Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives
Northeastern Virginia (1862)
Antebellum portrait of Longstreet
Second Bull Run Campaign, August 17–30, 1862 (Additional map).
Sketch of Longstreet as a Confederate
Battlefield of Manassas (right side)
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
Action at Brawner's Farm, August 28
Longstreet circa 1862
August 29, 10 a.m.: Sigel's attack
A map of the Battle of Fredericksburg
August 29, 12 noon: Longstreet arrives, Porter stalls
Longstreet at Gettysburg c. undefined 1900
August 29, 3 p.m.: Grover's attack
Gettysburg, July 2
August 29, 5–7 p.m., Kearny's attack, Hood vs. Hatch
Pickett's Charge, July 3
Stonewall Jackson's cannons on Henry House Hill
Longstreet's Left Wing assaults, mid-day September 20
August 30, 3 p.m., Porter's attack
Carte de Visite portrait of Longstreet
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
James Longstreet after the war
August 30, 4:30 p.m.: Union defense of Chinn Ridge
James Longstreet after the war
August 30, 5 p.m.: Final Confederate attacks, beginning of the Union retreat
James Longstreet in later life (1896), affecting the sideburns of his opponent at Fredericksburg and Knoxville
Bridge crossed by the Union troops retreating to Centreville
Longstreet's grave
Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862
Equestrian statue of General Longstreet on his horse Hero in Pitzer Woods at Gettysburg National Military Park
Union troops retreat after the battle
Map of events during the Peninsula campaign to the Battle of Seven Pines Confederate
Union
<center>Maj. Gen.
Longstreet's attack in the Battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864, shortly before he was wounded Confederate
Union
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
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<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
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<center>Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862</center>
<center>Virginia, Bull Run. Ruins of Stone Bridge, 1862</center>
<center>A group of men stand near the Manassas Railroad Junction railroad tracks in 1862 with a train in the background</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>Men sit near the Manassas Junction railroad in 1862</center>
<center>Picking up debris of trains after Pope's retreat</center>
<center>Bull Run, Va. Dedication of the battle monument; Judge Abram B. Olin of the District of Columbia Supreme Court, who delivered the address, stands by the rail.</center>
Battle map drafted by Sneden, Robert Knox, with notes on Union and Confederate strengths, casualties, done in pen and ink and water color
Northern Virginia Campaign, August 7–28, 1862 Confederate
Union

Following a wide-ranging flanking march, Confederate Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson captured the Union supply depot at Manassas Junction, threatening Pope's line of communications with Washington, D.C. Withdrawing a few miles to the northwest, Jackson took up strong concealed defensive positions on Stony Ridge and awaited the arrival of the wing of Lee's army commanded by Maj. Gen. James Longstreet.

- Second Battle of Bull Run

Longstreet led a devastating counterattack that routed the Union army at Second Bull Run in August.

- James Longstreet
Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives

32 related topics with Alpha

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James B. Ricketts

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Career officer in the United States Army, serving as a Union Army general during the Civil War.

Career officer in the United States Army, serving as a Union Army general during the Civil War.

James and Fannie Ricketts

He fought at Second Bull Run and Antietam, where he was badly injured when his horse fell on him.

At Second Bull Run, his division was thrown forward by McDowell into Thoroughfare Gap to bar the advance of James Longstreet, who was seeking to unite his wing with that of Stonewall Jackson.

Cadmus M. Wilcox

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Career United States Army officer who served in the Mexican–American War and also was a Confederate general during the American Civil War.

Career United States Army officer who served in the Mexican–American War and also was a Confederate general during the American Civil War.

Wilcox as US Army second lieutenant
Attack by Anderson's division, July 2
Wilcox in later life

The brigade was assigned to Maj. Gen. James Longstreet's division of the First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.

He led it to Second Bull Run, but was held in reserve and saw no serious action.

Longstreet's troops march through the Gap

Battle of Thoroughfare Gap

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The Battle of Thoroughfare Gap, also known as Chapman's Mill, took place on August 28, 1862, in Fauquier County and Prince William County, Virginia, as part of the Northern Virginia Campaign of the American Civil War.

The Battle of Thoroughfare Gap, also known as Chapman's Mill, took place on August 28, 1862, in Fauquier County and Prince William County, Virginia, as part of the Northern Virginia Campaign of the American Civil War.

Longstreet's troops march through the Gap
Map of Thoroughfare Gap Battlefield core and study areas by the American Battlefield Protection Program

Confederate forces under Maj. Gen. James Longstreet successfully drove back Union forces under Brig. Gen. James B. Ricketts and Col. Percy Wyndham, allowing his corps to unite with that of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson prior to the Second Battle of Bull Run (Second Manassas).

