 1824 and in English a year later, in which he outlined his ideas and philosophy.

Philadelphians

Philadelphian SocietyPhiladelphianBlack Philadelphians
He has in turn greatly influenced many anti-authoritarian and mystical movements, such as Radical Pietism (including the Ephrata Cloister and Society of the Woman in the Wilderness), the Religious Society of Friends, the Philadelphians, the Gichtelians, the Harmony Society, the Zoarite Separatists, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and Christian theosophy.
Pordage was attracted to the ideas of Jakob Böhme, a Lutheran theosophist and Christian mystic.

Zoar, Ohio

ZoarZoarite SeparatistsSeparatists of Zoar
He has in turn greatly influenced many anti-authoritarian and mystical movements, such as Radical Pietism (including the Ephrata Cloister and Society of the Woman in the Wilderness), the Religious Society of Friends, the Philadelphians, the Gichtelians, the Harmony Society, the Zoarite Separatists, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and Christian theosophy.
Having separated from the established church, their theology was based in part on the writings of Jakob Böhme.

Balthasar Walther

Böhme's disciple and mentor, the Liegnitz physician Balthasar Walther, who had travelled to the Holy Land in search of magical, kabbalistic and alchemical wisdom, also introduced kabbalistic ideas into Böhme's thought.
Born in Liegnitz in modern Poland, Walther was a significant influence on the thought of the German theosopher Jakob Böhme.

Coenraad van Beuningen

The son of Böhme's chief antagonist, the pastor primarius of Görlitz Gregorius Richter, edited a collection of extracts from his writings, which were afterwards published complete at Amsterdam with the help of Coenraad van Beuningen in the year 1682.
In 1682, he funded the publication of the work of the mystic Jacob Böhme.

Martinism

MartinistMartinist OrderMartinists
He has in turn greatly influenced many anti-authoritarian and mystical movements, such as Radical Pietism (including the Ephrata Cloister and Society of the Woman in the Wilderness), the Religious Society of Friends, the Philadelphians, the Gichtelians, the Harmony Society, the Zoarite Separatists, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and Christian theosophy.
In addition, Saint-Martin drew much inspiration from the work of Jakob Böhme.

Johannes Kelpius

Kelpius CommunitySociety of the Woman in the Wilderness
He has in turn greatly influenced many anti-authoritarian and mystical movements, such as Radical Pietism (including the Ephrata Cloister and Society of the Woman in the Wilderness), the Religious Society of Friends, the Philadelphians, the Gichtelians, the Harmony Society, the Zoarite Separatists, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and Christian theosophy.
Zimmermann was himself attached to the ideas of the mystic Jakob Böhme.

Johann Georg Gichtel

GichteliansJohann George Gichtel
He has in turn greatly influenced many anti-authoritarian and mystical movements, such as Radical Pietism (including the Ephrata Cloister and Society of the Woman in the Wilderness), the Religious Society of Friends, the Philadelphians, the Gichtelians, the Harmony Society, the Zoarite Separatists, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and Christian theosophy.
He became an ardent disciple of Jakob Böhme, whose works he published in 1682 (Amsterdam, 2 vols); but before the time of his death, he had attracted to himself a small band of followers known as "Gichtelians" or "Brethren of the Angels," who propagated certain views at which he had arrived independently of Böhme.

Franz Xaver von Baader

Franz von BaaderBaaderFranz Xaver Baader
Böhme was also an important source of German Romantic philosophy, influencing Schelling and Franz von Baader in particular.
But he also came into contact with the mystical speculations of Meister Eckhart, Louis Claude de Saint-Martin, and above all those of Jakob Böhme, which were more to his liking.

Christian theosophy

Theosophytheosophisttheosophical
He has in turn greatly influenced many anti-authoritarian and mystical movements, such as Radical Pietism (including the Ephrata Cloister and Society of the Woman in the Wilderness), the Religious Society of Friends, the Philadelphians, the Gichtelians, the Harmony Society, the Zoarite Separatists, Rosicrucianism, Martinism and Christian theosophy.
The foundation of Christian theosophy is usually attributed to the German philosopher Jakob Böhme.

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

HegelG. W. F. HegelG.W.F. Hegel
Hegel described Böhme as "the first German philosopher".
To this list, one could add Proclus, Meister Eckhart, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Plotinus, Jakob Böhme, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

Novalis

Friedrich von HardenbergGeorg Philipp Friedrich Freiherr von HardenbergNovalis (Friedrich von Hardenberg)
Poets such as John Milton, Ludwig Tieck, Novalis, William Blake and W. B. Yeats found inspiration in Böhme's writings.
Hardenberg's intensive study of the works of Jakob Böhme, from 1800, had a clear influence on his own writing.

Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling

SchellingFriedrich SchellingFriedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling
Böhme was also an important source of German Romantic philosophy, influencing Schelling and Franz von Baader in particular. Böhme was also an important source of German Romantic philosophy, influencing Schelling in particular.

Franz Hartmann

His works include several books on esoteric studies and biographies of Jakob Böhme and Paracelsus.

William Law

A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life
In his later years, Law became an admirer of the German Christian mystic Jakob Böhme.

Stary Zawidów

Alt Seidenberg
Böhme was born on 24 April 1575 at Alt Seidenberg (now Stary Zawidów, Poland), a village near Görlitz in Upper Lusatia, a territory of the Kingdom of Bohemia.
* Jakob Böhme (1575–1624), German Christian mystic and theologian

Valentin Weigel

WeigelianismValentine WeigelWeigel
He regularly prayed and read the Bible as well as works by visionaries such as Paracelsus, Weigel and Schwenckfeld, although he received no formal education.
He kept his ideas secret, entrusting them only to personal friends (in contrast to Jakob Böhme).

Sophia (wisdom)

SophiaWisdomSapientia
Leade was hugely influenced by the theosophical writings of sixteenth century German Christian mystic Jakob Böhme, who also speaks of the Sophia in works such as The Way to Christ (1624).