James B. Conant

James ConantDr. James Bryant ConantJim' ConantPresident Conant
James Bryant Conant (March 26, 1893 – February 11, 1978) was an American chemist, a transformative President of Harvard University, and the first U.S.wikipedia
396 Related Articles

Harvard University

HarvardHarvard CollegeHarvard University’s
James Bryant Conant (March 26, 1893 – February 11, 1978) was an American chemist, a transformative President of Harvard University, and the first U.S. Ambassador to West Germany.
James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and began to reform the curriculum and liberalize admissions after the war.

President of Harvard University

presidentPresident of HarvardPresident of Harvard College
James Bryant Conant (March 26, 1893 – February 11, 1978) was an American chemist, a transformative President of Harvard University, and the first U.S. Ambassador to West Germany.
Charles W. Eliot, for example, originated America's familiar system of a smorgasbord of elective courses available to each student; James B. Conant worked to introduce standardized testing; Derek Bok and Neil L. Rudenstine argued for the continued importance of diversity in higher education.

Trinity (nuclear test)

TrinityTrinity nuclear testTrinity test
On July 16, 1945, he was among the dignitaries present at the Alamogordo Bombing and Gunnery Range for the Trinity nuclear test, the first detonation of an atomic bomb, and was part of the Interim Committee that advised President Harry S. Truman to use atomic bombs on Japan.
Observers included Vannevar Bush, James Chadwick, James Conant, Thomas Farrell, Enrico Fermi, Richard Feynman, Leslie Groves, Robert Oppenheimer, Geoffrey Taylor, and Richard Tolman.

Manhattan Project

atomic bomb projectatomic bombdevelopment of the atomic bomb
In this capacity, he oversaw vital wartime research projects, including the development of synthetic rubber, and the Manhattan Project, which developed the first atomic bombs.
He in turn spoke to James B. Conant, Arthur H. Compton and George B. Pegram.

National Defense Research Committee

NDRCNational Defense Research council
Conant was appointed to the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) in 1940, becoming its chairman in 1941. In June 1940, with World War II already raging in Europe, Vannevar Bush, the director of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, recruited Conant to the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC), although he remained president of Harvard.
The original eight members of the NDRC were: Vannevar Bush, President of the Carnegie Institution (Chairman); Rear Admiral Harold G. Bowen, Sr.; Conway P. Coe, Commissioner of Patents; Karl Compton, President of MIT; James B. Conant, President of Harvard University; Frank B. Jewett, President of the National Academy of Sciences and President of Bell Telephone Laboratories; Brigadier General George V. Strong; and Richard C. Tolman, Professor of Physical Chemistry and Mathematical Physics at California Institute of Technology.

SAT

SAT Reasoning TestScholastic Aptitude TestScholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
His egalitarian vision of education required a diversified student body, and he promoted the adoption of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and co-educational classes.
In 1934, James Conant and Henry Chauncey used the SAT as a means to identify recipients for scholarships to Harvard University.

Interim Committee

On July 16, 1945, he was among the dignitaries present at the Alamogordo Bombing and Gunnery Range for the Trinity nuclear test, the first detonation of an atomic bomb, and was part of the Interim Committee that advised President Harry S. Truman to use atomic bombs on Japan.
The other members were: James F. Byrnes, former US Senator and soon to be Secretary of State, as President Truman's personal representative; Ralph A. Bard, Under Secretary of the Navy; William L. Clayton, Assistant Secretary of State; Vannevar Bush, Director of the Office of Scientific Research and Development and president of the Carnegie Institution; Karl T. Compton, Chief of the Office of Field Service in the Office of Scientific Research and Development and president of Massachusetts Institute of Technology; James B. Conant, Chairman of the National Defense Research Committee and president of Harvard University; and George L. Harrison, an assistant to Stimson and president of the New York Life Insurance Company.

Theodore William Richards

Theodore RichardsT. W. RichardsTheodore W. Richards
Encouraged by his science teacher, Newton H. Black, in September of that year he entered Harvard College, where he studied physical chemistry under Theodore W. Richards and organic chemistry under Elmer P. Kohler.
The couple had one daughter, Grace Thayer (who married James Bryant Conant), and two sons, Greenough Thayer and William Theodore.

List of ambassadors of the United States to Germany

U.S. Ambassador to GermanyAmbassador to GermanyAmbassador to West Germany
James Bryant Conant (March 26, 1893 – February 11, 1978) was an American chemist, a transformative President of Harvard University, and the first U.S. Ambassador to West Germany.

Roger Adams

They opened a plant in a one-story building in Queens, New York, where they manufactured chemicals used by the pharmaceutical industry like benzoic acid that were selling at high prices on account of the interruption of imports from Germany due to World War I. In 1916, the departure of organic chemist Roger Adams created a vacancy at Harvard that was offered to Conant.
Several other prominent contemporaries of Adams at Harvard Graduate School were Elmer Keiser Bolton, Farrington Daniels, Frank C. Whitmore, James B. Sumner and James Bryant Conant.