Lewis Armistead

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Career United States Army officer who became a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.

Career United States Army officer who became a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.

This monument on the Gettysburg Battlefield marks the approximate place where Armistead was mortally wounded. The wall behind the monument marks the Union lines.

He fought as a brigade commander at Seven Pines, and then under General Robert E. Lee in the Seven Days Battles (where he was chosen to spearhead the bloody assault on Malvern Hill), and Second Bull Run.

Because he was with Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's First Corps near Norfolk, Virginia, in the spring of 1863, he missed the Battle of Chancellorsville.

George T. Anderson

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General in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.

General in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.

He saw battle during the Peninsula Campaign at Yorktown and commanded a brigade during the Seven Days Battles, Second Bull Run, Fox's Gap, Antietam, and Fredericksburg.

Anderson missed Chancellorsville being with the majority of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's First Corps operating in southeastern Virginia.

William Dorsey Pender

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General in the Confederacy in the American Civil War serving as a Brigade and Divisional commander.

General in the Confederacy in the American Civil War serving as a Brigade and Divisional commander.

He was wounded in the arm at the Battle of Glendale, but recovered quickly enough to rejoin his brigade and fight at Cedar Mountain, Second Manassas (where he received a minor head wound from an exploding shell), Harpers Ferry, and Battle of Sharpsburg.

During the en echelon attack that started with James Longstreet's assault on the right, from the Round Tops through the Peach Orchard, Pender's division was to continue in the attack sequence near Cemetery Hill, to the left of Maj. Gen. Richard H. Anderson's attack on Cemetery Ridge.

Roger Atkinson Pryor

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Virginian newspaper editor and politician who became known for his fiery oratory in favor of secession; he was elected both to national and Confederate office, and served as a general for the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.

Virginian newspaper editor and politician who became known for his fiery oratory in favor of secession; he was elected both to national and Confederate office, and served as a general for the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.

Pryor in his younger years.
Pryor looking at a portrait of Abraham Lincoln.

His brigade fought in the Peninsula Campaign and at Second Manassas, where it became detached in the swirling fighting and temporarily operated under Stonewall Jackson.

At Antietam on September 17, 1862, he assumed command of Anderson's Division in Longstreet's Corps when Maj. Gen. Richard H. Anderson was wounded.

James L. Kemper

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Lawyer, a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and the 37th Governor of Virginia.

Lawyer, a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and the 37th Governor of Virginia.

His regiment was later assigned to Brigadier General A.P. Hill's brigade in Major General James Longstreet's division of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia.

At the Second Battle of Bull Run, Kemper's division took part in Longstreet's surprise attack against the Union left flank, almost destroying Major General John Pope's Army of Virginia.

General Kearny's gallant charge

Battle of Chantilly

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The Battle of Chantilly (or Ox Hill, the Confederate name) took place on September 1, 1862, in Fairfax County, Virginia, as the concluding battle of the Northern Virginia Campaign of the American Civil War.

The Battle of Chantilly (or Ox Hill, the Confederate name) took place on September 1, 1862, in Fairfax County, Virginia, as the concluding battle of the Northern Virginia Campaign of the American Civil War.

General Kearny's gallant charge
Map of the battle
The death of General Kearny
Ox Hill Battlefield Park, with monuments to Stevens and Kearny

Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's corps of the Army of Northern Virginia attempted to cut off the line of retreat of the Union Army of Virginia following the Second Battle of Bull Run but was attacked by two Union divisions.

Maj. Gen. James Longstreet's command would remain in place for the day to deceive Pope into believing that Lee's entire force remained in his front, while Jackson's command made its flanking march, north and then east, to take strategically important Germantown, Virginia, where Pope's only two routes to Washington—the Warrenton Pike (modern U.S. Route 29) and the Little River Turnpike (modern U.S. Route 50)—converged.

Micah Jenkins, photo taken between April 1861 and July 1862

Micah Jenkins

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Confederate general in the American Civil War, mortally wounded by friendly fire at the Battle of the Wilderness.

Confederate general in the American Civil War, mortally wounded by friendly fire at the Battle of the Wilderness.

Micah Jenkins, photo taken between April 1861 and July 1862

He was later wounded at the Second Battle of Bull Run in August 1862, this time in the shoulder and chest.

Pickett's division participated in the campaign of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet against Suffolk, Virginia, in 1863, but Jenkins' brigade was retained near Richmond, Virginia, missing the Battle of Gettysburg.