James Moore (Continental Army officer)

James MooreMoore, James, ColBrigadier General James MooreCol. James MooreColonel James MooreGen. James MooreGeneral James Moore
James Moore (c. undefined 1737 – c. undefined April 15, 1777) was a Continental Army general during the American Revolutionary War.wikipedia
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Francis Nash

Brigadier General Francis NashFrancisGeneral Francis Nash
Moore's niece, Mary, would later marry Moore's Continental Army colleague Francis Nash.
In 1775, he was named lieutenant colonel of the 1st North Carolina Regiment under Colonel James Moore, and served briefly in the southern theater of the Revolutionary War before being ordered north.

Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge

decisively defeateddefeated at Moore's Creek Bridge
After distinguishing himself in the campaign that led to the Patriot victory at the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, and the battle's aftermath on February 27, 1776, Moore was promoted to brigadier general in the Continental Army.
Pursuant to resolutions of the Second Continental Congress, the provincial congress had raised the 1st North Carolina Regiment of the Continental Army in fall 1775, and given command to Colonel James Moore.

Battle of Alamance

Battle of Alamance CreekBattlefield of Alamance
Moore served in the colonial militia during the French and Indian War, and commanded the colonial governor's artillery at the Battle of Alamance, which ended the War of the Regulation.

Fort Johnston (North Carolina)

Fort JohnstonFort Johnston GarrisonFort Johnston, North Carolina
In 1758, Governor Arthur Dobbs appointed him as the captain of a provincial garrison company at Fort Johnston, and Moore remained in command of that unit during the French and Indian War.
Colonel James Moore, however, routed a numerically superior force of Scottish Highlanders in Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge on 27 February 1776, and the British abandoned their strategy.

Alfred Moore

Justice Alfred MooreMoore
Moore's nephew, Alfred Moore, served in the Continental Army under Moore's command and would go on to become an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.
In 1775 the American Revolutionary War broke out and Alfred served as a captain in the First Regiment, North Carolina Line, of which his uncle, James Moore, was colonel, and took part in the defense of Charleston, S.C. in June 1776.

North Carolina Line

North Carolina Brigadecontinental lineNorth Carolina Brigade of the North Carolina Line

Brunswick Town, North Carolina

Brunswick TownBrunswick Town State Historic SiteBrunswick
In protest of the Stamp Act, in 1766 Moore led an armed mob that occupied the de facto capital town of Brunswick, North Carolina.
Colonel Maurice Moore was the father of General James Moore and Judge Maurice Moore.

1st North Carolina Regiment

1st1st North Carolina Continental Regiment
On February 15, 1776, Moore was given command of the 1st North Carolina Regiment raised at the direction of the Second Continental Congress, and placed in charge of the defense of the Cape Fear region.

James Moore (governor)

James MooreColonel James MooreGovernor James Moore
Moore was, through his father's side, a grandson of Governor James Moore, who was governor of the Province of Carolina when North and South Carolina were a single colony.
Moore was the grandfather of American Revolutionary War Brigadier General James Moore, and great-grandfather of Major General Robert Howe.

John Ashe (general)

John AsheAshe, John Sr., M.G.General John Ashe
His sister, Rebecca Moore, would marry a Revolutionary War leader, militia General John Ashe.
He married Rebecca Moore, sister of Judge Maurice Moore and General James Moore.

Departments of the Continental Army

Southern DepartmentNorthern DepartmentEastern Department
Moore briefly held de facto command of the Southern Department before his death due to illness in April 1777.

Provincial troops in the French and Indian Wars

provincial troopsprovincial soldiersprovincial regiment
In 1758, Governor Arthur Dobbs appointed him as the captain of a provincial garrison company at Fort Johnston, and Moore remained in command of that unit during the French and Indian War.

Robert Howe (Continental Army officer)

Robert HoweHowe, Robert, ColColonel Robert Howe
Moore himself had returned to North Carolina on January 8, 1777, in an attempt to alleviate the poor conditions in which his soldiers found themselves, and to raise funds to pay his men, leaving the Southern Department under the command of Brigadier General Robert Howe.
In March 1776, Howe was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General by the Second Continental Congress along with fellow North Carolinian James Moore.

Continental Army

ContinentalContinental soldiersContinentals
Moore's nephew, Alfred Moore, served in the Continental Army under Moore's command and would go on to become an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. undefined April 15, 1777) was a Continental Army general during the American Revolutionary War.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
undefined April 15, 1777) was a Continental Army general during the American Revolutionary War.

Moore family (Carolinas)

James Moore, Jr.familyJames Moore
Born into a prominent political family in the colonial Province of North Carolina, he was one of only five generals from North Carolina to serve in the Continental Army.

Province of North Carolina

North CarolinaNorth Carolina ColonyRoyal Colony of North Carolina
Born into a prominent political family in the colonial Province of North Carolina, he was one of only five generals from North Carolina to serve in the Continental Army.

Cape Fear River

Cape FearThe Cape FearCape Fear Rivers
Moore spent much of his childhood and youth on his family's estates in the lower Cape Fear River area, but soon became active in the colonial military structure in North Carolina.

Militia (United States)

militiastate militiaIllinois Militia
Moore served in the colonial militia during the French and Indian War, and commanded the colonial governor's artillery at the Battle of Alamance, which ended the War of the Regulation. His sister, Rebecca Moore, would marry a Revolutionary War leader, militia General John Ashe.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
Moore served in the colonial militia during the French and Indian War, and commanded the colonial governor's artillery at the Battle of Alamance, which ended the War of the Regulation. In 1758, Governor Arthur Dobbs appointed him as the captain of a provincial garrison company at Fort Johnston, and Moore remained in command of that unit during the French and Indian War.

War of the Regulation

Regulator movementRegulatorsRegulator
Moore served in the colonial militia during the French and Indian War, and commanded the colonial governor's artillery at the Battle of Alamance, which ended the War of the Regulation.

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
In addition to his military involvement, he was active in the independence movement, despite having been a supporter of the colonial government during his early career.

Sons of Liberty

Son of LibertyThe Sons of LibertyOrder of the Sons of Liberty
Moore played a prominent role in the local Sons of Liberty organizations, and assisted in organizing the colony-wide extra-legal Provincial Congress.

North Carolina Provincial Congress

Provincial Congressprovincial congressesFourth Provincial Congress
Moore played a prominent role in the local Sons of Liberty organizations, and assisted in organizing the colony-wide extra-legal Provincial Congress.