Roxbury Latin School

Roxbury LatinLatin
Conant was one of 35 boys who passed the competitive admission exam for the Roxbury Latin School in West Roxbury in 1904.
James Bryant Conant (1910), president of Harvard University, ambassador to Germany

Superacid

superacidssuper acid
Conant christened them "superacids" and laid the foundation for the development of the Hammett acidity function.
The term superacid was originally coined by James Bryant Conant in 1927 to describe acids that were stronger than conventional mineral acids.

Alpha Chi Sigma

He joined the Signet Society and Delta Upsilon, and was initiated as a brother of the Omicron Chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma in 1912.
James Bryant Conant, Omicron '12, (1944). Early contributor to physical organic chemistry, President of Harvard University from 1933 to 1953, oversaw the Manhattan Project, winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Priestley Medal

Priestly Medal
For his accomplishments in chemistry, he was awarded the American Chemical Society's Nichols Medal in 1932, Columbia University's Chandler Medal in 1932, and the American Chemical Society's highest honor, the Priestley Medal, in 1944.
1944 James Bryant Conant

George Kistiakowsky

George B. KistiakowskiGeorge B. KistiakowskyGeorge Bogdan Kistiakowsky
A combination of Conant's work on the kinetics of hydrogenation and George Kistiakowsky's work on the enthalpy changes of these reactions supported the later development of the theory of hyperconjugation.
James B. Conant, the President of Harvard, was appointed head of Division B, which was responsible for bombs, fuels, gases and chemicals.

Paul Doughty Bartlett

Paul D. BartlettPaul D. Barlett
Notable students of Conant's included Paul Doughty Bartlett, George Wheland, and Frank Westheimer.
After his graduation from Harvard with James Bryant Conant, Bartlett worked at the Rockefeller Institute and the University of Minnesota.

Stan Pennock

In 1915, Conant entered into a business partnership with two other Harvard chemistry graduates, Stanley Pennock and Chauncey Loomis, to form the LPC Laboratories.
He entered into a business partnership with two other Harvard graduates, James Bryant Conant and Chauncey Loomis, and formed the LPC Laboratories.

Frank Westheimer

F. H. WestheimerFrank H. WestheimerFrank Henry Westheimer
Notable students of Conant's included Paul Doughty Bartlett, George Wheland, and Frank Westheimer.
Westheimer came to Harvard hoping to do research with James Bryant Conant.

Signet society

Signet
He joined the Signet Society and Delta Upsilon, and was initiated as a brother of the Omicron Chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma in 1912.
James B. Conant, Harvard President, scholar, chemist

Allied High Commission

High CommissionerU.S. High CommissionerAllied High Commission for Occupied Germany
In 1953 he retired as President of Harvard and became the United States High Commissioner for Germany, overseeing the restoration of German sovereignty after World War II, and then was Ambassador to West Germany until 1957.

Grenville Clark

Clark
"But", Corporation member Grenville Clark reminded him, "Eliot was a chemist, and our best president too."
In 1933, he was instrumental in having James Bryant Conant elected president of Harvard University; the two become close friends.

Frederick L. Hovde

Fred Hovde
In February 1941, Roosevelt sent Conant to Britain as head of a mission that also included Frederick L. Hovde from Purdue University and Carroll L. Wilson from MIT, to evaluate the research being carried out there and the prospects for cooperation.
In 1942, he returned to the National Defense Research Committee as Executive Assistant to James Bryant Conant, its chairman.

Vannevar Bush

Bush, Vannevar Bush, VannevarBush
In June 1940, with World War II already raging in Europe, Vannevar Bush, the director of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, recruited Conant to the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC), although he remained president of Harvard.
Bush appointed four leading scientists to the NDRC: Karl Taylor Compton (president of MIT), James B. Conant (president of Harvard University), Frank B. Jewett (president of the National Academy of Sciences and chairman of the Board of Directors of Bell Laboratories), and Richard C. Tolman (dean of the graduate school at Caltech); Rear Admiral Harold G. Bowen, Sr. and Brigadier General George V. Strong represented the military.

A. Lawrence Lowell

Abbott Lawrence LowellAbbot Lawrence LowellAbbott Lowell
The President of Harvard, Abbott Lawrence Lowell, made a counter offer: immediate promotion to professor, effective September 1, 1927, with a salary of $7,000 (roughly equivalent to as of 2019) and a grant of $9,000 per annum for research.

Thomas Kuhn

KuhnThomas S. KuhnKuhn, Thomas S.
Conant's ideas about scientific progress would come under attack by his own protégés, notably Thomas Kuhn in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.
He later taught a course in the history of science at Harvard from 1948 until 1956, at the suggestion of university president James Conant.