James Dobson

Dr. James DobsonJames C. DobsonDobsonDr. DobsonDr. James C. DobsonFamily TalkJames (Jim) Dobson
James "Jim" Clayton Dobson, Jr. (born April 21, 1936) is an American evangelical Christian author, psychologist, and founder in 1977 of Focus on the Family (FOTF), which he led until 2010.wikipedia
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Focus on the Family

Plugged InFocus on the Family Radio TheatrePluggedIn
James "Jim" Clayton Dobson, Jr. (born April 21, 1936) is an American evangelical Christian author, psychologist, and founder in 1977 of Focus on the Family (FOTF), which he led until 2010.
Focus on the Family (FOTF or FotF) is an American fundamentalist Christian organization founded in 1977 in Southern California by James Dobson, based in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Family Research Council

FRCFamily Research Council (FRC)FRC Action
Dobson founded the Family Research Council in 1981.
FRC was formed in the United States in 1981 by James Dobson and incorporated in 1983.

Jim Daly (evangelist)

Jim DalyJohn Daly
Dobson explained his departure as a result of "significant philosophical differences" with successor Jim Daly.
He succeeded founder James Dobson in 2005.

Point Loma Nazarene University

Pasadena CollegePoint Loma CollegePoint Loma Nazarene
He attended Pasadena College (now Point Loma Nazarene University) as an undergraduate and served as captain of the school's tennis team.
Notable alumni include Edward J. Blakely, educator and researcher on urban and suburban issues, James Dobson, prominent evangelical psychologist, Greg Laswell, musician and producer, and Mildred Bangs Wynkoop, noted Nazarene theologian.

SpongeBob SquarePants (character)

SpongeBob SquarePantsSpongeBobthe title character
In the winter of 2004-2005, the We Are Family Foundation sent American elementary schools approximately 60,000 copies of a free DVD using popular cartoon characters (most notably SpongeBob SquarePants) to "promote tolerance and diversity."
SpongeBob appeared in a We Are Family Foundation video promoting tolerance, which was criticized by James Dobson of Focus on the Family because of the foundation's link to homosexuality.

Church of the Nazarene

NazareneNazarenesNazarene Church
He is the son, grandson, and great-grandson of Church of the Nazarene ministers, although he does not speak for the denomination in any capacity.

Marriage Under Fire

In his 2004 book Marriage Under Fire, Dobson suggests that heterosexual marriage rates in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden have been falling, and that this is due to the recognition of same-sex relationships by those countries during the 1990s.
Marriage Under Fire is a 2004 Evangelical Christian book by James Dobson about the same-sex marriage movement from an opponent's point of view.

Ted Bundy

Susan CurtisTheodore BundyBundy
Dobson interviewed serial killer Ted Bundy on-camera the day before Bundy's execution on January 24, 1989.
On the afternoon before he was executed, Bundy granted an interview to James Dobson, a psychologist and founder of the Christian evangelical organization Focus on the Family.

Indiana Wesleyan University

Indiana WesleyanMarion CollegeIndiana Wesleyan University (Lexington campus)
In 2005, Dobson received an honorary doctorate (his 16th ) from Indiana Wesleyan University and was inducted into IWU's Society of World Changers, while speaking at the university's Academic Convocation.

Paul Popenoe

Paul B. Popenoe
For a time, Dobson worked as an assistant to Paul Popenoe at the Institute of Family Relations, a marriage-counseling center, in Los Angeles.
For example, one of his assistants was James Dobson, who founded Focus on the Family in 1977.

Love Won Out

Focus on the Family ministry sponsors the monthly conference Love Won Out, where participants hear "powerful stories of ex-gay men and women."
The psychologist James Dobson adds that God loves the homosexual as much as any other person.

Anne Heche

Ann Heche
He anecdotally cites as evidence the life of actress Anne Heche, who was previously in a relationship with Ellen DeGeneres.
Since her husband's death from AIDS, Nancy has been a Christian therapist and motivational speaker, who lectures on behalf of James Dobson's Focus on the Family about "overcoming homosexuality".

