Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad

Tawhid and JihadAl-Tawhid Wal-JihadJama'at al-Tawhid wal JihadTawhid al-JihadAbu Musab al-Zarqawi's followersAl-Tawhid wa al-JihadJama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad (JTJ)Jamāʻat al-Tawḥīd wa-al-JihādJTJOrganization of Monotheism and Jihad
Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad (Organization of Monotheism and Jihad), which may be abbreviated as JTJ or Jama'at, was a militant Jihadist group.wikipedia
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Abu Musab al-Zarqawi

al-ZarqawiAbu Musab al ZarqawiZarqawi
It was founded in Jordan in 1999 and was led by Jordanian national Abu Musab al-Zarqawi for the entirety of its existence. Abu Musab al-Zarqawi was a Jordanian Jihadist who traveled to Afghanistan to fight in the Soviet–Afghan War, but arrived after the departure of the Soviet troops and soon returned to his homeland.
He formed al-Tawhid wal-Jihad in the 1990s, and led it until his death in June 2006.

Islamic State of Iraq

ISIal-Qaeda in IraqIslamic State
After several mergers with other groups, it changed its name several times until it called itself Islamic State of Iraq (ISI) in 2006.
Islamic State of Iraq traces its origins to Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad, which was formed by the Jordanian national Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in Jordan in 1999.

Iraqi insurgency (2003–2011)

Iraqi insurgencyIraqi insurgentsinsurgents
During the Iraqi insurgency (2003–11), the group became a decentralized network with foreign fighters and a considerable Iraqi membership.
Zarqawi was considered the head of an insurgent group called Al-Tawhid Wal-Jihad ("Monotheism and Holy War") until his death on 7 June 2006, which according to U.S. estimates numbers in the low hundreds.

Beheading in Islam

beheadingBeheading in Islamismbehead
Jama'at's tactics included suicide bombings, often using car bombs, kidnappings, the planting of improvised explosive devices, attacks using rocket-propelled grenades, small arms and mortars, and beheading Iraqi and foreign hostages and distributing video recordings of these acts on the Internet.
In recent times, non-state Jihadist organizations such as ISIS and Tawhid and Jihad have used beheading as a method of killing captives.

Canal Hotel bombing

bombingcar-bomb attackChris Klein-Beekman
Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the leader of terrorist organization Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad, in April 2004 claimed responsibility for the 19 August blast.

Al-Qaeda

Al Qaedaal-QaidaAl Qaida
On 17 October 2004, al-Zarqawi pledged allegiance to Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda network, and the group became known as Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn (commonly known as al-Qaeda in Iraq or Tanzim).
In Iraq, al-Qaeda forces loosely associated with the leadership were embedded in the Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad group commanded by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.

June 2004 Baghdad bombing

The suicide car bombing
None of the 175 would-be recruits or active U.S. and Iraqi servicemen were hurt in the attack for which Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad was blamed.

Kidnapping and murder of Kenneth Bigley

Kenneth BigleyKen BigleyBigley
On 18 September, the Tawhid and Jihad ("Oneness of God and Jihad") Islamic extremist group, led by Jordanian Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, released a video of the three men kneeling in front of a Tawhid and Jihad banner.

Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn

al-Qaeda in IraqAl Qaeda in Iraqal-Qaida in Iraq
On 17 October 2004, al-Zarqawi pledged allegiance to Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda network, and the group became known as Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn (commonly known as al-Qaeda in Iraq or Tanzim).
The group was founded by the Jordanian militant Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in 1999 under the name Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad (Arabic: جماعة التوحيد والجهاد, "Group of Monotheism and Jihad").

Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

ISISISILIslamic State
ISIL originated as Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad in 1999, which pledged allegiance to al-Qaeda and participated in the Iraqi insurgency following the 2003 invasion of Iraq by Western forces at the behest of the United States.

Kim Sun-il

On 30 May 2004, he was kidnapped in Fallujah — about 50 km west of Baghdad — by the Islamist group Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad and held as a hostage.

Ezzedine Salim

Izz al-Din SalimIzzadine SaleemIzzedine Salim
Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad claimed responsibility.

Iraqi insurgency (2003–2006)

Iraqi insurgentsIraqi insurgencyOther Iraqi insurgents
These events marked the emergence of the organization then known as Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad, led by al-Zarqawi, to prominence as a major force within the insurgency.

Iraq

Republic of IraqIraqiIrak
Various Sunni militias were created in 2003, for example Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad led by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.

Battle of Samarra (2004)

Battle of Samarra2004 Battle of SamarraOperation Baton Rouge

Jihadism

jihadistjihadijihadists
Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad (Organization of Monotheism and Jihad), which may be abbreviated as JTJ or Jama'at, was a militant Jihadist group. Abu Musab al-Zarqawi was a Jordanian Jihadist who traveled to Afghanistan to fight in the Soviet–Afghan War, but arrived after the departure of the Soviet troops and soon returned to his homeland.

Jordan

Hashemite Kingdom of JordanTransjordanKingdom of Jordan
It was founded in Jordan in 1999 and was led by Jordanian national Abu Musab al-Zarqawi for the entirety of its existence.

Bay'ah

oath of allegiancebayatbay'at
On 17 October 2004, al-Zarqawi pledged allegiance to Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda network, and the group became known as Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn (commonly known as al-Qaeda in Iraq or Tanzim).

Osama bin Laden

Bin LadenUsama bin LadenOsama
On 17 October 2004, al-Zarqawi pledged allegiance to Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda network, and the group became known as Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn (commonly known as al-Qaeda in Iraq or Tanzim).

Afghanistan

AfghanIslamic Republic of AfghanistanAfghans
Abu Musab al-Zarqawi was a Jordanian Jihadist who traveled to Afghanistan to fight in the Soviet–Afghan War, but arrived after the departure of the Soviet troops and soon returned to his homeland.