James Moody (saxophonist)

James MoodyJames Moody,Moody, James
James Moody (March 26, 1925 – December 9, 2010) was an American jazz saxophone and flute player and very occasional vocalist, playing predominantly in the bebop and hard bop styles.wikipedia
430 Related Articles

Moody's Mood for Love

Moody's Mood
Moody had an unexpected hit with "Moody's Mood for Love," a 1952 song written by Eddie Jefferson that used as its melody an improvised solo that Moody had played on a 1949 recording of "I'm in the Mood for Love."
"Moody's Mood for Love" is a 1952 song by Eddie Jefferson, whose melody is derived from an improvised solo by jazz saxophonist James Moody on a 1949 recording of the 1935 song "I'm in the Mood for Love".

Moody's Mood for Love (album)

Moody's Mood for Love
Moody adopted the song as his own, recording it with Jefferson on his 1956 album Moody's Mood for Love and performing the song regularly in concert, often singing the vocals himself.
Moody's Mood for Love is an album by saxophonist James Moody recorded in 1956 and released on the Argo label.

Bebop

bopbe-bopmodern jazz
James Moody (March 26, 1925 – December 9, 2010) was an American jazz saxophone and flute player and very occasional vocalist, playing predominantly in the bebop and hard bop styles. Following his discharge from the military in 1946 he played bebop with Dizzy Gillespie for two years.
Some of the most influential bebop artists, who were typically composer-performers, are: tenor sax players Dexter Gordon, Sonny Rollins, and James Moody; alto sax player Charlie Parker; clarinet player Buddy DeFranco; trumpeters Fats Navarro, Clifford Brown, and Dizzy Gillespie; pianists Bud Powell, Mary Lou Williams, and Thelonious Monk; electric guitarist Charlie Christian, and drummers Kenny Clarke, Max Roach, and Art Blakey.

I'm in the Mood for Love

Moody had an unexpected hit with "Moody's Mood for Love," a 1952 song written by Eddie Jefferson that used as its melody an improvised solo that Moody had played on a 1949 recording of "I'm in the Mood for Love."

Blue Note Records

Blue NoteBlue Note Label GroupBlue Note
In 1948 he recorded his first session for Blue Note Records, the first in a long recording career playing both saxophone and flute.
Other bebop or modernist musicians who recorded for Blue Note during the late forties and early fifties were pianist Tadd Dameron, trumpeters Fats Navarro and Howard McGhee, saxophonist James Moody and pianist Bud Powell.

Renee Rosnes

The James Moody Quartet (with pianist Renee Rosnes, bassist Todd Coolman, and drummer Adam Nussbaum) was Moody's vehicle later in his career.
In 1989, she also began working with tenor saxophonist James Moody and was the pianist in his quartet for the next 20 years.

Dizzy Gillespie

GillespieDizzie GillespieDizzy
Following his discharge from the military in 1946 he played bebop with Dizzy Gillespie for two years.
After his work with Parker, Gillespie led other small combos (including ones with Milt Jackson, John Coltrane, Lalo Schifrin, Ray Brown, Kenny Clarke, James Moody, J.J. Johnson, and Yusef Lateef) and put together his successful big bands starting in 1947.

Lionel Hampton

Lionel Hampton OrchestraLionel Hampton and his OrchestraHampton
Also featured Big Jay McNeely, Lionel Hampton and his Orchestra, The Medallions and The Penguins.
His final Cavalcade of Jazz concert held on July 24, 1955 (Eleventh) also featured Big Jay McNeely, The Medallions, The Penguins and James Moody and his Orchestra.

Newark, New Jersey

NewarkNewark, NJCity of Newark
Growing up in Newark, New Jersey, he was attracted to the saxophone after hearing George Holmes Tate, Don Byas, and various saxophonists who played with Count Basie, and later also took up the flute.
Festivals and parades held annually or bi-annually include the Cherry Blossom Festival (April) in Branch Brook Park, the Portugal Day Festival (June) in the Ironbound, the McDonald's Gospelfest (spring) at Prudential Center, the Lincoln Park Music Festival (July) at Lincoln Park, the Newark Black Film Festival (summer) and Paul Robeson Awards (biennial), the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival (October, biennial) at various venues and the citywide Open Doors (October), the Afro Beat Fest (July) at Military Park, and the James Moody Jazz Festival, named for James Moody, the jazz artist raised in Newark (week-long event in November).