Christian right

religious rightconservative ChristianChristian conservative
Further, "He's already leveraging his new power. When a thank-you call came from the White House, Dobson issued the staffer a blunt warning that Bush 'needs to be more aggressive' about pressing the religious right's pro-life, anti-gay rights agenda, or it would 'pay a price in four years.' ... Dobson has sometimes complained that the Republican Party may take the votes of social conservatives for granted, and has suggested that evangelicals may withhold support from the GOP if the party does not more strongly support conservative family issues: "Does the Republican Party want our votes, no string attached—to court us every two years, and then to say, 'Don't call me, I'll call you'—and not to care about the moral law of the universe?
Led by Robert Grant advocacy group Christian Voice, Jerry Falwell's Moral Majority, Ed McAteer's Religious Roundtable Council, James Dobson's Focus on the Family, Paul Weyrich's Free Congress Foundation and The Heritage Foundation, and Pat Robertson's Christian Broadcasting Network, the new Religious Right combined conservative politics with evangelical and fundamentalist teachings.

Colorado Right to Life

On June 13, 2007, the National Right to Life Committee ousted Colorado Right to Life after the latter ran a full-page ad criticizing Dobson.
The open letter, paid for by independent donors, asked Focus on the Family chairman James Dobson to retract his statement that the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in favor of upholding the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act in the case Gonzales v. Carhart was a positive outcome for the pro-life movement.

Meese Report

Meese CommissionAttorney General's Commission on PornographyCommission on Pornography

Manhattan Declaration: A Call of Christian Conscience

Manhattan Declaration
In November 2009, Dobson signed an ecumenical statement known as the Manhattan Declaration calling on evangelicals, Catholics and Eastern Orthodox Christians not to comply with rules and laws permitting abortion, same-sex marriage and other matters that go against their religious consciences.

Richard Cizik

In 2007, Dobson was one of 25 evangelicals who called for the ouster of Rev. Richard Cizik from his position at the National Association of Evangelicals because Cizik had taken a stance urging evangelicals to take global warming seriously.
In March 2007, James Dobson, head of Focus on the Family, and 24 other evangelical leaders signed a letter asking "the NAE board to ensure that Mr. Cizik faithfully represents the policies and commitments of the organization, including its defense of traditional values," and suggesting that Cizik resign "if he cannot be trusted to articulate the views of American evangelicals on environmental issues."

National Day of Prayer

National Day of Prayer (US)National Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving, 2001National Day of Prayer, 2017
At a National Day of Prayer event in the U.S. Capitol, Dobson called Barack Obama "the abortion president."
On October 3, 2008, the Wisconsin-based organization filed suit in the federal district court for western Wisconsin in Madison, naming as defendants President George W. Bush; White House press secretary Dana Perino; Wisconsin governor Jim Doyle; and evangelist James Dobson's wife, Shirley Dobson, in her capacity as chair of the National Day of Prayer Task Force.

National Right to Life Committee

National Right to LifeNRLCAmerican Citizens Concerned for Life
On June 13, 2007, the National Right to Life Committee ousted Colorado Right to Life after the latter ran a full-page ad criticizing Dobson.
In 2007, Colorado Citizens for Life successfully challenged Colorado Right to Life's affiliation and representation to the NRLC Board, after Colorado Right to Life ran a full-page ad in The Gazette criticizing the founder of Focus on the Family, James Dobson and co-signed a series of open letters to Dr. James Dobson exposing that the Gonzales v Carhart U.S. Supreme Court ruling on partial-birth abortion (PBA) is not even a hollow victory for anti-abortionists.

Evangelicalism

evangelicalevangelical ChristianEvangelicals
James "Jim" Clayton Dobson, Jr. (born April 21, 1936) is an American evangelical Christian author, psychologist, and founder in 1977 of Focus on the Family (FOTF), which he led until 2010.

Psychologist

psychologistsclinical psychologistresearch psychologist
James "Jim" Clayton Dobson, Jr. (born April 21, 1936) is an American evangelical Christian author, psychologist, and founder in 1977 of Focus on the Family (FOTF), which he led until 2010.

Minister (Christianity)

ministerministersministry
Although never an ordained minister, he was called "the nation's most influential evangelical leader" by The New York Times while Slate portrayed him as a successor to evangelical leaders Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson.

The New York Times

New York TimesNY TimesNYT
Although never an ordained minister, he was called "the nation's most influential evangelical leader" by The New York Times while Slate portrayed him as a successor to evangelical leaders Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson.

Slate (magazine)

SlateSlate MagazineSlate.com
Although never an ordained minister, he was called "the nation's most influential evangelical leader" by The New York Times while Slate portrayed him as a successor to evangelical leaders Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson.

Jerry Falwell

Rev. Jerry FalwellJerry Falwell MinistriesFalwell
Although never an ordained minister, he was called "the nation's most influential evangelical leader" by The New York Times while Slate portrayed him as a successor to evangelical leaders Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson.