Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives
James Jay Archer
Northeastern Virginia (1862)
James J. Archer
Second Bull Run Campaign, August 17–30, 1862 (Additional map).
Gettysburg Marker to Archer's C. S. A.
ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA-HILLS CORPS HETH'S DIVISION-ARCHER'S BRIGADE
5th Battalion and 13th Alabama 1st 7th 14th Tennessee Infantry
July 1. The Brigade moved from Cashtown early in the morning towards Gettysburg. After a march of six miles came in view of the Union forces. The Brigade was deployed on the west side of Willoughby Run and about 10 A. M. advanced encountered 1st Brigade First Division beyond the run. The firing continued for a short time when a large force appearing on the right flank and opening a cross fire the position became untenable the Brigade was forced back across the run but advanced with the Division later in the day. The advance in the morning reached this position.
July 2. Not engaged.
July 3. Formed part of the column of Longstreet's assault.
July 4. The Brigade took up the line of march during the night to Hagerstown.
Battlefield of Manassas (right side)
Action at Brawner's Farm, August 28
August 29, 10 a.m.: Sigel's attack
August 29, 12 noon: Longstreet arrives, Porter stalls
August 29, 3 p.m.: Grover's attack
August 29, 5–7 p.m., Kearny's attack, Hood vs. Hatch
Stonewall Jackson's cannons on Henry House Hill
August 30, 3 p.m., Porter's attack
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
August 30, 4:30 p.m.: Union defense of Chinn Ridge
August 30, 5 p.m.: Final Confederate attacks, beginning of the Union retreat
Bridge crossed by the Union troops retreating to Centreville
Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862
Union troops retreat after the battle
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<center>Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862</center>
<center>Virginia, Bull Run. Ruins of Stone Bridge, 1862</center>
<center>A group of men stand near the Manassas Railroad Junction railroad tracks in 1862 with a train in the background</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>Men sit near the Manassas Junction railroad in 1862</center>
<center>Picking up debris of trains after Pope's retreat</center>
<center>Bull Run, Va. Dedication of the battle monument; Judge Abram B. Olin of the District of Columbia Supreme Court, who delivered the address, stands by the rail.</center>
Battle map drafted by Sneden, Robert Knox, with notes on Union and Confederate strengths, casualties, done in pen and ink and water color
Northern Virginia Campaign, August 7–28, 1862 Confederate
Union

Soon, two more regiments were added to Archer's brigade, which fought well in the Seven Days Battles, at Cedar Mountain, and at Second Bull Run, where his horse was killed under him.

- James J. Archer

Maj. Gen. A. P. Hill (brigades of Brig Gen. Lawrence O. Branch, Brig Gen. William D. Pender, Col. Edward L. Thomas, Brig Gen. Maxcy Gregg, Brig Gen. James J. Archer, Brig Gen. Charles W. Field and Lt. Col. R. Lindsay Walker)

- Second Battle of Bull Run
Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives

4 related topics with Alpha

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A. P. Hill

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Confederate general who was killed in the American Civil War.

Confederate general who was killed in the American Civil War.

General A.P. Hill
Appomattox, A. P. Hill's sword
Portrait of Hill by William Ludwell Sheppard, 1898

After the start of the American Civil War, he gained early fame as the commander of the "Light Division" in the Seven Days Battles and became one of Stonewall Jackson's ablest subordinates, distinguishing himself in the 1862 battles of Cedar Mountain, Second Bull Run, Antietam, and Fredericksburg.

After the battle one of his brigade commanders, Brig. Gen. James J. Archer, criticized him about the gap left in the division's front line, saying that Hill had been warned about it before the battle but had done nothing to correct it.

Northern Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, 1861–1865

Battle of Gettysburg

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Fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.

Fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.

Northern Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, 1861–1865
The Gettysburg Campaign, 1863
The Battlefield of Gettysburg, 1863
This 1863 oval-shaped map depicts the Gettysburg Battlefield during July 1–3, 1863, showing troop and artillery positions and movements, relief hachures, drainage, roads, railroads, and houses with the names of residents at the time of the Battle of Gettysburg.
This November 1862 Harper's Magazine illustration shows Confiderate Army troops escorting captured African American civilians south into slavery. En route to Gettysburg, the Army of Northern Virginia kidnapped approximately 40 black civilians and sent them south into slavery.
Overview map of the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg
Marker commemorating the first shot fired at the Battle of Gettysburg at 7:30 am on July 1, 1863 by Lt. Marcellus Jones
Robert E. Lee's plan for July 2, 1863, the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg
Overview map of the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863
Union Army breastworks on Culp's Hill, 1863
Overview map of the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863
The high water mark on Cemetery Ridge with the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry Monument commemorating the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment at right and the Copse of Trees to the left, August 2005
"The Harvest of Death": Union dead on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, photographed July 5 or July 6, 1863, by Timothy H. O'Sullivan
John L. Burns, veteran of the War of 1812, civilian who fought at the Battle of Gettysburg with Union troops, standing with bayoneted musket. Mathew Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries, photographer. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
Gettysburg Campaign (July 5 – July 14, 1863)
On November 19, 1863, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address, considered one of the best-known speeches in American history. A crowd of citizens and soldiers surround Lincoln (with a red arrow pointing to his location in photo)
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Gettysburg National Cemetery, July 2003
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The 1936 Battle of Gettysburg half dollar
Gettysburg Centennial Commemorative issue of 1963
Gettysburg Campaign (through July 3) with cavalry movements shown with dashed lines Confederate
Union

Heth's division advanced with two brigades forward, commanded by brigadier generals James J. Archer and Joseph R. Davis.

Prior to Gettysburg, Robert E. Lee had established a reputation as an almost invincible general, achieving stunning victories against superior numbers—although usually at the cost of high casualties to his army—during the Seven Days, the Northern Virginia Campaign (including the Second Battle of Bull Run), Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville.

George B. McClellan and Robert E. Lee, respective commanders of the Union and Confederate armies in the Seven Days

Seven Days Battles

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The Seven Days Battles were a series of seven battles over seven days from June 25 to July 1, 1862, near Richmond, Virginia, during the American Civil War.

The Seven Days Battles were a series of seven battles over seven days from June 25 to July 1, 1862, near Richmond, Virginia, during the American Civil War.

George B. McClellan and Robert E. Lee, respective commanders of the Union and Confederate armies in the Seven Days
Seven Days Battles: map of events (left side)
Map of Southeastern Virginia
Map of Southeastern Virginia (additional map)
Seven Days Battles, June 26&ndash;27, 1862
Seven Days Battles, June 30, 1862
Seven Days Battles, July 1, 1862
<center>Brig. Gen. Edwin V. Sumner</center>
<center>Brig. Gen. Samuel P. Heintzelman</center>
<center>Brig. Gen. Erasmus D. Keyes</center>
<center>Brig. Gen. Fitz John Porter</center>
<center>Brig. Gen. William B. Franklin</center>
<center>Brig. Gen. Philip St. George Cooke</center>
<center>Maj. Gen. Stonewall Jackson</center>
<center>Maj. Gen. James Longstreet</center>
<center>Maj. Gen. John B. Magruder</center>
<center>Maj. Gen. A. P. Hill</center>
<center>Maj. Gen. Benjamin Huger</center>
<center>Maj. Gen. Theophilus H. Holmes</center>
Map of events during the Peninsula campaign to the Battle of Seven Pines
Confederate
Union

Maj. Gen. A.P. Hill's "Light Division" (which was so named because it traveled light and was able to maneuver and strike quickly) consisted of the brigades of Brig. Gens. Charles W. Field, Maxcy Gregg, Joseph R. Anderson, Lawrence O'Bryan Branch, James J. Archer, and William Dorsey Pender.

Despite heavy casualties, which the less-populated South could ill afford, and clumsy tactical performances by Lee and his generals, Confederate morale skyrocketed, and Lee was emboldened to continue his aggressive strategy through the Second Battle of Bull Run and the Maryland Campaign.

Iron Brigade unit badge, a maltese cross design, showing the Wisconsin, Michigan, and Indiana, Union Army regiments, who were the core of the Brigade, on a historical marker, at Gettysburg National Military Park.

Iron Brigade

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Infantry brigade in the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War.

Infantry brigade in the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War.

Iron Brigade unit badge, a maltese cross design, showing the Wisconsin, Michigan, and Indiana, Union Army regiments, who were the core of the Brigade, on a historical marker, at Gettysburg National Military Park.
Union Army soldiers in the 7th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company I, of the Iron Brigade, in Virginia, 1862
Rufus King, the founder and original commander of the Wisconsin Iron Brigade
John Gibbon, the commander of the combined three-state Western Iron Brigade
The black wool hardee hat was most famously worn and easily identified as the hat worn by the Union Army's "Iron Brigade of the West", which became their trademark. They were popularly known by the nickname "The Black Hats".
Union Army soldiers, from the 2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company C, of the Iron Brigade, wearing a mix of blue and gray uniforms and the distinctive hardee hats. The state militia uniforms were eventually replaced to avoid being mistaken as Confederate soldiers. From a rare, degraded, tintype photograph, circa 1861.
24th Michigan Monument, Gettysburg National Military Park
The Iron Brigade prepared for battle, at Gettysburg, by anchoring the Union Army's southern flank, 10:00&ndash;10:45 a.m., on Day 1.
Death of General John F. Reynolds as he supervised the deployment of the Iron Brigade early on the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg

On August 28, 1862, during the preliminary phases of the Second Battle of Bull Run, it stood up against attacks from a superior force under Maj. Gen Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson on the Brawner farm.

It repulsed the first Confederate offensive through Herbst's Woods, capturing much of Brig. Gen. James J. Archer's brigade, and Archer himself.