Moody 4B

Two months after his death, Moody won the Grammy Award posthumously for Best Jazz Instrumental Album for his album Moody 4B.
Moody 4B is an instrumental album released by jazz musician James Moody.

Pee Wee Moore

Sol Moore
Then in 1952, he returned to the U.S. to a recording career with Prestige Records and others, playing flute and saxophone in bands that included musicians such as Pee Wee Moore and others.
He worked with Illinois Jacquet in 1952 and James Moody in 1954-56, then played with Dizzy Gillespie in 1957, recording with him on several albums for Verve Records.

Eddie Jefferson

Jefferson, Eddie
Moody had an unexpected hit with "Moody's Mood for Love," a 1952 song written by Eddie Jefferson that used as its melody an improvised solo that Moody had played on a 1949 recording of "I'm in the Mood for Love."

Moody (album)

MoodyMoody'' (album)Moody's Workshop
Moody (also released as Moody's Workshop) is an album by saxophonist James Moody composed of sessions from 1954 with a septet arranged by Quincy Jones which were released on the Prestige label.

New Sounds

James Moody and his Modernists
New Sounds was originally a 10" LP compiling previously released 78 rpm records on the Blue Note label. A CD reissue with the same name and cover appeared in 1991, but while using many of the same personnel, had only two tracks in common with the original LP. It instead compiled a distinct James Moody 10" LP (James Moody and his Modernists [BLP 5006]) with the Art Blakey tracks and included several tracks previously unreleased on LP or any format.

Big Jay McNeely

Big Jay McNeeleyJay McNeelyBig" Jay McNeely
Also featured Big Jay McNeely, Lionel Hampton and his Orchestra, The Medallions and The Penguins.
The Medallions, The Penguins and James Moody would also be featured that same day.

James Moody's Moods

James Moody's Moods is an album by saxophonist James Moody composed of sessions recorded in 1954 and 1955 which was released on the Prestige label.

List of jazz saxophonists

jazz saxophonistjazz alto saxophonistjazz saxophone
James Moody (March 26, 1925 – December 9, 2010) was an American jazz saxophone and flute player and very occasional vocalist, playing predominantly in the bebop and hard bop styles.

Hi Fi Party

Hi Fi Party is an album by saxophonist James Moody recorded in 1955 and released on the Prestige label.

Wail, Moody, Wail

Wail, Moody, Wail is an album by saxophonist James Moody recorded in 1955 and released on the Prestige label.

Flute 'n the Blues

Flute 'n the Blues is an album by saxophonist James Moody recorded in 1956 and released on the Argo label.

Last Train from Overbrook

Last Train from Overbrook is an album by saxophonist James Moody recorded in 1958 and released on the Argo label.

Todd Coolman

Coolman, Todd
The James Moody Quartet (with pianist Renee Rosnes, bassist Todd Coolman, and drummer Adam Nussbaum) was Moody's vehicle later in his career.
He is probably best known for his 26-year association with the James Moody Quartet.

James Moody (album)

James MoodyJames Moody'' (album)
James Moody is a self-titled album by saxophonist James Moody recorded in 1959 and released on the Argo label.

Argo Records

ArgoArgo Records Ltd.Argo Records UK
Although Chess was a blues label, the Argo division began to record jazz in 1955 and over decades attracted some big names: Gene Ammons, Kenny Burrell, Barry Harris, Illinois Jacquet, Ahmad Jamal, Ramsey Lewis, James Moody, Max Roach, Red Rodney, and Ira Sullivan.

Hey! It's James Moody

It's James Moody' is an album by saxophonist James Moody recorded in 1959 and released on the Argo label.